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Genie requires no additional boxes for other rooms now?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by KoRn, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I just saw an ad, it says "you don't have to look at a box in every room". Considering the options for a client, certainly is true.
     
  2. RACJ2

    RACJ2 Hall Of Fame

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    At least they are upfront with a disclaimer that advises you to to call a doctor, if their pills works so well that it last for hours! ;)
     
  3. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I looked that up once, and what can happen... :eek2:
     
  4. Volatility

    Volatility Legend

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    In some states, the customer does have a timeframe to cancel before they get charged the ecf. I can understand your point of view however.
     
  5. deanandmaria

    deanandmaria New Member

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    IMO, AT&T U-Verse started this, DTV is just jumping on the train.

    AT&T's campaign about their wireless receivers is even worse. It eliminates the wire from the wall to the cable box. There's still the power cords (2) and the cable from the box to the TV. What's worse is that they market the thing like you can take it out in the middle of your back yard if you want.

    Thankfully the swimming pool one seems to be off the air. Yeah people . . . let's encourage kids to take a powered television poolside.
     
  6. Athenian

    Athenian Legend

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    That was my first thought when I saw the ad. AFAIK though, DirecTV doesn't have anything right now that actually competes with the U-Verse wireless receiver.

    Ads that imply that you can move the TV out to the middle of the yard are silly (you still need power to the devices) but there is a real market for moving televisions around. Our third TV gets so little use that I've often considered discontinuing it. It would be much more useful to be able to move it around as needed -- out on the patio, down to the shop, etc.
     
  7. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    And Pepsi ads show people drinking Pepsi and behaving as if they were high as a kite.

    Rich
     
  8. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Actually, if the swimming pool meets code, you could dump a plugged in TV into a swimming pool and all you'd do is wreck the TV. Don't believe me? My wife didn't until I threw a plugged in extension cord into our pool and...nothing happened except the GFI tripped, as I told her it would.

    Rich
     
  9. Kaiser Bob

    Kaiser Bob Cool Member

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    +1

    When they worded it stop looking at boxes and cables I figured they meant the C31 mounted behind the tv in RF mode.
     
  10. deanandmaria

    deanandmaria New Member

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    Want to bet how many homes out there meet the required codes? Would you have tried it with your wife IN the pool? Don't answer that! I might question your intentions.
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    As a matter of fact, I was in my electrical apprenticeship when a near naked man greeted our class in an electrical lab that we used for hands on learning. We were told to sit down and stay in our seats. The man (wearing only shorts) proceeded to wrap bare wire around his upper body and got into a large tub filled with water and told the instructor to "Plug me in!)...

    Let me back up here. The person in shorts was going around the country with his tub and introducing the GFCI (note the difference in the acronym from the now accepted GFI) a new device that...well, let's get back to the story...

    So, the instructor first points to the LED on the receptacle and tell us to note the LED is on and the receptacle is energized. Then he plugs in the plug on the bare wire and...nada. We do hear a click and the light on the receptacle goes off, but the guy in the tub is unharmed! Then, he climbs out of the tub and takes the wire off his body. He spent the rest of the session explaining how the GFCI works.

    I'm not gonna try to explain how it works, but I will tell you what you'd see if an oscilloscope was used: First, imagine an ordinary single phase 120VAC sine wave. The straight line is 0 volts, the line that shows the voltage is rising and falling between (doing this on memory alone, correct me if I'm wrong) 167VAC measured from the top of the positive sine to the bottom of the negative sine. (I was wrong when I first posted and VOS caught it, bless his heart) Got that? Now imagine that the voltage induced just starts to ascend and is shut off very close to the straight line that signifies 0 volts. That's what happens when a GFI trips. Practically no voltage before shutting down and that's the life saver. I don't know or remember exactly what voltage it trips at, but it's so quick nothing bad can possibly happen.

    It's been ~ 40 years since that demonstration and I've never seen a GFI fail. So, yeah, I know what would happen if I threw my wife in the pool with the extension cord plugged into a GFI wrapped around her...nothing. Would I try it? No.

    With no GFI, the person would die. He/she would be electrocuted. Another thing to remember, there is no second chance with electrocution. You die. I know state mandated electrocutions have failed, but that's because the electrocution process failed. If you actually get electrocuted there are no second choices.

    One more thing about the GFIs: They should be used when a double-insulated tool is used. During the course of their evolution, someone discovered that not only do they interrupt the circuit if it is suddenly grounded, but they also measure leakage from hot to neutral wiring and trip immediately if something is amiss. We had a guy get a wicked shock when using a double-insulated drill and immediately rewrote our hot work procedures to include using a GFI when using double-insulated tools. This information is included in the paperwork you get when you buy most GFIs. Or was.

    Rich
     
  12. machavez00

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  13. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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  14. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Dripping...
    I thought FIOS TV used the same system as cable TV (not IPTV) just that it was delivered over fiber. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verizon_FiOS
     
  15. Beerstalker

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    It says "FiOS customers subscribing to FiOS TV and FiOS Internet can download our newest app to watch live streaming of select channels and view commercial movies through select LG devices."

    To me that sounds kind of like DirecTV's TV anywhere, except its on an LG TV instead of an iPhone/iPad. I think theoretically DirecTV could do pretty much the same thing if they wanted. Take the DirecTV apps for the iPhone or iPad and make them work for different TVs, Blu-Ray players, or something like an AppleTV or Roku.
     

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