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HDMI Splitter / Remote

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by stevetanneyhill, Dec 3, 2010.

  1. Dec 3, 2010 #1 of 17
    stevetanneyhill

    stevetanneyhill Mentor

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    Hi,

    I have an HR-24. I'd like to split the signal using and HDMI splitter. TV #1 is right next to the box and will require a short (3 foot) HDMI Cord. TV #2 is relatively close as well and will require a 15 foot cord. I have 2 questions:

    1. Since the cord runs are fairly short. Will a passive HDMI splitter like this one do the trick? Or will I need a powered HDMI splitter? Or should I use a switch in reverse for best reliability (I've read that switches can be used in reverse)?

    2. Since TV #2 will be in a room away from the HR-24, will I need to get an RF remote, or is the remote that came with the HR-24 RF capable? (I can't seem to figure that out).

    Thanks so much!
     
  2. Dec 3, 2010 #2 of 17
    azarby

    azarby Hall Of Fame

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    This may work, but when driving protected content to two destinations, which destinatoin device will provide the proper handshake back to the DVR?
     
  3. Dec 3, 2010 #3 of 17
    stevetanneyhill

    stevetanneyhill Mentor

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    Hmmmm. I don't know. I may be out of my depth. My plan is to only use one tv at a time. Does that make your question less important?
     
  4. Dec 3, 2010 #4 of 17
    BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Do NOT NOT NOT waste your money on one of these. 90+% of the time, they will not work properly, and have sometimes caused damage to the TV/source box's HDMI. They really only work reliably (ha!) on two idential TVs, identical down to the firmware revision.

    Do yourself a huge favor and spend the $20 or whatever for an active splitter.
     
  5. Dec 3, 2010 #5 of 17
    wallybarthman

    wallybarthman Godfather

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    This is complicated, because HDMI and HDCP (the copy protection scheme) is wildly unpredictable, depending on the box, the TV, and the splitter.

    Here's what I would recommend.

    1) If you can - just use HDMI and Component. Two separate outputs to two different TVs.
    2) If you only want to use HDMI, get an active splitter. In my experience (albeit limited) an active splitter will work fine even if only one TV is turned on. Passive splitters are NEVER worth it - never ever worth it. When they work they only work if one TV is one. But sometimes if only one TV is on then it won't work - but if two TVs are hooked up it won't pass HDCP either.
     
  6. Dec 6, 2010 #6 of 17
    stevetanneyhill

    stevetanneyhill Mentor

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    I could certainly do component to the main tv, but should I worry about some HD content being downgraded to SD? Again, I'm a little out of my depth, but I've read that this may happen for copy protection reasons.

    Oh and does anyone know if the remote that I currently have will operate in RF mode, or do I need to buy a new one?
     
  7. Dec 6, 2010 #7 of 17
    Richierich

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  8. Dec 6, 2010 #8 of 17
    Joe C

    Joe C Godfather

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    Use a powered HDMI splitter from Monoprice and you should be fine at the cable lenghts you mentioned. My longest runs after the splitter are 50' and I don't have any problems.
     
  9. Dec 7, 2010 #9 of 17
    stevetanneyhill

    stevetanneyhill Mentor

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    Mar 20, 2007
    Thanks for the help everyone!

    OK, now one last issue:

    I have an RC65RX remote that I currently use to operate the HR 24 DVR (I'm assuming it's operating in IR mode). If I want to use one remote and shuttle it between the two televisions, do I have to change the remote to work in RF mode only, or can the remote work in both RF and IR modes (IR mode when it's in the room with the HR 24 and RF when it's in the other room)?

    If I decide to get a second remote (to have a dedicated remote for each tv), do I have to set them both to RF, or will the receiver respond to both IR and RF remotes (i.e. use an IR remote in the room with the receiver and an RF remote in the room without the receiver). I think the IR/RF setup would be preferable for battery/remote cost issues.

    Thanks!
     
  10. Joe C

    Joe C Godfather

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    Mar 2, 2005
    You would need to have all the remotes in RF mode to control the HR24. Then use a RC65 at each TV like you want to and program it to control the TV in the respective rooms and your set. I have 4 TVs connected to my HR22so I have 4 remotes throughout the house all in RF mode to control the HR.
     
