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God On the Brain

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Bogy, Jan 8, 2005.

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  1. Jan 8, 2005 #1 of 21
    Bogy

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    God On the Brain
    Jon, it seems I am more evolved than you are. Because I have experienced God communicating with me. :lol:

    In a way this may explain an experience in a church I served some years ago. She said that when I peached she could see an aura around me. She assumed it was the Holy Spirit, or God, present in me at that time. Now it is obvious that this is indeed the case, and that God is present in me as an electromagnetic field, acting upon my temporal lobe antenna, which certain other highly sensitive people can pick up. :D :angel:
     
  2. Jan 9, 2005 #2 of 21
    bavaria72

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    And for those of you who don't believe in his/her existent, I'm sorry for you because in my experiences he/she does indeed exist (as well as the "bad" guy/girl). Call me kooky but he /she has more than once "smacked" me up the side of the head. And for me - I am happy he/she did!!! I just look up into the heavens on a dark starry Texas night and a smile breaks across my face!
     
  3. Jan 9, 2005 #3 of 21
    HappyGoLucky

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    Our brains also evolved receptors for opiates, so does that mean we should all start shooting heroin? :)
     
  4. Jan 9, 2005 #4 of 21
    SAEMike

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    Comparing God to heroin, very classy.
     
  5. Jan 9, 2005 #5 of 21
    Bogy

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    You are just jealous because you don't have sensitive temporal lobes. :)
     
  6. Jan 9, 2005 #6 of 21
    jonstad

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    I could suggest that atheists, rather then having temporal lobe insensitivity, have simply evolved our reasoning and logic "sensitivity" to overcome it. But I won't.:sure:

    And then there's this of course.:D The idea that some of these guys have had chemical imbalances of the brain, sometimes known as "mental impairments", is one I have suggested before myself. And again leads to the analogy that hearing and believing "voices in the head" is normally an indication for psychiatric treatment, and when acted upon, institutionalization. The glaring exception naturally being if such voices are interpreted as a religious experience. Then all of a sudden, "it's a miracle!":bang::hair:

    From all this, the objective observer would conclude atheists are simply not as mentally impaired as believers.;)

    The of course there's always the possibility of the use of artificial psychoactive agents, foods, beverage or chemicals causing much the same effect, probably stimulating the "sensitivities" of the temporal lobes. I don't recall direct reference to this in the Bible although it might not be something you include in a narrative when trying to lend credence to "visions".:rolleyes:

    There is plenty of reference in the Bible to fasting however, which may result in many of the same "symptoms". Often these fasts are described as an effort to get closer or commune with God, and often, profound revelations are claimed during and immediately after fasts.

    The idea that God placed "sensitivities" in our brains as some sort of antennae or radar to be able to detect God is really reaching for it though. If God so desired, there are about a million more efficient and unambiguous ways to inform us of Its presense. God could simply appear before us all, or perform acts that could only be interpreted as being divine acts. The Bible tells us in fact that in ancient times God DID appear on a semi-regular basis, certainly spoke to many men over an extended time period, many more then once. And on more then one occasion brought down the relatively unambiguous fire and brimstone upon us, along with many other various and sundry divine miracles.

    So what's the problem? Did God just tire of knocking our heads together and give up? The very threshold for miracles has been seriously downgraded until today the occasional recovery from an otherwise incurable disease or a single survivor or a plane crash where all others were burnt to a crisp is viewed as obvious divine intervention.:lol::nono:

    I suggest all of you get your brain chemicals checked on your next annual physical. Perhaps there's a problem you are not aware of. Or on the bright side, your "God receptors" are in prime shape.:hurah:
     
  7. Jan 9, 2005 #7 of 21
    dummyproof

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    Bogy's post above quotes a blogger's entry who, not surprisingly, used "edited notes from the ABC God on the Brain Doco". Not that it matters, and I believe it to be an inadvertant typo, but the documentary that was wrongly attributed to "ABC", was actually "BBC". The link to the "complete" transcript can be read here.

    Now here is a few of my "selected excerpts" from the transcript:
    and...
    and...
    ...hmmm brain damage/abnormalties and belief in god? ...personally I'm not at all surprised.
     
  8. Jan 9, 2005 #8 of 21
    pjmrt

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    interesting.... But at least one flaw, when Paul encountered Jesus on the road to Damascas, all his traveling companions witnessed it. Also a believer was told to expect Paul (then called Saul). Plus Paul was blinded then healed miraculously. Interesting that this "brain damage" as you called it could effect so many people at the same time. Maybe the ones with brain damage are the ones who close their eyes and claim there is no God. :D
     
  9. Jan 9, 2005 #9 of 21
    Bogy

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    Jon, I keep telling you, God does speak to people today. Its just that some people don't hear it. Evidently they don't have the lobes for it. :lol:

    Poor Dawkins. No lobe sensitivity at all, and he works to hard to rationalize things. :D
     
  10. dummyproof

    dummyproof Godfather

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    ...and what "brain damaged" eyewitless suppossedly documented this?
     
  11. SimpleSimon

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    What gets me is that some people seem to be locked into a single explanation for "all" these happenings. Just because someone attributes something to "god" doesn't mean that it was (or was not), but more importantly that the "god" action could have many possible causes.

    Some of them might really be "god", some might be seizures, some might be Sitchin's aliens, and of course, some might simply be natural events.

    Personally, I think "all of the above" is the correct answer, and that "god" is little to nothing more than the combined spiritual energy of "everything".

    Said energy can be tapped under varying circumstances ranging from the 90 pound mother lifting the car off her baby, to healing "miracles", to the energy found at various Masses (Catholic, Wiccan, whatever - it's all the same).

