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HD Lite definition...

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by batsona, Oct 31, 2007.

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  1. batsona

    batsona New Member

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    Can someone give me a good dictionary definition of "HD Lite"? I'm guessing it's a colloquial term used to describe the picture quality of an "HD" broadcast when it appears up-converted from 720 or 480 source.

    I've also gathered that it it pertains to some channels, and not to others. I need to understand this, before I think about moving to DirecTV.

    Is there a sacrifice in PQ, in order to have access to the 70+ channels with D*? Can someone calm my fears? :eek2:
     
  2. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Try Wiki.
     
  3. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Actually... the Term HD-Lite, refers to when the source image is altered to a lower resolution... somewhere between 720 and 1080i.

    HD-Lite does not refer to UPCONVERTING of non-HD material to HD.
     
  4. Xing

    Xing Legend

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    The HD channels that broadcast in HD are great quality. HD Lite does refer to a down converted picture. Some of the new HD channels are not broadcasting HD yet so D* upconverts some of the programs. Lastly, 720 is HD there is no reason to upconvert from 720 unless your going to 1080P.
     
  5. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Actually, the term addressing alteration of source signal in any type what degrade picture quality, like reduced resolution, reduced bandwidth, over-compression, etc.
     
  6. msmith198025

    msmith198025 Member of the Year

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    they have given you a definition.
    Some people used in to describe the older mpeg 2 channels D* was sending out. Doesnt apply at this point to the new Mpeg 4 channels
     
  7. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Then by that definition... every consumer level source of HD is HD-LITE
    As every one is compressed, which degrades picture quality.


    Bottom line: HD-Lite doesn't have an EXACT definition, as it is a term that has been thrown around to classify different HD signals that are not as PURE as they can be.

    Different individuals/groups ect... have added cavats and additional criteria to classify things as HD-Lite to suit their arguments.

    So there is no EXACT definition of HD-Lite... it simply a generic term that is used in discussion of primarily DirecTV MPEG-2 HD channels and also now more often with Dish Networks HD offerings...
     
  8. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    HD Lite: [Eych Dee Lyte] An "invented" slang term used to describe a transmitted signal for High Definition video communications that does not meet the speaker's expectations for pristine point-to-point broadcast and video content migration. The use of this term can be thrown around to include any signal that is in any way compressed, reduced from 1080i or higher resolution, and/or delivered in anything less than theoretically perfect condition. Based on its overly-simplified abusive definition, it may actually describe any current HD broadcast found in the United States by any provider. Also see "Fantasy Broadcast Perfection". :D
     
  9. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    Actually thats the best definition I have seen to date....priceless.

    There are many intermediate standards for "HD". And many who constantly complained about HD-Lite were using a very strict definition, saying if a signal wasnt being broadcast in 1280x720p, or 1920x1080i, it wasnt HD.

    The other situation that was constantly talked about was when some providers were sending out a particular station at 1920x1080i, but D* might have been sending the signal out as 1440x1080i. Though the actual complainers may not have been able to see any visible difference due to the reduced resolution, the difference was more related to bitstarving, they complained anyway because they felt they were being ripped off...
     
  10. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Probably the most accurate one so far.

    "Lite" as used in versions of software that aren't "full featured" as their more expensive product.
    "Compression" as with digital images [JPEG] can degrade picture quality by "over compression", but by the nature of it, use some amount of compression.
    Bandwidth isn't unlimited causing trade offs between numbers of channels offered and amount used for each channel.
    Bit rate/bit starving: OTA maximum is 19.2 Mb/s MPEG-2, something less is "starved" [by some standards]. MPEG-4 uses an alternate encoding method and uses a smaller bit rate.
     
  11. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    Great definition, HDTVfan... it makes my point exactly, that it's a meaningless term used when one is dissatisfied with one's picture quality for any reason.
     
  12. Doug Brott

    Doug Brott Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    It seems to me that the biggest use of the term is describing too much compression on the video signal .. basically trying to squeeze a watermelon through a keyhole and make it look like a watermelon on the other side.

    Yes, I am over-simplifying it even more by not even considering resolutions, but that is the way I take it anyway.
     
  13. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    For MPEG-2 resolution reduction is used. 1920 x 1080 becomes 1280 x 1080 & 640 x 480 becomes 480 x 480. Both of these are squished [if you were to see them] and then "un-squished" before outputting to the display. This may be the "over compression" as there is a loss of 1/4-1/3 of the original image detail.
     
  14. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    And there is the biggest problem - you can't restore lost pixels after altering resolution ( 1920x1080 to 1280x1080 or to 1440x1080 ) for non-compressed picture ( take JPEG for example ), I'm not telling about motion pictures.
    There is hiding big lie of the "true" or something HD by all providers.

    They're play with your eyes, tossing standards in favor of profit.
     
  15. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Oh brother...

    There is not one single source of HD material... on the consumer level... that doesn't use compression.

    Thus EVERY SINGLE BIT OF HD is tossing "standards" in favor of profit.
    OTA, DBS, Cable-Co, even the optical media formats..

    All of them...

    TV in general is a "trick" on your eyes... the older technolgoies that had the three dots so close to gether of different colors... so at a distance your focal point would blend them all.

    My Plasma... is individual pixel points... which stand nose to the screen you see the individual pixels... but stand back...your focal point on your eye, blends it all.

    Without compression... we would not have HD....
     
  16. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Ar thu brother ? :)

    I'm not diving into still pictures, it was a point of using [too] _liberal_ resizing/compression methods, behind standards - and you know what I'm talking about.
    Don't make my words twisted to the meaningless point, please.
     
  17. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    As you've seen from the other posts in this thread, there are as many ways to define and discuss "HD Lite" as there are people to do so.

    Bottom line is, watch the picture and see if it is acceptable to you or not. I personally find the mpeg4 encoded HD channels from DirecTV to be indistinguishable from over the air or cable equivalents where I have done a/b comparisons. I thoroughly enjoy DirecTV's HD offerings. I think you will also.

    Carl
     
  18. Greg Alsobrook

    Greg Alsobrook Lifetime Achiever

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    well said
     
  19. Milominderbinder2

    Milominderbinder2 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '08

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    To see an example of HD Lite, look at what HBO did to Batman:

    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt... post11536873

    It is not just that they have cropped every side.

    Look at the color depth. Look at the resolution.

    Seriously, watch a real HD movie on MGM to see what HD is supposed to look like.

    - Craig
     
  20. dave1234

    dave1234 Icon

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    As another poster noted HD-lite is a SLANG term. It has little or no usefull actual definition. It means whatever the writer decides it means to them at the time. The Wiki entry illustrates this very well.
    In my opinion it's a useless term.
     
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