1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Goodbye, Cursive?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Nick, Oct 8, 2012.

Should cursive writing continue to be taught in schools?

  1. Yes

    3 vote(s)
    3.2%
  2. No

    54 vote(s)
    56.8%
  3. Not sure

    38 vote(s)
    40.0%
  1. Oct 8, 2012 #21 of 121
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,609
    380
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    The advantage in cursive isn't in the strokes making the individual letter... but rather how you can flow from one letter to the next without having to life the pen (or pencil) from the page. That's where the speed comes... printing an individual letter is no more or less complicated really via cursive or traditional print.

    I don't write that much... and when I do, I agree it is mostly in places where I need to print, except when signing my name.

    Of course, as long as we sign our names... people will need to be able to sign their own name AND read other people's names... so I don't see why we wouldn't keep teaching this in schools. It really shouldn't take much time to teach cursive, so I don't know what all the time/effort they are talking about really is.

    I mean... once a kid can read and write (printing)... all you have to do is say "there are other ways to make the same letters"... I mean, even if they go to computers and never write again, there are hundreds of thousands of fonts out there... probably thousands in regular every-day use... so kids need to grasp early-on the concept that there are many styles to make the same letter... font-recognition... so I don't even see why there is any consideration of dropping cursive.

    I would argue in fact... they should really expand it and instead of just being cursive... expand it to a more encompassing study of calligraphy.
     
  2. Oct 8, 2012 #22 of 121
    Getteau

    Getteau Icon

    859
    10
    Dec 19, 2007
    Houston
    I think they should introduce it, teach children the letters and how to sign their name and then if the kids want to continue using it great. If not, let them go back to print.

    That's how they did it back when I was in school in the 70's and short of the time it was introduced when I was in early grade school, I never used it again. However, even though it would take me 10x the time, I could still write in cursive if I needed to. Now, reading someones bad cursive is a whole other story. I can make out most poorly written print. However, since I never use cursive, if your letters don't look exactly like I remember them from a million years ago, you might as well be writing in Latin for all I'm concerned.
     
  3. Oct 8, 2012 #23 of 121
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone DBSTalk Club

    12,564
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    Well, it's very easy to read my cursive writing as it's pretty clear, but you'd never be able to read my signature.
     
  4. Oct 8, 2012 #24 of 121
    Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

    9,406
    244
    Feb 12, 2009
    NY Hudson...
    Being the family genealogist, I can tell ya that the handwriting of census takers changed during the 30's. And as a genealogist, I really appreciated the switch because reading printed handwriting is a hell of a lot easier than reading script handwriting.
     
  5. Oct 8, 2012 #25 of 121
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

    21,866
    189
    Apr 23, 2002
    The...
    than
     
  6. Oct 8, 2012 #26 of 121
    Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

    9,406
    244
    Feb 12, 2009
    NY Hudson...
    If you plan to teach, please explain the difference.
     
  7. Oct 8, 2012 #27 of 121
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    45,749
    985
    Apr 17, 2003
    Michiana
    Sure ... teach cursive right alongside how to use a slide rule. :)

    No, cursive should not be required. Legible writing should be ... but cursive? Perhaps those afraid of losing cursive as an art form should also teach calligraphy. It is beautiful as an art form (although occasionally hard to read).

    I sign my name almost legibly ... no one cares. When I am forced to write it is legible. It probably should be better but no one cares as long as they can read it.
     
  8. Oct 8, 2012 #28 of 121
    AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,787
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    than is?
     
  9. Oct 9, 2012 #29 of 121
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,345
    578
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    Than- a comparison
    Then- indicates sequence
     
  10. Oct 9, 2012 #30 of 121
    Shades228

    Shades228 DaBears

    6,081
    45
    Mar 18, 2008
    I think cursive should be taught when it's appropriate to someone's educational choice. I do not think that it should be mandatory to learn. Kids don't write notes anymore they text. They don't write papers anymore they type them. Teacher's even prefer typed papers because it's easier and faster to grade. Much like the teaching of calligraphy it's time has passed for the general populace.
     
  11. Oct 9, 2012 #31 of 121
    AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,787
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    Doe- a deer, a female deer
    Ray- a drop of golden sun


    I can't find a than/then misuse anywhere in this thread.
     
