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HELP- Need HR20 power consumption

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Davenlr, Oct 19, 2007.

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  1. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Not in manual, directv doesn't know... Does anyone know the watt rating of the HR20 with a 5 lnb dish? Need it to size a UPS purchase.
     
  2. armophob

    armophob Difficulty Concen........

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    Any home computer based UPS is fine. If you wan't to protect your tv as well, I would get a 1000 to 15oowatt rated one.
     
  3. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Well, 48" lcd, hr20, H20, 100watt surround amp, dvd recorder, 2.2ghz htpc, 3 external drives... Have all the watt ratings except the HR20, and it adds up. I'm close to the "home" cutoff, and can't afford the commercial one, so deciding it I want a big home or just a small one for the hr20 by itself.
     
  4. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    IIRC it is 48 watts on and 45 watts in standby(off)
     
  5. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Thanks.
     
  6. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    As a sidenote, buy as large as you feel you can afford, it will give you the longest runtime during a power outage. I have a 1300va APC unit that will run it and my eSATA enclosure for a little over 3 hours....
     
  7. Neil Derryberry

    Neil Derryberry Hall Of Fame

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    be careful not to go too big.. I ran a 3000va apc rack unit just because I had one spare and it killed me on my power bill. I should have seen it coming..
     
  8. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Thanks for all the input. I bought a 1500va (865 watts) APC with digital display. The H20 and HR20 together were 85 watts. Kicked on the TV, surround amp, and computer and I'm sitting at 50 per cent load with an estimated runtime of 10 minutes...more than enough time to run out to the garage and fire up the generator. Or I can just turn off the tv/amp and computer and let the HR20 do its thing for a long long long time.

    As for the power bill, does this thing run on the battery all the time and use a/c to charge it, or run off a/c and switch to battery during a power outage? Curious how it could use to much more power than the devices plugged in + a battery charger??
     
  9. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    I guess I'm slightly curious about that as well. My understanding of how they work should make them only use enough power to actually run the devices, and keep the batteries charged, which in most cases should be reasonably nominal.
     
  10. bobshults

    bobshults AllStar

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    According to the manufacturer's tag affixed to the bottom of the unit, power consumption is 70 watts max.
     
  11. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    The UPS units are constantly charging the battery which is powering the equipment. This is how you get the nice constant flow of clean power.
    Unfortunately, battery chargers tend to be inefficient. Notice how your UPS gets warm...there goes some of your power.

    I know they've been working on efficiency, but I believe that they can be as low as 50% efficient on cheaper UPS and worse on things like battery chargers, phone chargers, etc.

    Here's some information...

    http://www.efficientproducts.org/reports/bchargers/NRDC-Ecos_Battery_Charger_Efficiency.pdf
     
  12. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    They tend to not be very efficient battery chargers, but that is not their primary function. They spend most of their life maintaining the battery at a full state of charge which requires very little power consumption, a few watts even on larger units. The heat given off is from monitoring circuits, but it will get very warm recharging a unit with a depleted battery.
     
  13. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    The 70 watts is the most the charging circuit can consume, which equates to about 6 amps at 12 volts, average for a medium bettery charger.
     
  14. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    Right, but any heat created is efficiency lost...unless, of course, you need a room heater :)
     
  15. KCCardsfan

    KCCardsfan Godfather

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    This is correct according to my UPS.
     
  16. flipptyfloppity

    flipptyfloppity New Member

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    UPSes haven't worked that way in a long time. The first of the new-style of UPSes came into existence in the mid-80s.

    Modern UPSes are technically actually "standby power systems". That is, when the wall power is good, the wall power is just passed through surge protection and to the load. Meanwhile it constantly "tops off" the batteries. When the device notices the wall power is bad (too low, too high, bad frequency, just nutty), it switches over to running an inverter off the batteries (just like you'd buy for your car) to supply the load.

    UPSes do take a significant amount of power, even when just passing power/charging.

    Buying a 1500VA UPS to run an 80W device doesn't make a lot of sense. Not only will it cost you extra money, but the UPS systems themselves in high-output UPSes are not designed to run low power loads well, so they won't get appreciably longer (or actually, even shorter) runtime than a smaller one. It's tough to say exactly where the knee of the curve is, but you will likely find a 800VA unit won't run your 80W device much longer than a 500VA unit and a 1500VA unit might be worse than both.
     
  17. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    ff,

    Thanks for the info. So the batteries are just constantly on a trickle charge?
     
  18. flipptyfloppity

    flipptyfloppity New Member

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    Yes, in steady-state, the unit is just there trickle charging the batteries and feeding input power to output.

    Of course, during and after a power outage, it enters various states of running an inverter and fast charging.

    Lead-acid batteries prefer to be left on constant charge, so they're perfect for this use. Most other types of batteries load capacity over time if left on constant charge.
     
  19. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    I am not doubting your info, but I don't fully understand it. I have had alot of experience with inverters (RV's) and the larger the battery capacity the longer the run time. A UPS is nothing more than a small inverter. Inverters in motorhomes are automatic in the same way. Interupt line voltage, unplug from grid or shut down the generator, and they switch over uniterrupted. The larger the bank of batteries the longer devices in the coach can run.
     
  20. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    I got the 1500va unit because its not only for the HR20 but also a XP media server, 1TB network drive, dsl modem and wireless router, 48" lcd tv and a surround amp plus a 15watt flourescent emergency lamp... and I need the protection because the power output from the generator isn't all that clean or stable. Power is usually out here for up to 4 hrs after a big storm, and up to 5 days after an ice storm. The A/C already runs the electric bill up over $200 in the summer, what's an extra $10 for the big battery charger :) Least I don't have to sweat now if a storm comes through when I'm not home to unplug my system.
     
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