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GenieGO IP Address

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Connected Home' started by Blitz68, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. Jul 8, 2013 #1 of 40
    Blitz68

    Blitz68 Hall Of Fame

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    We lost power and my GenieGO got a new ip so the ports weren't forwarded to the right ip. We really need to be able to assign it a static ip.
     
  2. Jul 8, 2013 #2 of 40
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    You should investigate whether or not your router supports MAC-based DHCP address assignments. If it is in there, you'll find it on the DHCP configuration page.

    This would solve this problem.
     
  3. Jul 8, 2013 #3 of 40
    Blitz68

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    I have an LinkSys E3200 and cannot find a Mac dhcp setup. Can you check for me?
     
  4. Jul 8, 2013 #4 of 40
    Blitz68

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    I did this was it right?
    ImageUploadedByDBSTalk1373327308.960792.jpg
     
  5. Jul 8, 2013 #5 of 40
    brian26339

    brian26339 New Member

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    Yep.
     
  6. Jul 8, 2013 #6 of 40
    The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    I did this was it right?
    ImageUploadedByDBSTalk1373327308.960792.jpg


    Yup. With DHCP Reservations, you get the same effect as if you have set up a static IP address. Basically, you tell the router to always assign the same IP address to a device with a specific MAC address.


    - Merg

    Sent from my iPad using DBSTalk mobile app
     
  7. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    This is really an issue with the GenieGo...there is no way to assign a static IP to the GenieGo and OOH depends upon port forwarding. A reserved IP address is the ONLY way to keep the configuration stable long term.
     
  8. mrdobolina

    mrdobolina AllStar

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    I have a question about DHCP reservations: Does the reservation IP address need to be within your DHCP range? Or can it be outside of it?

    Also, can you both assign a DHCP reservation AND have a static IP? Or is it 1 or the other?

    I didn't really know about DHCP reserves when I recently "re-organized" my network. I gave all of my DirecTV receivers static IP addresses, and now I am rethinking that. Perhaps thinking of just adding DHCP reservations and just "reserving" the static IP.
     
  9. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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  10. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    1. Actually, a DHCP Reserved address is, by definition, within the DHCP range of the router. Basically, the DHCP server on the router is going to assign an IP address for your device using an IP address from the DHCP range/pool. In the case of DHCP Reservations, it just assigns the IP address that you specified. When giving a device a static IP address, you want to use an address outside of the DHCP range.

    2. There is no reason to set both a DHCP Reservation for a device on the router and set the device itself with a static IP address. Plus, as mentioned, the GenieGo cannot be set with a static IP address.

    3. I would highly recommend not using static IP addresses. They have a tendency to hide issues that might be going on with your network. When using DHCP reservations, you can usually see all of your devices and what IP address they are from within the router setup page. Also, as long as the device is getting its IP address, you know that it is seeing your router and connecting to your network.

    - Merg
     
  11. mrdobolina

    mrdobolina AllStar

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    Thanks, guys.

    I'm not trying to set a static IP for the geniego. I do already have it setup as a reserved DHCP IP address.

    The reason I was asking about both static IP and reserved at the same time is that I already have a bunch of my "always at home" devices (DTV receivers, WCCK, desktop CPU, printer, TVs, etc) setup with static IPs. I was thinking of just using my routers DHCP Reservations utility to simply "reserve" those static IPs for all of those devices.

    Everything is working for me now. I might eventually re-jigger my network to have all DHCP reservations instead of static IP, but it won't be until I have a little more time on my hands.
     
  12. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Personally, I use reserved IP for all the DirecTV equipment (all receivers, DVRs, GenieGo). I got into this habit when I had Tivo DVRs and ran telnet and Tivo Plus on them. The only real reason to do it with the DirecTV DVRs is if you have Network Services running (since that involves port forwarding to the DVRs), but I don't think Network Services really does anything these days. It might also make Whole Home bootup a bit faster to always have a DVR come back up on the same address, but the difference will be tiny, if any. As Merg says, there is no reason to assign a reserved IP outside of the DHCP range. The whole point of reserving the IP address is to make sure that the specified device, and ONLY that device, always gets the assigned address.

    Using reserved IP instead of static keeps all the devices visible to the router and provides some additional ways to quickly identify problems. For example, if a given DVR doesn't show up in your Whole Home network and doesn't show as active on your router, you know it didn't get it's addresss on start up (and so may be using a generic 169 address).
     
  13. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    Not necessarily the case. see screenshot
     

    Attached Files:

  14. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Not necessarily the case. see screenshot


    Well, you are using an Apple router, which as we know, Apple loves to do things their own way… :lol:

    Most routers will not let you set a DHCP reservation outside of the specified DHCP range.


    - Merg

    Sent from my iPhone using DBSTalk mobile app
     
  15. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    It may be possible, but it is pointless.
     
  16. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    There are some crazy routers out there. . . some Belkins have the entire Class C address space as the DHCP pool. Some randomly assign from the pool rather than sequentially.

    I set statics for all 'permanent' devices and use DHCP for any mobile devices - ipads, iPhones, etc.

    DD-wrt firmware does allow setting a reservation outside of the pool. And it lists any active clients whether in the DHCP pool or a static address.
     
  17. mrdobolina

    mrdobolina AllStar

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    Yeah, come to think of it, I am pretty sure I set my Geniego to a DHCP reserved IP outside of the DHCP range. My router (One of the newer Linksys Dual band routers) allowed me to reserve an IP address within the range that I have all of my TV equipment. I keep a spreadsheet with all of my static IP assignments so I know where I want everything to go.

    Anyway, I guess it's just a matter of personal preference and what works for each individual setup, much like choosing a TV provider in the first place!
     
  18. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Most router firmware will show all known addreses (static or dynamic) in the router table, and wireless nodes will almost always be visible in a "connected devices" list. However, the most visible list to the casual user is almost always the DHCP clients list.

    Really cheap routers are often barely functional, and lack many configuration options. I'll never understand why people buy some of these $30 (and less) routers. The router is your gateway to the internet, and performs many crucial functions. While I realize not everyone will spend the $150 to $200 top of the line routers cost, it seems silly to me to depend on a $30 device to be the heart of your local area network.
     
  19. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    And some of the worst are provided by the DSL or Cable vendor.
     
  20. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

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    Humm ... wish I had a better way to monitor my home network. Router is a new Linksys (Cisco) E2500 which like all my previous Linksys routers running the stock FW can't see static IP clients assigned outside the DHCP range which I have the DIRECTV DVRs on.

    Have to rely on a Cisco Network Magic Pro app. installed on a PC that has problems with occasional inaccurate listings on its network map display. And most irritating, for some reason suffers random shutdowns to its software platform causing me to have to constantly restart app throughout the day as it runs in the background.
     

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