1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Home Owner's Associations (HOA), Why?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Apr 24, 2013.

  1. Apr 25, 2013 #61 of 114
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    8,324
    460
    May 17, 2010
    USA
    It's one thing to be governed by the city and state. It's another to be dictated to by a HOA.
     
  2. Apr 25, 2013 #62 of 114
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,561
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    I think we all think that, and an agreed upon HOA has never taken away any of my "freedoms".

    Most of the rules are the same, sometimes the town is even harsher.

    And I've never been denied one by an HOA. I think I mentioned before that backyard structures couldn't be more than 10', well the swing set/slide system that I wanted to put in the backyard for the kids a few years ago was 13' high. Called the HOA, no problem.

    First, you're assuming everyone involved with an HOA has power aspirations, and I've found that that can't be further from the truth. Second, nobody is "telling" you what you can and can't do. You agree to certain parameters ahead of time.

    Again Rich, even after all these posts, I don't think you understand. I've never seen an HOA that dictated the age or condition of vehicles. Just doesn't happen. As far as where to park, many cities have these regulations too, and I'm sorry you feel that way, but yes, I don't want my neighbors parking their cars across their lawn or blocking the sidewalks. It's actually a sshame that there needs to be rules about it, because it should be common sense. That's the real reason HOA's starting forming - too many people don't use common sense, so rules were created for those individuals.
     
  3. Apr 25, 2013 #63 of 114
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    26,122
    465
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Doesn't seem as bad as I thought. As long as I know the rules and agree to play by them beforehand, it's kinda like a baseball game. I would definitely have to know the rules first. I've been thinking of buying a second house in PA and most of them seem to have HOAs. As I said in another post, the only impressions I've ever had on HOAs were formed by family members. Both bought boats without having any idea they wouldn't be allowed to keep them on their properties and my brother really must have pushed the envelope with that huge RV he bought. My brother-in-law's HOA president is a pompous ass and I guess I got the wrong impression about that office too.

    Rich
     
  4. Apr 25, 2013 #64 of 114
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,251
    490
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    I have heard of HOA's not allowing new non commercial pickups in the driveway, but allowing Cadillac Escalades etc. because they are fancier and don't have the same look.
     
  5. Apr 25, 2013 #65 of 114
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    26,122
    465
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
    Huh. Some form of discrimination? I guess that's in the rules too?

    Rich
     
  6. Apr 25, 2013 #66 of 114
    sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

    14,583
    369
    Sep 5, 2006
    Allen, TX
  7. Apr 25, 2013 #67 of 114
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,579
    376
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    Do you realize what you just did there? You have now accused the thread starter of not understanding his own thread. Bad enough you accused me of the same... but now the thread starter? I'm pretty sure it isn't me that didn't understand what this thread was about :)
    Mine didn't. They had specific rules about no vehicles with any kind of signage... so if you worked a job that had such a vehicle, you weren't supposed to bring it home. Oh... and would you believe they even included police cruisers in that? I'm serious... they actually sent out a monthly newsletter reminding us of "common violations" and specifically mentioned not wanting to see police cruisers parked outside!
     
  8. Apr 25, 2013 #68 of 114
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,561
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    That's right. He started a thread asking about HOA's, and after lots of responses about how they're not all evil, some are good, they're all different, etc., he still posted as if none of that were true. So, he still wasn't understanding the posts in the thread. It's not that difficult Stewart. You weren't reading the responses (or comprehending them) and either was he, doesn't matter who started the thread and who didn't.

    Then yours was crappy. I ate a bad apple once, but I don't assume all apples are rotten. My current HOA has no such restriction. My neighbor two doors down has a landscaping business and his truck is parked in the street all the time. Several others have logo'd vehicles as well. You can keep bringing up isolated examples of bad rules (and I can bring up examples of bad neighbors that make HOA's necessary for many), but that doesn't change the fact that the majority of HOA's are pretty good and that any potential homeowner just needs to read before signing.
     
  9. Apr 25, 2013 #69 of 114
    tsmacro

    tsmacro Hall Of Fame

    2,369
    56
    Apr 28, 2005
    East...
    For years my sister and her husband didn't get satellite tv because they lived in a neighborhood with a notorious HOA. It's not that there was an actual rule against satellite dishes but they had to be installed only in certain places in certain ways and they just didn't want to deal with the headache. I explained that federal law wouldn't allow their HOA to really do all that much other than bluster about it, but they weren't interested in "fighting for their rights" over satellite tv, wasn't worth the trouble in their opinion. My sister would tell me the story of the woman from the HOA board who would go out for evening walk with a ruler in her hand and would measure people's lawns and as a result they had gotten several notices over the years of their lawn being an "inch too tall" and to mow it asap "or else". I also seem to remember one time they got a warning over their mailbox not being properly maintained or something along those lines. In any case when they moved sure enough one of the first things they got was satellite tv!
     
  10. Apr 25, 2013 #70 of 114
    scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

    6,273
    30
    Apr 22, 2002
    Youngsville NC
    Oh really ? - If that happened to me - I'd sue them into bankruptcy - with a smile... regardless of that clause...
     
