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HD-DVD vs Blu-Ray War Thread - Update: Toshiba formally announces end of HD DVD

Discussion in 'The Movies' started by Nick, Apr 23, 2007.

  1. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Wait, wait, wait. Laser disks had a very long life from the 1978 until 2004. You can even still purchase new players today.

    Yes, while they never achieved the mass market status that VHS did, it had a much superior picture and did survive as a viable product.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  2. jims

    jims Legend

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    When I jumped into Hi-Def at Xmas, I was an inch away from getting a HD DVD and decided to get a PS3 first and HD DVD later. This thead for all of the bad has pointed out some of the strengths that HD DVD has had to me. I do love my PS3 because it gave me 3 things (Blueray, current set of games for my kids, and use of their previous set of games). I won't tell you the abuse my older PS2 took at the hands of my kids when they were younger, but enough said at a lot of juice.

    I enjoyed using my Beta Camcorder into the late 90's, so I do believe that the technology doesn't really die.

    I have come enjoy this site and unfortunately this thread has had an American Idol type of guilty pleasure on what people will say next. I do think that Chris and Stuart are two people who have tried to make lemonade out of lemons.

    The next couple of years will be interesting as the fight for DBS vs. Net vs. traditional media starts to unfold. And a point I was making in my last post is that the PS3, Directv, and PC type machines are now shifting towards wanting to be a media solution that recognizes other devices in themselves. I don't think there is one solution, as there had been in the past but think it is evolving.
     
  3. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I have several movies that I opted not to buy HD DVD upgrades for because either the movie wasn't *that* special to do so OR because the quality of my DVD was fine vs re-buying it. I can almost always see the better definition in HD vs SD, but it isn't always worth the additional cost.

    For new movies, I was buying HD DVD instead of SD... but I was also buying SD for some things that I couldn't get on HD. I also buy lots of TV-on-DVD so, aside from more recent shows that are airing in HD... the DVDs are just fine for the "classics" to me.
     
  4. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    This is an aspect I hope becomes true for HD DVD as well.. There are still existing movies I want to buy, hoping for some of the already-announced releases as well.. and anticipating some Imports from Europe. In the meantime between now and when/if Blu ray becomes a cheaper option in a year or two.. I'd like to be able to get a few more new HD DVD movies to add to my collection if some of the Import studios continue to support the format.
     
  5. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    I'll just let the family buy me gifts of their favorite movies on Blu. Otherwise I'm almost as hard to shop for as my wife... :)
     
  6. syphix

    syphix Hall Of Fame

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    I'm not so sold on that train of thought. Remember: we're all "geeks" on this forum. We tend to adopt new technology a lot quicker than the average person. And I believe the "average person" still likes to have a physical medium to watch movies off of, even if they DO have VOD. The DRM and closed platform that VOD/digital delivery has (i.e., I can't borrow a movie from a friend, they can't borrow one from me, etc.) makes me not a full fledged fan. Plus, there are MANY Americans that simply don't have the bandwidth that VOD/digital delivery requires (my highest speed internet available is 1.5 mbps...FAR too slow for true VOD...especially HD VOD).

    I like Warner Brothers' thought process. According to Digital Bits, they're going "balls to the wall" with Blu-ray:
    Plus, if I buy a movie, I don't want to have to trust that the hard drive it sits on is not going to die. The chance that that hard drive will die? 100%, over a fairly short period. The chance my physical disc will be destroyed? 100%, over a fairly LONG period. The movie studios would LOVE a completely digital delivery model, so they can control it more. That alone puts a bad taste in MY mouth.
     
  7. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Day-and-date released should have been happening from day one, in my opinion. There's lots of stuff I have held back buying on DVD waiting to see if there would be an HD DVD of... This has been one of my complaints about both HD DVD and Blu ray from inception. They just haven't been releasing enough movies.

    The studios are playing chicken-or-the-egg... they don't want to release a big movie until they have consumers in large quantity to buy the HD version... but until they release the big movies, people keep sitting on the fence waiting. This, in my opinion, has kept more people on the fence than any "confusion" about the "war".
     
  8. dhhaines

    dhhaines Hall Of Fame

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    That's my biggest complaint about digital media that is not a hard copy in my hand. I've had a lot of harddrives fail over the years, but I've NEVER had a CD/DVD/HD-DVD/BLU-RAY Disc fail.

