1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Goodbye, Cursive?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Nick, Oct 8, 2012.

Should cursive writing continue to be taught in schools?

  1. Yes

    3 vote(s)
    3.2%
  2. No

    54 vote(s)
    56.8%
  3. Not sure

    38 vote(s)
    40.0%
  1. Oct 8, 2012 #1 of 121
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

    21,866
    189
    Apr 23, 2002
    The...
    Cursive handwriting is disappearing from schools. Do we have a responsibility to save it?
    Source: http://responsibility-project.libertymutual.com/blog/should-cursive-be-saved-#fbid=46xBbSR3fg4
     
  2. Oct 8, 2012 #2 of 121
    sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    14,599
    370
    Sep 5, 2006
    Allen, TX
    Hand writing is becoming obsolete, but we should still be able to write legibly.
     
  3. Oct 8, 2012 #3 of 121
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,322
    500
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    Legible writing certainly is important, but whether true cursive is important is debatable. I find that most of my writing is on things like forms, which of course can't be in cursive.

    I think my problem is, by the time I'm getting to the end of the form, my hand starts cramping from holding the pen. Too used to a mouse maybe. Either that or forms are too long. Taking notes in a meeting, and I'm fine.
     
  4. Oct 8, 2012 #4 of 121
    TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

    7,259
    198
    Oct 1, 2003
    Phoenix, AZ
    The only time I use cursive is to sign my name.

    I'm not even sure if I remember how to do cursive for the other letters anymore.
     
  5. Oct 8, 2012 #5 of 121
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
    183
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    I asked a coworker with elementary school children if they could do longhand and he indicated that it is still part of the program and both of his kids do a better job than he does.

    Longhand and swingsets should remain as important promoters and indicators of motor skills and coordination.
     
  6. Oct 8, 2012 #6 of 121
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,322
    500
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    I know I always did have a problem making a capital G or S in cursive, at least making them look good. I tend to use a mixture these days, like many do.
     
  7. Oct 8, 2012 #7 of 121
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    I actually think NO... it shouldn't be.

    Why?

    Other than your signature, what long for writing do we do now?
    We take our own chicken-scratch notes for ourselves... which even then is going digital.

    My 11yr turns 90% of his homework in electronic.. the rest isn't long hand writing anyway.

    The schools already spend nearly no time with writing...
     
  8. Oct 8, 2012 #8 of 121
    AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,787
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    I remember teaching myself Morse Code when I was in Boy Scouts, in hopes of earning my Morse Code Merit Badge, but they couldn't give me one because there was no one available to administer the speed test.

    Around that time, I acquired a decades old Boy Scout Handbook, and it had a section on Semaphore. I decided to teach myself Semaphore, but soon realized that there would be no one to communicate with that way, either.

    Looking back, if I had found a second person to learn Morse Code or Semaphore, I would have been wasting his time and mine.

    There used to be an old joke, along the lines of, There's nothing wrong with my handwriting because I have no trouble reading it. You, on the other hand, would often not be able to reading my handwriting, whether you yourself had excelled in penmanship in elementary school or not. I'm afraid that the benefit of cursive scriptwriting is no longer worth the expenditure of time and effort necessary to develop proficiency at it.
     
  9. Oct 8, 2012 #9 of 121
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    Well said
     
  10. Oct 8, 2012 #10 of 121
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    YES! My daughters third grade teacher insisted on her students learning the basics but sadly this does not seem to be the case with fourth grade, this teacher prefers the children use print. However, I insist my daughter uses cursive when at home and that includes for all homework. I've made it perfectly clear that my daughter will follow the 'print only' rule in school but when at home I expect her to write in cursive.
     
  11. Oct 8, 2012 #11 of 121
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    I have always done the same thing, a use a printed letter for the cap and finish off the rest in cursive and have even suggested to my daughter that she might want to take this approach as she is having a hard time with some of the caps as well.
     
  12. Oct 8, 2012 #12 of 121
    sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    14,599
    370
    Sep 5, 2006
    Allen, TX
    Out of curiosity, why? Please note, I'm not judging or trying to tell you how to raise your kid...I'm just curious why. :)
     
  13. Oct 8, 2012 #13 of 121
    Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

    30,092
    3
    Nov 15, 2005
    I've been wracking my brain since I saw this thread...
    On the last time I have written ANYTHING other than my signature, in cursive in the last YEAR.....

    And I simply can't think of it... I couldn't even tell you the last time I written more than my signature, for probably the last 5-6 years.
     
  14. Oct 8, 2012 #14 of 121
    AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,787
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    [​IMG] versus [​IMG]

    [​IMG] versus [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  15. Oct 8, 2012 #15 of 121
    AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,787
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    [​IMG] versus [​IMG] , [​IMG]
     
  16. Oct 8, 2012 #16 of 121
    sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    14,599
    370
    Sep 5, 2006
    Allen, TX
    That's not the cursive G and S that I was taught. These are:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Oct 8, 2012 #17 of 121
    AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,787
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    Yeah, the url I entered for third image in post #15 had a typo in it and so it didn't show. I repaired it
     
  18. Oct 8, 2012 #18 of 121
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    8,451
    515
    May 17, 2010
    USA
    I voted yes. We as a society have become too dependent on technology and take it for granted as it always being available. There are two fictional scenarios to prove my point. The new TV series "Revolution" and the movie "The Book Of Eli". In reality both nature and mankind have demonstrated how quickly our technology can vanish for long durations of time (war, earthquakes, hurricanes, ect.). I attend yearly reunions with men I served in combat with. We keep in touch with each other between those reunions via hand written letters even though we all have the ability to use modern communication devices.
     
  19. Oct 8, 2012 #19 of 121
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone DBSTalk Club

    12,564
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    Our Elementary school focuses on cursive in the 4th grade.

    I still use cursive most of the time when I'm writing.
     
  20. Oct 8, 2012 #20 of 121
    Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

    4,900
    51
    Mar 22, 2004
    Indian...
    Anyone who has tried to read a doctor's handwriting on a prescription form should understand the need for teaching cursive and using it properly.
    Handwriting skills are still important and cursive should be taught in concert with printing.
     

Share This Page