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Hosting a neighbor's dish ?

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by obrienaj, Mar 15, 2006.

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  1. FTA Michael

    FTA Michael Hall Of Fame

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    Jul 21, 2002
    Yup, I wouldn't want my neighbor up on my roof. That's why I'd insist on a freestanding, ground-level pole.

    And if you insist on seeing it in self-interest terms, remember that happy neighbors who owe you a favor are often better to live next to than grumpy neighbors you turned down.
     
  2. obrienaj

    obrienaj Godfather

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    Apr 7, 2004
    Your skepticism was correct. I decided to try the chop a few limbs off the tree option first, and asked that the installer come again and meet with me to make sure which parts of the tree were blocking the signal.

    When he came, a different employee, referenced branches on the left side of the tree whereas the original installer said right-hand side of my tree. Since it was the left side of the tree, and they had installed the dishes on the furthest right part of the neighbor's roof, I suggested they had installed the Dish at a poor location. The installer had determined that it was the 110 bird that had a line-of-sight problem and agreed with me that 110 was visible on the left side of the roof. For some reason, he decided a 'split-dish" install was called for. It took an hour to get permission from Dish since it required an extra Dish, LNB, and an "expensive switch". However they did do it and my neighbor has 97 signal strength on each satellite. Two dishes on the right of the house and one on the left , looks odd but my neighbor is happy and so is my tree!
     
  3. alebowgm

    alebowgm Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 12, 2004
    So basically he went and took the Dish500 installed, used it for 119 and then installed another Dish500 and used it for 110, then either used a DP34 or DPP 44 switch to connect with whatever wing you are pointed at...
     
  4. the_bear

    the_bear Godfather

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    Oct 18, 2004
    I would also suggest charging rent to establish a contract. Depending on your relationship with your neighbor $1 a year would be fine.
     
  5. Fifty Caliber

    Fifty Caliber Banned User

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    Jan 4, 2006
    Or a six pack of beer. :lol:
     
  6. k1xv

    k1xv New Member

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    Jan 30, 2004
    Yes. You would be creating an easement for the neighbor to use your property for a Dish antenna, and with that all that comes along.....right of entry to installers.

    Who pays the property insurance? Who is liable if an installer is injured?

    This would make a nice bar exam question.
     
  7. obrienaj

    obrienaj Godfather

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    Apr 7, 2004

    Yep, I don't know the switch model number but my neighbor now has a Dish Network "box" on the side of his house. I estimate it is about a 4" X 4" box with many connectors for RG6 cable on three sides of the box.
     
  8. jmsteffen

    jmsteffen Mentor

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    May 4, 2005
    This thread speaks volumes of how far we have come as Americans... This all seems a bit petty to me.
     
  9. Fifty Caliber

    Fifty Caliber Banned User

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    I don't disagree with you there.
     
  10. obrienaj

    obrienaj Godfather

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    Apr 7, 2004

    I said the same thing to a few friends. Being "neighborly" can get to all kinds of legal issues.
     
  11. CABill

    CABill Hall Of Fame

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    Obrienaj worked it out quite well, but I would avoid charging rent or establishing a contract. My suggestion for permission was because permission can be revoked for any reason, at any time. If the neighbor wanted to do something to your roof that you didn't want done, you revoke permission for him to even get sat service from your property. Establishing a contract would actually bind Obrienaj to do something. That benefits the neighbor, not Obrienaj.
     
  12. FTA Michael

    FTA Michael Hall Of Fame

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    Jul 21, 2002
    No, it's not automatic that a lease or other kind of contract would have been one-sided. A contract is merely a representation of what the two sides agree on, including some language about how to handle unexpected events. The host could have easily established that he could revoke the lease with reasonable notice, but that wouldn't have been very friendly. Instead, the contract could have specified that the neighbor would have certain liability issues, that the host would have some protection, and that ownership changes or (fill in the blank) would end the agreement.
     
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