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Home Owner's Associations (HOA), Why?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Apr 24, 2013.

  1. Apr 25, 2013 #41 of 114
    Rich

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    I believe you're correct. They weren't called HOAs, they were called committees or Soviets and that's how the Soviet Union began. With people garnering favor by ratting out their neighbors. That didn't turn out so well.

    Rich
     
  2. Apr 25, 2013 #42 of 114
    Rich

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    You do that in NJ and someone sees you and you're taken to court and labeled a sex offender. For discreetly performing a badly needed bodily function.

    Rich
     
  3. Apr 25, 2013 #43 of 114
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

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    At least someone's following along and paying attention.

    Bull.

    If you don't like HOA's and even if it were true that that's all there is where you live, move. You've already stated "there are lots of jobs". If you think you have to live in a new home in a nice neighborhood, then abide by rules the other homeowners would like to have. If you don't, don't. Of the millions of homes in the US, the vast majority are not covered by HOA's. Don't claim that my right to live in a community with owners that have similar objectives is taking away your rights, cause that's BS and you know it.
     
  4. Apr 25, 2013 #44 of 114
    Rich

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    Why, is what I'm trying to learn. Is it fear? Do people feel safer in a controlled community? Or are there underlying reasons? I've been to my brother-in-law's home many times and the development looks like something out of a science fiction story. Huge McMansions on small lots, in some parts you can see into every back yard, so there's no privacy there. All the homes have the same, or nearly the same color of vinyl siding, the houses with dogs have split rail fences with other fencing fabrics tacked on to them to keep the dogs in the yards. That's allowed, but a nice, expensive plastic fence isn't.

    And, what bothers me about his development is that I don't see any faces that aren't white.

    Rich
     
  5. Apr 25, 2013 #45 of 114
    Holydoc

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    When you come into my neighborhood, all the lawns are manicured, the houses kept up, and no cars parked in yards. The neighborhood beside us has grown up yards, trailers on blocks, and some houses that look like sheds. Our neighborhood has three HO pools (1 heated for winter), 6 tennis courts, 2 racquetball courts, 2 baseball fields, a picnic and camping area, 2 boat docks, a gym, and a party pavillion where you can bring your family or have functions by the beach. The neighborhood beside us has none of these amenities. I pay an HOA fee and agree that I will keep my yard and house in good shape. My friends in the other neighborhood laugh at me for paying an HOA fee and brag about being free. My house is roughly the same size as my friend's in the neighborhood beside us, but my house would list for nearly twice what his would sell for.


    I have lived in the neighborhoods without HOAs for my entire life up until the last five years. I would not live in a neighborhood without one now.
     
  6. Apr 25, 2013 #46 of 114
    Rich

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  7. Apr 25, 2013 #47 of 114
    dpeters11

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    Some people also like the simplicity of having things chosen for them. No need to figure out a paint scheme for the house, use the approved colors, curtains etc.

    Right now a co-worker is having to work through his HOA for approval to replace his roof, with the same color shingles. He also isn't allowed to have any professional work (electrician, plumber, lawn care etc.) done on a weekend unless it's an emergency. This rule was added after he moved there. Some HOAs are OK. others are just crazy.
     
  8. Apr 25, 2013 #48 of 114
    Rich

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    OK, now the TS wants to know why there are HOAs for single family homes. I should have made myself clearer in my OP.
     
  9. Apr 25, 2013 #49 of 114
    Rich

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    We've always got a lot of new homes being built in our township. Since NJ has so many regulations against heavy industries, the new construction is necessary for the tax base. You simply cannot run a chemical company or it's ilk in most parts of the state. So, we've turned into a service state. Here, you can buy a newly constructed home without having to join an HOA quite easily. We're also putting up a lot of condo communities, I'd think they have HOAs, but they're mostly transient folks who aren't gonna live in the condos for a long time.

    Rich
     
  10. Apr 25, 2013 #50 of 114
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

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    The point is that every HOA is different, but yet those against HOA's figure they're all the same.

    In my current one, for example, we don't have a restriction on parking boats in the driveway - as long as it doesn't extend into the sidewalk. We don't have a restriction on parking cars in the street at night (although I wish we did), but where my Dad lives it's against the city code (he doesn't have an HOA). All the homes are brick, so there's no restriction on painting or siding. All the homes do have 6' privacy fences (pretty common everywhere in the Dallas area), and if you want a fence, that's the type you need to have (not a big deal since that's the way they were all built). We do have restrictions on the size of structures you can put in the backyard (can't be more than 10' high IIRC), and a few other things, but it's mostly about not having your trash cans in the street all the time (they can't be in view), and not having an unkempt lawn, and things like that.

    Regarding the "faces that aren't white" comment, my next door neighbors on one side are black, the other side is Asian, and the people across the street are Indian. We only have about 50 homes in our neighborhood and I'd say about 60% of them are white.

    We have a lot of kids in the neighborhood and they play out front all the time with the other kids. And yes, I do feel better knowing they're not going to run into trash cans, or vehicles on the sidewalk when riding their bikes or scooters. I also feel better about that fact that when they're running across lawns, they're not running through patches of knee high weeds and whatever else. It's also nice having a community pool that we use on the weekends, without worrying about the upkeep on a pool in my backyard. It's a community. Maybe not for everyone, but great for us.
     
  11. Apr 25, 2013 #51 of 114
    Rich

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    One of the things I asked my brother-in-law was how he could give up his freedom of choice so easily. His answer was despicable and I can't repeat it here. It had too many racial overtones. My brother, on the other hand, when asked that same question said he didn't realize what he was getting into.

