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How television advertising deals with DVRs destroying their business

Discussion in 'TV Show Talk' started by Mark Holtz, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. Mark Holtz

    Mark Holtz Day Sleeper DBSTalk Club

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    From SF Gate:

    How television advertising deals with DVRs destroying their business
    FULL ARTICLE HERE
     
  2. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    I've always hated commercials like that. The product or brand name should be identified from the very first frame.
     
  3. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Winters,...
    The shoulds are determined by Ad Agencies and their clients. Ads are generally considered successful if you remember the product in a favorable light. You may hate an ad that'd be judged a good one for you (determined by the client).
     
  4. Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    NY Hudson...
    I don't skip ads. I able to ignore most of 'ém. As I surf the Internet while they're on.
     
  5. Mark Holtz

    Mark Holtz Day Sleeper DBSTalk Club

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    The last time a television ad directly influenced my decision to buy, I was in Canada, and saw an ad for Boston Pizza's Pizzaburger. Most of the time, it has been primarily word of mouth which is surprisingly an effective and cheap (but potentially expensive) way to advertise.
     
  6. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    I can't say as I've ever bought any product or service based on a TV ad. In fact, just the opposite -- there are companies I will NOT buy from because of their overspending on TV ads. Geico is one, but there are many others.

    When watching 'live' programming, I'll hit the Guide button and let that stay on the screen during Spam breaks, then spin back a few seconds if I have to.
     
  7. seern

    seern DIRECTV A-Team

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    I record most of what I am going to watch just so I can skip the ads. They are a waste of my time and I can get through most shows in 45 to 50 minutes.
     
  8. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL DIRECTV A-Team

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    What's a commercial? :D
     
  9. Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Just think, in the future, individual household will get ads aim at their shopping habits!
     
  10. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL DIRECTV A-Team

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    Didn't you watch Futurama? In the future ads are directed at individuals and broadcast in your dreams.
     
  11. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Winters,...
    That's already happening!
     
  12. gov

    gov Legend

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    If there were 5 to 8 minutes of ads per hour I might not bother to fast forward through them.

    I really hate when it's several minutes from the top of the hour, and we get 3 or 4 minutes of commercials, the show comes back for 2 minutes and then at the top of the hour another 5 minutes of commercials.

    Screw that !

    :eek2:
     
  13. djlong

    djlong Hall Of Fame

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    New Hampshire
    That's the way it used to be. 9 minutes per hour. The best example of that is looking at episodes of Star Trek - the original series from the 1960s - on Netflix. They clock in at 51 minutes and change.
     
  14. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    Although I have not watched very many commercials in their entirety (other than Victorias Secret) since winning a Betamax in a contest in 1978 (and I have mixed feelings about that since commercial air time sales indirectly pays my salary), studies show that most people, even those with DVRs, do not skip commercials. They may walk the dog, pinch a loaf of their own, or make a Dagwood sandwich, but most folks let the commercials blare on in the background. Studies also show commercial ads are effective, but of course those studies are self-serving so may not be accurate at all. Personally, I don't see how the GEICO commercials are effective in any way, for instance.

    What Druce is positing here might not be going to happen, but here is what is happening and what will happen:

    First, most large market stations connect to cable outlets via direct fiber, and many of those send different commercials to cable viewers than they do to OTA viewers. That's been the reality for some time.

    But here is what I predict. Broadcasters have many categories of commercials, but most fall into one of three. There are spots picked individually for particular avails, spots picked to run within a particular hour and/or particular day or daypart, and "ROS" which means Run On Schedule and refers to the cheap spots that can be plugged in anywhere.

    One of the problems with DVRs is it delays the commercials as well as the program; if Sony Pictures wants to advertise on Thursday (which is why Thursday has the best programs) it doesn't do them much good if you only play back their commercial when you watch the show after that particular movie has already left the theatre. So +3 and +7 DVR rates are not desirable and don't mean much.

    But the technology is there for DTV, for instance, to work with a broadcaster to have a group of generic ROS commercials that they can push to your DVR in the wee hours, and if a show is played back after 7 days, those commercials can be inserted on the fly locally per viewer, covering those commercials that folks don't want to pay for. They could even report back how many watched or FFWD-ed through the commercial, which is much more accurate than the current model which just assumes a particular number of eyeballs.

    I don't think that is happening yet, but check back in a year or two. This might even breathe new life into the old business model.
     
  15. lwilli201

    lwilli201 Hall Of Fame

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    I buy store brand products when possible. In many cases they are as good as highly advertised brands. The cost difference is obviously advertising cost. If you see a product advertised on network TV prime time then you know it is overpriced.
     
  16. Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Not when it comes to toilet paper.
     
  17. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    the stores brands always imitate a major brand. so is THAT brand that is making a poor product


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  18. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL DIRECTV A-Team

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    Most store brands are made by the same people who make the highly advertised brands and are the same product.
     
  19. Drucifer

    Drucifer New Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Being made at the same manufacturer plant and being made the same are not the same thing.
     
  20. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Glad you said this.

    As someone who was raised, and who worked, in agricultural regions - not only where stuff is grown but where it is processed for canning and freezing - I know what comes in the front door varies substantially and quality control decisions are made all the time relative to labeling. There's always decision-making relative to what goes into the key brands - Del Monte, Green Giant, Minute Maid - and what goes into store brands. In fact, at times it's the same thing and at times it is not. And many name brands have their own "recipe" for processing which they don't share with the store brands.

    And then there's the whole "selective breeding" process that has occurred in my lifetime that has resulted in tomatoes that can be run over by a tractor and not damaged. Also I really was startled the first time I saw a truck dumping green tomatoes on a conveyor belt, tomatoes that came out red at the other end of the building. Better living with chemistry....

    But I still enjoy a good Big Mac even though I have to drink two bottles of water in the next hour. :sure:

    I know, I'm part of the problem, not the solution.
     

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