    In adition, said energy might appear to be the face of god, or Jesus, or Buddha, or whomever. Or said appearances might be nothing more than focused seizures. Again, the correct answer is "all of the above".

    If you want to hang Jesus's face on your deity, that's fine with me. It'll work for you, no doubt. I've seen that face - and the wink and nod as the Understanding happened.

    Some people need the face to focus upon, others don't. Some might call that blasphemy, others might call it true enlightenment. Doesn't matter to me - I "know" what I "know" - faith is not needed, nor a factor. :)
     
  12. jonstad

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    You chose the wrong career path. Perhaps when you leave your current post you can join the Christian Comedy Club circuit?;)

    You mean "Darwin's pitbull"?

    I'm actually just finishing his latest book, The Ancestor's Tale. Well written, a good read and interesting, to me at least.:grin: Although fans of romance novels or Tom Clancy might not be so effusive. Based on the form of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales wherein each chapter is devoted to an ancestor linked to a currently living species. So for instance early on we meet the human/chimp common ancestor, then the human/gorilla ancestor, human/monkey ancestor, and so on. I'm on the last "rendevous", Archaea, which are essentially very simple single-celled bacteria. The book is 99% biology, although being Dawkins, he can't resist the occasional swipe/stab at creationists(including GWB).:sure: But it's much more about science then politics or religion and an excellent up to date account for anyone interested in the subject. One interesting, and humbling, insight I took away and will hopefully keep, is that there is really no such thing as primative or lower life forms. Even the meek Archaea has had exactly the same amount of time to evolve as we humans and every other species alive today. In fact, in a sense, we are the lower life forms. Archaea found it's niche and stayed there, changing very little, perfectly suited to its role in the environment. It is we who couldn't cope and found the need to change to something else.

    Anyway, I digress.:blush:

    I assume this is the passage you refer to.
    I think Dawkins was at least partially victim of his own skepticism. I'm a little skeptical myself that a "questionaire" could identify particular "brain sensitivities". I suspect it might be a questionaire to identify skepticism as much as anything. Dawkins does compare his feelings as "things that could happen to me any time on a dark night", implying a vague sense of fear or forboding. Just as we are loathe to admit the close relationship of pleasure and pain, or love and hate. So too are fear(and/or awe) closely linked to religious experience. It's no coincidence we might get goose bumps from a scary movie or hearing a lion roar in the bush, OR "things that could happen to me any time on a dark night", and have the same skin response in a stained glass cathedral with the pipe organ and choir at full blast, or even silently in deep prayer fervently believing God is actually hearing us.

    Not discounting some are more sensitive or receptive then others, the "dark night" feeling Dawkins had could as easily be interpreted by someone else as the presence of God, or any number of things. I remember getting "goose bumped out" watching The Shining for the first time on HBO, ALONE!:eek:

    That said, I can relate to "Dawkins' syndrome". My healthy(?) dose of skepticism often prevents me from suspending disbelief watching a fictional television show or movie, especially action shows with lots of special effects. Instead of "WOW!" I find myself muttering "that couldn't happen.":shrug: I have enjoyed a few science fiction books and movies(of course in the future, ANYTHING "could happen") but won't even glance at a standard novel unless there's a naked woman on the cover, in which case it deserves a glance.:p My favorites are non-fiction political or science treatises, movies at least "based on a true story" and comedy or drama realistically portraying humans at their best or worst. Casablanca is still the best movie ever running the gamut of human emotion, love, hate, fear, regret, patriotic pride, forgiveness and self-sacrifice, with as I remember 2-3 gunshots and maybe the worst "special effects" ever.(the toy plane taking off from the toy airport):lol:

    On the epilepsy front, on a now defunct secular humanist board, the described seizure visions came up. One of the resident atheists related that he was an epileptic and confirmed the aftermath of a seizure can be quite pleasant, a profound calmness with vivid colors, strange aromas and intensified sound and even more sensitive touch. I suppose it's analgous to one's brain "rebooting" after the "crash" of the seizure. He went so far as to suggest he sometimes almost felt sorry for non-epileptics who could never share this pleasantness.

    It is very easy to understand how such experiences, pleasing temporary states of altered consciousness, might be interpreted as visions, messages from God or "the beyond". And how on returning to one's normal lucid state, one could be quite convinced, and convincing, that's what they actually were.
     
  13. HappyGoLucky

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    And God wants to shakedown all his believers for millions of dollars or else he'll kill Oral Roberts. Is Oral's lobes working correctly? :sure:
     
  14. Nick

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    The...
    Are Oral's lobes working correctly?
     
  15. Bogy

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    There isn't that much difference between standup and preaching, at least not the way I do it, without a pulpit or notes. :)
    Many of the famous Jewish comedians who worked vaudeville had been trained as rabbis.
     
  16. jonstad

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    Shouldn't that be Aural's lobes?;)
     
  17. jonstad

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    So are you one of those "a funny thing happened on the way to judgement day" guys? Or more in the "take my cruxifixion, please" camp?:p
     
  18. Bogy

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    Well, if you want to know and have a fast connection and a big mailbox, I just ripped two of my sermons to mp3. Even as an mp3 a 20 minute sermon is about six to eight meg. :)
     
  19. jonstad

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    Funny you should mention that. I'm currently sitting at home waiting for the "cable guy". They told me between 8 and 4 and I thought I was in luck when he called at 7:50 to say he'd be here in 10 minutes. Right on time, but after installation informed me his partner who actually sets up the modem would swing around at 2, MAYBE!:hair:

    Post a link, or however you do this kind of new-fangled thing. I'm a Eudora guy. 3Com should be able to handle it.
     
  20. dummyproof

    dummyproof Godfather

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    If ever there was a time to feign 28.8... :D








    ...j/k
     
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