  11. stevetanneyhill

    stevetanneyhill Mentor

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    Mar 20, 2007
    Great! Thanks for the help!
     
  12. stevetanneyhill

    stevetanneyhill Mentor

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    Mar 20, 2007
    I've looked around for an additiona RC65RX, but they run around 20 bucks. Could I use this RC64R (which is less expensive) to control the second tv (and use the RC65RX that i already have with the first tv)? Or do I have to buy another (more expensive) RC65RX?
     
  13. sungam

    sungam Legend

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    Any RF capable remote will work... e.g., RC64R or RB; RC65R, RB or RX etc. The R means RF, the B backlit buttons and the X has two-way communication when programming with the '24 series receivers. The newer the series the more TVs and other devices the remote knows.
     
  14. stevetanneyhill

    stevetanneyhill Mentor

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    Mar 20, 2007
    Great! Thanks!
     
  15. Beerstalker

    Beerstalker Hall Of Fame

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    As far as I know no cable company or satellite company has said anything about downgrading the component outputs to 480i/p.

    Blu-Ray players and upscaling DVD players are the only devices I know of where they have talked about limits like this. Upscaling DVD players have been limited to 480p over component since day one because of the DVD alliance's demands. They could only upscale to 720/1080 over HDMI (unless you had one of the few that could bypass this restriction or just flat out ignored the DVD alliances rules).

    Blu Ray players all have the circuitry for the image constraint token built into them. If a movie company decides to turn on the ICT flag on their Blu-Ray disc the Blu-Ray player will be limited to 480i/p output for that disc over component and you will have to use HDMI to get the full resolution. Last I knew the studios had all pretty much agreed not to use the ICT flag until 2012 (There were a couple of releases where it was supposedly truned on by accident though).

    I believe that the CE Companies have all decided to stop putting component outputs on their Blu-Ray players starting next year to help get people ready for the ICT flag to start getting used more often. I would just run component video to the closest TV and HDMI to the other and save yourself the cost and complexity of the HDMI splitter.

    Still, like I said before I have not heard of any cable/satellite company enforcing anything like this. I don't even think they have anything like the ICT system built into them.
     
  16. BattleZone

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    You bet that Sat receivers have HDCP and ICT support built into them, and have, as required by law since 2001.

    Part of the DMCA is the "analog sunset" (Google the term), which essentially says that as of 1/1/2011, no NEWLY DESIGNED HD video device can have analog outputs. That means, for example, a Blu-Ray player or HD camera put into production after 12/31/2010 cannot have HD analog outputs, so if you have a non-HDCP-compliant TV or monitor, you'll have to buy an existing design, and you'll be locked out of any newer models.

    And, as of 1/1/2013, even EXISTING HD video devices can no longer be produced if they have HD analog outputs.

    So, there is a clock on the useful lifespans of non-HDCP-compliant devices and analog inputs (think: HD-PVR, for example). And most manufacturers will choose to eliminate analog outputs entirely, since it makes little sense to spend the money to include them when they are limited to SD resolution.
     
  17. judgemalloy

    judgemalloy New Member

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    Dec 12, 2010
    Actually, "analog sunset" is part of the Advanced Access Content System (AACS) license agreement and applies only to Blu-ray players and the now defunct HDTV players. Likewise, the image constraint token (ICT) only applies to Blu-ray players. The ICT could have legally been used all along, however, movie studios agreed to delay the ICT was because it would have limited the marketability of Blu-ray discs.

    Sat and cable boxes are regulated by the FCC. FCC rules forbid turning off or downscaling analog outputs for any broadcast signal.

    However, an exception has arisen to this, thanks to lobbying efforts by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), aka the movie studios. The MPAA lobbied the FCC to allow a broadcast constraint token (BCT), but have been denied by the FCC. However, the FCC did agree to allow “Selectable Output Control” for video on demand (VOD) services for first run movies that have not yet been released to DVD or Blu-ray. Also, the token must expire after 90 days or until the disc is released, whichever occurs first.
     

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