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HDMI splitter

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by JoeF, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. JoeF

    JoeF Legend

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    Aug 20, 2007
    I would like to send an HD signal from one receiver to 3 different TV's. Would an HDMI splitter be the best way to do this? The runs are about 75', 45' and 35'. I've noticed that there are huge price variations in the splitters any where from $100 to well over $500.
     
  2. dave29

    dave29 New Member

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    Feb 18, 2007
    Are you talking about an HDMI Switch?

    I don't know of any that will run the signal in reverse, like you are talking about.

    I know you can get Matrix Switches. But most of those that I have ever seen are 4x2's, so you could only feed 2 TV's.
     
  3. JoeF

    JoeF Legend

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    Aug 20, 2007
  4. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    Frankly you would be better off with running component via a component splitter. That 75' run in particular would be very interesting with HDMI...could work or could not work at all.

    Reasons:
    -Component cabling and splitters are cheaper.
    -No HDMI Handshaking issues which can cause problems with different audio types and resolutions as well as getting things to work at all.
    -Easier to do longer runs, HDMI gets finicky at anything over 40-50ft.

    Cons:
    -Component cannot do 1080p/24 from Directv receivers (but it is really only for select PPV at this point).
    -Component is a bit bigger to run vs. the HDMI wire.
     
  5. dave29

    dave29 New Member

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  6. JoeF

    JoeF Legend

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    Aug 20, 2007
    I just measured the longest run (measure twice cut once). Tried to take the shortest route and not leave too much slack. I think I can get it under 50'.

    The only thing I have against using component, is that on of the TV's is an undercounter in a kitchen and I really don't want to fish 5 cables thru the cabinet.
     
  7. dave29

    dave29 New Member

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  8. dave29

    dave29 New Member

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    Now that I think about it......

    As long as it is a powered splitter, I probably wouldn't worry about the long run.
     
  9. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    Jan 10, 2007
    It still can be finicky, even powered, over around 50ft.

    Plus as I said earlier, HDMI handshake issues can be a problem.


    It may all work fine though, only one way to tell. I would definitely recommend testing the setup BEFORE fishing it into the walls and cabinets ;)
     
  10. dave29

    dave29 New Member

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    I agree!

    I have found that any length HDMI on a splitter can be finicky. Switches on the other hand are pretty stable.
     
  11. Richierich

    Richierich Hall Of Fame

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    Jan 10, 2008
    Mine just went out so I am buying a 1X4 Powered HDMI Splitter from Monoprice.com

    http://www.monoprice.com/products/p...=10113&cs_id=1011301&p_id=4922&seq=1&format=2

    Mine has lasted for about a year but finally crapped out.

    Here is another one but more expensive.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0..._m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=00RBAEDYYM4DYCFFTCFJ

    I have a 75' run and have not had any problems with it until this past week. I had the HDP-104 model which has been replaced.

    Here is another powered 1X4 HDMI Splitter from Monoprice.

    http://www.monoprice.com/products/p...=10113&cs_id=1011301&p_id=6193&seq=1&format=2
     
  12. JoeF

    JoeF Legend

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    Aug 20, 2007
    OK. Here's the rookie question of the day...

    What's the difference between a splitter and a switch? Advantages /disadvantages for what I'm trying to do?
     
  13. Richierich

    Richierich Hall Of Fame

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    A Splitter splits the signal so you can view that signal at 2 or 4 or more locations depending on how many ports the splitter supports.

    I send the signal to my Bedroom Plasma and also to my Bathroom LCD and when I am in the bathroom ai can change the channel with my remote from the bathroom area.
     
  14. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    A splitter splits one video input to multiple displays.
    A switch allows multiple video inputs to a single display (useful when you dont have enough HDMI ports on your display).

    Switches used to be very common when TVs were coming with only 1 or maybe sometimes 2 HDMI ports. These days most are coming with 3+ HDMI ports so less and less are needing to use them.
     
  15. JoeF

    JoeF Legend

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    Aug 20, 2007
    Ahhh, I definitely need a splitter not a switch. Good advice about testing before I run wire in the wall. Thanks to all for the help!!!
     
  16. MountainMan10

    MountainMan10 Icon

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    Jan 30, 2008
    If you want to consider running component google "Rapid Run Cables". These combine the component cables into a single easy to run cable. I use them for a long component run.
     
  17. cconrad

    cconrad New Member

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    Nov 29, 2009
    A HDMI switch allows the user to select multiple sources, such as Blu-ray players and game consoles into one HDTV monitor.

    A passive HDMI splitter can be a simple Y-cable that takes a single high definition input and connects it to two or more output devices (displays).

    Splitter/ switch combinations (HDMI matrix) are also available that will let you select which source is routed to which display.
     
  18. dave29

    dave29 New Member

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    I believe that was already covered.
     
  19. xmguy

    xmguy New Member

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    Middle, TN
    I'm not trying to thread jack but can component cables transmit at 1080i? I currently use 25FT HDMI to my TV and wonder if I would see any improvement.
     
  20. dave29

    dave29 New Member

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    You are better off with the HDMI that you already have compared to a component cable.
     

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