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Fried HD-DVR's

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by phatmatt1215, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. phatmatt1215

    phatmatt1215 Icon

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    I'm sure this is in the wrong place, so it can be moved or deleted. We were having some electrical work done in our house today and the electrician did something, and whatever he did, he ended up frying all three of our DVR's DEAD!

    An HR 20-700, HR-21-700, and an OLD HUGHES one from eons ago. Anyway. We all had a bunch of shows on the two DVR"S.... Is there any way we can recapture any of the shows that are on the dead DVR's?? I'm guessing not.
     
  2. matt

    matt New Member

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    No, the hard drive is tied to the receiver. Are they owned or leased boxes? Do you have the protection plan?
     
  3. bixler

    bixler Hall Of Fame

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    :eek2::eek2: Hopefully your house is still standing:nono2:
     
  4. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Dripping...
    Recordings on the harddrives are married to the physical DVR, so you can't take them out and swap them to a working box.
     
  5. phatmatt1215

    phatmatt1215 Icon

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    Nov 4, 2007

    They are leased, and unfortunately we don't have the protection plan.... I had a feeling that everything we had on them was lost forever, but wanted to double check. We are going to talk to the electricians boss and try to get them to pay for some damages.
     
  6. dsw2112

    dsw2112 Always Searching

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    Have you checked the rest of your electrical equipment in the house to verify functionality? 3 dead DVR's is likely going to raise some questions on D*'s end and charges may be in order. You should speak with the electrician and/or contractor regarding the issue to let them know they will be liable for any damage caused (this is why they're bonded and insured.) After that you should probably find a new electrician...

    P.S. What exactly did the electrician do that caused the problem? That info will help determine what else might be problematic...
     
  7. matt

    matt New Member

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    Well since they are leased you could get one replaced for the shipping cost, but I don't think they will let you do three without questioning what is going on. I would see what the boss has to say, let us know.
     
  8. Rabushka

    Rabushka Legend

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    I am curious. What could the electrician have possibly done to burn out all three receivers? Did he connect them to a 220 volt line? I would think this is a hard thing to do by mistake. What about your other equipment? The TV must have been connected to the same circuit. Is that ok?
     
  9. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    At first you might think so, "but" where I am, they allow one leg of the 220 to be carried over the white wires [what is neutral on the 110 circuits], so it "could happen" easier than you might think. :eek2:
     
  10. matt

    matt New Member

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    Pulled the neutral. Now the POCO is upset, everything is fried, and the OP is at the public library. :nono:
     
  11. Shades228

    Shades228 DaBears

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    This is incorrect actually. Failure due to damage/abuse is not covered. You're better off finding out the costs to replace the equipment and what they will charge you for damaged equipment. Then you can find out the real cost to talk to the electrician's boss about. There are also other electrical devices I'm sure that were impacted. The electrician's company will more than likely try to settle with you first for some/most of it. If you insist on all of it I would guess they will open an insurance claim. I would also call another electrician to inspect the house to ensure that nothing else happened.
     
  12. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    I would second Shades. Call up DirecTV and explain what happened to them and find out the actual cost to you to replace the receivers. Make sure you get it in writing or in an e-mail. That is what you need to present to the electician's boss.

    - Merg
     
  13. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Could be just fuses blow - easy to fix, but hard to open the covers if there are void labels.
     
  14. drpjr

    drpjr Icon

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    Nov 23, 2007
    Sakatomatoes...
    Indeed. As easy as unscrewing 1 wire nut on a neutral that is common to two 110v circuits (on different phases) and poof/smoke.:(

    Good advice. And to take it a bit further. All licensed contractors are required to post a bond for just this type of mistake/damage. Do not let the contractor try to have you put this on your homeowners insurance and then offer to "do a little extra at no charge" for you. You do not want this claim on your homeowners policy. It could raise your rates or even cause a cancellation if you have previous claims or more bad luck in the future. His mistake= His nickel.
     
  15. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Very true. You should never file a claim under your homeowner's policy unless absolutely necessary. And in this case, that is why contractor's are supposed to be bonded and insured for the work they do.

    - Merg
     
  16. bubbagscotch

    bubbagscotch AllStar

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    Just say there was an electrical interference or surge in the area and when you tried turning on the receivers they were dead. Did your tv's or computers also get fried?
     
  17. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    That's if the electrician has insurance. I've done a lot of work in people's houses (no, I never caused anything bad to happen :) ) and that was totally without insurance.

    The home owner takes responsibility for the electrical work and says he has done the work himself, then gets it inspected. In these cases, I would think the home owner's insurance would kick in (with the usual $500) deductible.

    I stopped doing work in people's houses a long time ago, but it still goes on and is just one of the loopholes in most town's permitting regulations.

    I really am interested to see how this story plays out. Did the TS hire a licensed electrician? Does the electrician have insurance? You'd be amazed at how many licensed contractors don't have insurance.

    Why wouldn't a licensed contractor have insurance? They had to have it to get a license, but contractors tend to let the insurance lapse in hard economic times and nobody ever thinks to call the insurance company up and verify the policy.

    In times like this, a lot of contractors are doing two or three jobs at once and paying for materials with other people's money, sort of "robbing Peter to pay Paul."

    I can tell you this, D* is not gonna be happy if the TS tries to send two or three DVRs back at once. Even the PP only takes one bad HR back every 30 days. You can argue your way out of that, I have, but you gotta have a good reason.

    My big question is this: After all we've written about the Protection Plan being a "good thing", why didn't the TS have it? And why don't the rest of you who don't have it get it? This is a perfect example of why it's needed.

    By the way, the odds on getting a decent electrician are pretty poor. I've been one for a long time, I've supervised them, hired them (that's something I stopped doing pretty quickly when I saw what poor electricians we had to choose from, didn't want that kind of responsibility) and I know one electrical contractor in New Jersey that I would trust, but I'd be with him every step of the way.

    I've never had many good things to say about D*'s installers or technicians (if they really exist), and I feel pretty much the same way about electricians. Who better to criticize and electrician than an electrician?

    Rich
     
  18. drpjr

    drpjr Icon

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    Nov 23, 2007
    Sakatomatoes...
    So true. Or to call and verify the license is good and actually for the same person.:eek2:
    Now days that seems to be the norm.:( Unfortunatly there is always a Paul that comes up short. Even good contractors get into trouble this way because they don't know how to run a business.



    It's been my experience you can substitute "any trade" for electrician. Good people are few and far between.
    I too am a retired electrician and I am most critical of shoddy electrical work.:mad::mad: I am hoping this particular one steps up and does the right thing.:) Even in the face of reality I am an eternal "half full" guy.
     
  19. tbpb3

    tbpb3 Legend

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    Dec 9, 2006
    That's why I can't see what the protection plan is for.To realign your dish?
     
  20. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Piscataway, NJ
    Didn't used to be like it is now. Tradesmen used to take pride in their work. Damn shame.

    Rich
     

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