    I think we should hold onto our freedoms as long as we can. I can't imagine being governed by both an HOA and a town. I expect to have to get a permit from the town to do certain things and have never been denied one. I don't want to be told by someone who has aspired to power all his life what color or siding to put on my house. Our streets are public and should be treated as such. No one should be able to tell you where to park or that your car is too old for the neighborhood.

    Rich
     
  12. Apr 25, 2013 #52 of 114
    SayWhat?

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    I never understood the point of spending 500K for a McMansion on a postage stamp sized lot when you can't hardly even walk between the houses, can cut the lawn with a pair of scissors in 5 minutes and can hear the neighbor throwing a whizz on the driveway, let alone having to put up with Gladys and her band of busy bodies.

    I've got about 7 acres and the nearest neighbor is over a 1/4 mile away. It's partially wooded, so I have a fair supply of firewood without buying it and trees sprout up on their own so I can transplant them wherever I want without Gladys's permission.

    If I want to cut my grass at 7AM before it gets too hot, I go for it. If I want to let parts of it grow as shelter for the wild rabbits, I can.
     
  13. Apr 25, 2013 #53 of 114
    SayWhat?

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    One place next to me is over 50 acres, part field, part woods. Another is 50 acres with one house behind trees that I can only partially see in the winter when the leaves are off. Another is about 40 acres with a house totally hidden by trees. Another direction is a 10-15 acre plot where no one lives full-tiime. It's just used for some livestock. Behind that is close to 100 acres of field.

    There are times when I can stand outside and not hear a single human-related sound (vehicles, machinery, etc.), not even off in the distance or overhead.

    And I don't believe any of the properties I mentioned cost any of us even close to 500K.
     
  14. Apr 25, 2013 #54 of 114
    dpeters11

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    Actually, my parents live in an HOA, I always forget about it. Most residents probably don't even know their house is part of it, it's right on the border, and his "backyard" is 15 acres of woods. The house is only visible from the road in winter. I don't think he even bothers with any of the covenants.
     
  15. Apr 25, 2013 #55 of 114
    RasputinAXP

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    Uh. Come on down south of 195 and see the HOAs we've got in our single family non-condo communities.
     
  16. Apr 25, 2013 #56 of 114
    Cholly

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    Unfortunately, many developers are not forthright about HOA's when you contract to buy/build a home. They don't show you the rules/regs or covenants until it comes to signing the deed. In some states, this is avoided by having an attorney represent you from the time you decide to invest in a home. You get good advice about whether the development of interest has an HOA or not and insight into the covenants.
    Our developer didn't go into details about the HOA in our community other than to mention its functions such as pool and common area upkeep. I ran into problems when I went to install a flagpole in our front yard. Next door neighbor told me about the need to get permission, so I filled out a form with urgent request, wanting to have the flagpole installed before July 4. When I hadn't heard back within what I considered to be a reasonable length of time, I went ahead with the installation. Sometime later, I received a letter demanding I take the flagpole down because I hadn't received athe necessary permission. I checked with the HOA department of the developer and learned a letter had been written denying permission because I installed the pole without waiting for the allowed period of time. The letter was never sent to me, so I basically had implied consent. Not too long after that, the Congress passed a law stipulating that permission may not be required to put up a pole for the purpose of displaying our flag.
    After that episode, I made sure that I got permission for taking down trees, building a fence and erecting a storage shed. No problems as long as the covnants were obeyed.
     
  17. Apr 25, 2013 #57 of 114
    Holydoc

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    I do apologize for my participation in this thread, Rich. I actually thought that you wanted to know the reason "why some communities form HOAs". I did not know it would turn into a debate with you referencing race and Soviets. I hope this thread allowed you to relieve some steam. /sigh
     
  18. Apr 25, 2013 #58 of 114
    Rich

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    Been waiting for you to pop up. I never get down that way and kinda thought HOAs might be more prevalent down there. (He's in South Jersey, I'm in Central Jersey, two very different areas). I was also wondering about Tom's River and places like that. When I was a kid, the southern part of the state just started growing.

    So, they're down there too? You don't live in one, do you?

    Rich
     
  19. Apr 25, 2013 #59 of 114
    Rich

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    No need to apologize, I was curious and have gotten most of my questions answered. The race issue only popped up because my brother-in-law is a bit of a bigot and he lives in an HOA which seems to dislike diversity, which I have no problem with (by this I mean I have no problem with diversity, I dislike bigotry). Most topics such as this thread's do seem to go a bit off course. This one seems to have stayed on course pretty well. I've learned a lot more about HOAs than I did when I started it. Both my brother and brother-in-law seem to have difficulties that most other HOA dwellers don't.

    Now, I'm curious about the forming of HOA's by communities. In our part of Jersey, communities tend to combine into townships to reduce cost. I had no idea a community could form an HOA.

    Rich
     
  20. Apr 25, 2013 #60 of 114
    spartanstew

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    What does that have to do with HOA's???

    I know of plenty of "McMansions" as you call them around here on postage sized lots that don't have an HOA. Our lots are all 1/3 or 1/2, so there's plenty of room between the houses (and in the backyard), and we have an HOA. Oh, and I always cut my grass between 7am - 8am in the summer before it gets too hot.

    Still not sure why all of you that are against HOA's keep assuming that they're all the same and they infringe on all of your rights. Ignorance about the subject is one thing, but to continue to show the same ignorance even after reading to the contrary, mystifies me.

    Again, not sure what this has to do with why some would want an HOA? Clearly it's not even a consideration in situations like yours (as I think I mentioned in my first post in this thread). Are you sure you're replying in the right thread?
     

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