  12. Oct 9, 2012 #32 of 121
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    Homework itself is not 'graded' (at least with the teacher) and the only credit (if you want to call it that) which one receives is for turning it in on time so having her do homework in cursive is a great way to keep her working on a skill which her 3rd grade teacher began teaching and one that we want her to learn. It is a very good chance that child will run across cursive in her lifetime. It could be old family documents, correspondences, Great Grandma White's recipe cards, etc. and it would be nice if the child could read what was on the paper.
     
  13. Oct 9, 2012 #33 of 121
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    and where did you go to school especially back in the 70's where cursive was just introduced and not required? I went to elementary school back in the 70's as well and remember it being beaten into our little brains beginning toward the end of second grade and by the time 4th grade rolled around every paper you turned in better be in cursive or else.
     
  14. Oct 9, 2012 #34 of 121
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    8,451
    515
    May 17, 2010
    USA
    The pot needs to stop calling the kettle black. In the "Are You Scientfically Literate" thread you erred in post#2. In your, not you're post you entered the word "christian" instead of "Christian" and were corrected by zkc16 in post #3. We all make mistakes Nick. ;)
     
  15. Oct 9, 2012 #35 of 121
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Oct 9, 2012 #36 of 121
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    8,451
    515
    May 17, 2010
    USA
    When one uses corrective criticism they had better be able to receive it. Getting back on topic, Yahoo reported a hand written letter written by Albert Einstein received a opening bid of three million dollars at a auction. I doubt if anyone's e-mail or text messages will ever be worth that much.
     
  17. Oct 9, 2012 #37 of 121
    sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    14,599
    370
    Sep 5, 2006
    Allen, TX
    Makes sense, I hadn't thought of it that way... thank you.
     
  18. Oct 9, 2012 #38 of 121
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    My kids don't text nor will that feature ever be enabled if they ever get a cell phone as long as I'm paying for it.

    With typed papers there is nothing to show that the child did the work themselves. At least with pen and paper spelling and grammer errors are not as easy to correct plus at least with pen and paper, I know it was little Johnny who wrote the paper and not Johnny's mom or dad over lunch. IMHO, It's LAZY teachers who prefer things typed out or submitted electronically.
     
  19. Oct 9, 2012 #39 of 121
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,609
    380
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    The "don't teach it because I hardly use it" argument is a slippery slope. There are many who would argue most math skills are not needed because of calculators and computers... and that kids should just be taught how to use those instead of understanding math. That would be a bad idea.

    There are also LOTS of things taught in school that most of us will not use on a regular basis unless we are in trivia contests or get to be on Jeopardy... so throw those out too... I mean, we should only be teaching things in school that will be used, say, at least 75% of the time by most adults.

    Get rid of art, music, physical education, health, history... most of those things won't make you money (at least not for most people)... so no need for those.

    Just teach people how to post to facebook and use twitter and send emails, and that covers the new "basics" right?

    :rolleyes:
     
  20. Oct 9, 2012 #40 of 121
    jdskycaster

    jdskycaster Legend

    272
    7
    Sep 1, 2008
    I am surprised there are more votes for keeping it yet the arguments why we should are weak to say the least.

    Keep it just in case there is an apocalypse? We can all still print right?

    Keep it so that my child can recognize different fonts on a computer? A simple mouse click and everything on the page is suddenly in a recognizable format.

    Keep it because it is faster? What? If I was forced to write something in cursive so others could read it then time is not a specific advantage.

    Keep it so that a teacher can authenticate homework? What year did you leave the modern educational system? My kids rarely if ever turn in a handwritten assignment now that they have completed their handwriting "training." Everything is either typed and printed or submitted electronically. The kids in the local Amish schools do continue to turn in handwritten assignments up and until they graduate from the 8th grade. :)

    Keep it so they can decipher antique family documents? If they are truly in a bind over this technology can do this for them as well. In the case of an apocalypse find any remaining baby boomer to help you out, pay them in vegetables.

    fluffybear,
    Been there, said that, vowed my kids would never have cell phones let alone use them for texting. Guess what, both of my kids have cellphones and use them for texting.

    Let us know how that works out for you when they reach their teen years.

    For clarification, I voted no.

    JD
     

Share This Page