  11. Apr 25, 2013 #71 of 114
    trh

    trh This Space for Sale

    5,471
    242
    Nov 2, 2007
    NE FL
    If I have to live in a close-urban environment where my neighbor's house impacts the value of my house, I'm looking for an HOA. Give me 40+ acres in the country and an HOA would be the last thing I want.

    They are not all good. I've had to file two Petitions with the FCC over satellite dishes against my HOA (and almost a third but the FCC was able to convince them via a phone call of the errors of their pending rules).

    And we had a police officer with a K9 and he had a kennel in his back yard. Since outside kennels aren't allowed, they made him remove it. He moved shortly there after. Stupid!

    But I don't want the house with the reflective highway painted soffits or multiple cars in disrepair in the yards either.
     
  12. Apr 25, 2013 #72 of 114
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    26,122
    465
    Feb 22, 2007
    Piscataway, NJ
  13. Apr 25, 2013 #73 of 114
    trh

    trh This Space for Sale

    5,471
    242
    Nov 2, 2007
    NE FL
    You mean a co-op? I think they are completely different.
     
  14. Apr 25, 2013 #74 of 114
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,579
    376
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    That's the other insidious way that many HOAs enforce their rules... even if they would lose in court, many people will not take the time or money to fight them in court... so people either comply or relocate to avoid conflicts.

    Some things you shouldn't even have to fight over... but many HOAs that I've either had personal experience with or been aware of from others that I know will push the boundaries until someone fights back... and if you don't fight, you lose be default... but if you fight it still costs you time and money and then you've made an enemy so they watch you even closer for the things that they can enforce.
     
  15. Apr 25, 2013 #75 of 114
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    I live in a neighborhood which has no amenities to speak of (No pool, clubhouse, park, or even a bench). What we do have is 8 x 100 foot area which borders the street which has a few tree's, a few flowers and a small strip of grass and a very nice brick wall with our developments name.

    We have a VOLUNTARY HOA which has a fee of $100.00 per year. What I mean by voluntary is that while our neighborhood has an HOA, we have no covenants and as such membership is more symbolic than anything. The HOA has no legal authority to speak of and really is nothing more than a group put in charge to pay the the landscaping service.
     
  16. Apr 25, 2013 #76 of 114
    swyman18

    swyman18 Legend

    307
    13
    Jan 12, 2009
    I guess it really just depends on what is important to people. Personally, I would feel bad about complaining because my neighbors lawn was an inch or so too high, then finding out maybe his child is gravely ill, or his wife just died or whatever.

    Better make sure your garage door is not open for too long, that will cause the look of the neighborhood to be ruined and people will be up in arms.
     
  17. Apr 25, 2013 #77 of 114
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

    6,456
    88
    Mar 18, 2006
    Teays...
    I live in a subdivision that is not inside any municipality. The roads are also provately owned, ie not owned by the state. Without an HOA I would never get out of my neighborhood in the winter. The HOA collects dues and contracts for snow removal. It also takes care of lawn maintenance in the common areas and road repairs.

    My parents also live in a similar neighborhood that was created long before the move to HOA's. Since there is no "legal" HOA there, a group does its best to collect money for road repairs and salt for the hill etc. Some people contribute, some don't. Their neighborhood has a mix of young couples with their first homes and older people well into retirement. So you have one group that wants to see home values rise and are willing to contribute vs another group who could care less what their paid off house is worth as long as they get to live there. So the whole neighborhood is heading down.

    This is why at this point of my life in the home I am in want an HOA. I live in a nice neighborhood and want to at least be able to sell my house for what I paid for it. When I retire, I want to move to a hundred+ acres and not have anyone around me. So HOA or no HOA will matter then.
     
  18. Apr 25, 2013 #78 of 114
    swyman18

    swyman18 Legend

    307
    13
    Jan 12, 2009
    I think it's this line of thinking that rubs people the wrong way a bit. As I said, different things are important to different people.

    Suppose you were forced to move for whatever reason to a neighborhood with no HOA. All your neighbors were the nicest people in the world, but one of them happened to park a car on the lawn due to lack of space or whatever. Would "these individuals" be considered the scum of the earth in your eyes?
     
  19. Apr 25, 2013 #79 of 114
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,561
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    No, I never said anyone was considered the scum of the earth. But, there's a reason there's driveways and streets. If he was parking on his lawn and it was against the HOA's rules, I would certainly hope the HOA would do something about it. But let me be clear, breaking the rules of an HOA does not make someone beneath someone else or scum of the earth.

    I'm not sure why expecting people to follow the rules they agreed to (in any aspect of life) rubs people the wrong way. If I start lacing all of my posts with profanity will that be OK? No, I agreed to the rules of this board (go ahead Stewart, mention that this board is not a necessity: well neither is homeownership in an HOA), just like I agreed to the rules of my HOA. If I didn't agree with them, I wouldn't have bought a house here (nor should anyone else). It's a very simple thing.
     
  20. Apr 25, 2013 #80 of 114
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,561
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    Nobody in any HOA I've ever lived in, "turns people in". That's what happens on TV shows. The HOA has officers, or the like, that occasionally drive the neighborhood and then send out letters.

    I get a letter every Spring about my lawn. Once I get the HOA letter about weeds in my yard, I know it's time to start mowing and doing landscaping. But none of my neighbors are turning me in.
     

Share This Page