    I want the hardcopy
     
  9. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Dripping...
    Just rent them then. Hopefully NetFlix will be able to keep up with BD request (which they aren't now) since the 'war' us just about over.
     
  10. Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I can understand where you guys are coming from and I agree. The thing with digital downloads though is that the movie does not sit on your hard drive. It sits in a off-site digital library and you download it as needed. These libraries will continue to grow and make a very viable alternative to storing your own media.

    It is true thought that most "regular users" still rely on hard media but the first manufacturer to make digital downloads cheap and easy and available to most everyone will get the pot of gold.
     
  11. cartrivision

    cartrivision Hall Of Fame

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    Are those old stockpiled "new" players or does someone still manufacuture LD players today?
     
  12. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    Old formats have a way of resurfacing. In the 1990s, Beta was used for broadcasting, and Select-A-Vision discs and digital audio tapes were used for data storage. Who knows what use HD-DVD technology will show up in.
     
  13. syphix

    syphix Hall Of Fame

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    I completely agree on that point...but I believe that it is at LEAST one more physical format away. I do whole heartedly believe that Blu-ray is the LAST physical medium for movies for consumers, just as CD is for music. A widespread, FAST, reliable, easy and cheap form of digital downloads will be next. But I don't think that's gonna happen for 8+ years when WiMax, etc. is fully implemented nationwide (i.e., "boonies" included).

    We should see a nice 10-12 year lifespan for Blu-ray, same as what DVD has/will have (DVD's are only 10 years old...). I'll be sad when physical media dies, though...as a collector, I appreciate having the actual disc and case.
     
  14. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Yep... I'm not advocating piracy by any means... but I do think there could be a market (albeit a smaller one) for HD DVD recordables for the home user who is making his own movies OR for compiling various downloaded freebie clips.
     
  15. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I have said before, so I'll say again... I sincerely hope that we do not go to downloadable-only. I loved MP3 when it came out as an option for music on my computer but still prefer buying CDs. I like my archived Dish DVR recordings, but I would not pay for a download that by its very nature is transient and potentially short-lived. I want a physical media.

    So... I hope Blu ray does take off, although I've gone on record as being a fence-sitter until it does.
     
  16. Jason Nipp

    Jason Nipp Analog Geek in a Digital World Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    Up till now, I wasn't what one could really label as a fence sitter, however I have limited my investment on movies for both formats.

    Next stop... Walmart to buy the Die Hard 4 movie BD set..... ;)

    The thing I wanna know is... will Lucas sit on the fence like he did with DVD? If I recall correctly he lost his a$$ on LD.... and it took him many years to get the trilogy on DVD..... Seeing that remastered to HD might be pretty cool.... As long as it's not the CGI stuff that he did in the DVD special editions.
     
  17. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Somewhere around 2001 I interviewed with a Sony startup company that was building a digital library for ALL your music, no matter what form you had originally purchased: LP, CD, MP3, etc. Their goal was to manage all the DRM for all your needs so you could play streams of your music to any compatible device.

    Company didn't succeed (and I'm glad I didn't pursue the job.) But the concept might resurrect itself someday. As long as DRM continues, someone who makes it completely hidden and easy to the normal legitimate users has a chance and that could be an enabler for downloadable content.

    As an example, I have about 10 MP3s with DRM that I got free. The original licenses are on a laptop, two laptops ago. Now I have the pain to migrate the licenses to the current laptop if I want to use them again. :( I'd much rather rip a CD and be done with it.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  18. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Lucas refused to issue DVDs until his "masterpiece" was done the way he wanted it way back in 1978.

    Don't have a clue as to why he's waiting this time.
     
  19. Steve Mehs

    Steve Mehs Hall Of Fame

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    Burn to CD, rerip as MP3, new files, same music, no DRM, takes all of 3 minutes.
     
  20. syphix

    syphix Hall Of Fame

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    Generation loss.

    Probably easier: search Google. Crack the DRM*.

    We're starting to see a "grassroots" effort (and response in the marketplace) for a DRM-free world in music. Perhaps in the future, the MPAA....ahh....forget it...it was a pipedream...

    *This was provided as an example. Proceed at your own risk.
     

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