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HR2x with Built-in WiFi Capability?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Steve, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. gregjones

    gregjones Hall Of Fame

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    Though I hate to set precedent, I agree with you.
     
  2. willag

    willag New Member

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    I wasnt comparing to the functionality of the HR-XX, I am just pointing out that its cheap and has built in wireless. It does get software updates automatically.
     
  3. rahlquist

    rahlquist Hall Of Fame

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    The wii also has wireless and has also been hacked to allow bootable linux. That said, straight out of box other then how hard it is to enter the encryption keys(aim at the keyboard on screen with the wii remote), its very easy to set up. And it updates its own firmware over the wireless or wired(with a purchased adapter).
     
  4. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    That really would be quite cool.

    I have a friend who has an HR20 and is getting a HR21. They will be in different parts of the house and will need to run wire to get them networked.

    IMHO, wireless will be the next step. It's just a guess but it makes sense.

    Mike
     
  5. d0ug

    d0ug Legend

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    Why does the Wi-Fi need to be built in? You're going to need an external antenna for the Wi-Fi anyways to get good signal. These boxes have USB and USB Wi-Fi adapters are the size of thumb drives now. DirecTV could just include USB drivers in the firmware for some of the more popular USB Wi-Fi chipsets and post a compatibility chart for the supported devices. Or just come out with a single DirecTV branded USB Wi-Fi adapter and only support that chipset in that configuration. This also eliminates the problem of changing Wi-Fi standards, just plug in an upgraded USB adapter.
     
  6. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    I assumed the antenna would be inside the case, like the Wii (or laptops with built-in radios).

    I didn't realize "N" capable USB radios the size of thumb drives were available, but after a little googling, I see there are a few of them out there. I guess one of those would work as well, assuming they perform OK. /steve
     
  7. rahlquist

    rahlquist Hall Of Fame

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    I feel like we are going in circles. :lol:

    The main reason to include it in the unit
    • Dirver Lockdown (only one driver needed instead of many USB devices)
    • Simplified support: if the network setup is handeld totally in the box then you dont get support calls saying "Of corse my wifi adapter is configured right, your DVR is just not working!"
    • D* controls the environment and the bugs, look at how well it works for most prorietary hardware.
    • Increased Percieved Value

    Reasons not to include it
    • Increased unit cost
    • Adds another platform to support
    • Customers will expect it to work flawlessly
    • Locked in to purchasing yet another chip for live of unit or line.
    • Tougher to pass FCC/Enginerring testing due to increased 'noise'
    • One more point of failure causing whole DVR replacement
    • Potential security issue allowing wardrivers to try to hack the DVR's
     
  8. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salem, OR
     
  9. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    You touch on the FCC issue, but it's bigger than just passing their tests. If you include WiFi you now have to deal with properly shielding the radio from the other components in the box that could be affected. Hardly insurmountable, but still a consideration.
     
  10. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    :lol: OK... so maybe not "in" the case (unless the case material is different), but somehow mounted externally across the back. e.g. /steve
     
  11. Rob-NovA

    Rob-NovA Icon

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    Again, you have a very good point. But the simplest solution is not always the best solution or the most practical. I don't have any hard evidence to back this up other than my own experience and those of my friends, but how many people have a router or switch installed in their living room or den to make an easy wired connection? For example, mine is in the basement, where my cable modem terminates and it's over 300 feet to where my primary DVR is located and not easily fished, as I'd have to drill through a few concrete walls (the other one is wired in the basement as it's 20 feet away). Powerline networking is not really an option as I have an old house with marginal electrical wiring (built in 1940). I can't even do X10 reliably. So wireless is the best option.

    I see that being the case for most folks, but then again, I have a bias in this area and realize that my experiences may not be typical. I'd be curious to see how well the D* branded powerline networking kits are selling. That would be an interesting datapoint.
     
  12. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    Again, I simply would point to the Wii, iPhone, Zune and any other consumer devices that manage to include WiFi in their mass-market product offerings... "hardly insurmountable" as Ken said (even though I know he is not agreeing with me. :)) /steve
     
  13. gregjones

    gregjones Hall Of Fame

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    I agree that wireless is the best option for you. I don't believe that this is a common problem though. For the great majority of residential installs, an ethernet cable or a powerline install is more effective and more resilient. There are very specific problems with powerline but they are of the pass/fail variety. If it works day one, it will continue to work. Wireless has the problem of being impacted by far more variables.
     
  14. morphy

    morphy Legend

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    I wouldn't mind wifi on them, but personally I have wired cat-5 within 3 feet of every receiver in my house. In fact, every room where one could potentially watch television gets 2x RG6 and 2x cat-5.

    Note that wireless N does NOT reliably carry 720p with DD5.1. Don't plan on pushing HD over MRV on it without stutters.
     
  15. gregjones

    gregjones Hall Of Fame

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    And many people with DVRs are far less tech-savvy than the demographics for any of the devices listed. If you doubt this, look at the issues people had hooking up their HR2x for networking over wireless. Many of the issues had more to do with their router setup than the bridge setup.
     
  16. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    No argument from me on that point. I am proposing this capability for folks who may already have wireless running in their homes for other devices. I assume if they managed to get those devices up and running, they should be able to configure an HR, if it has a wireless UI similar to a Wii. /steve
     
  17. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    Steve,

    I don't feel that strongly against having wireless capabilities in the box. I do think that down the road it is not going to be a great solution for the people trying to use MRV/DoD, etc...especially if it is limited to 802.11b or g.

    There are always tradeoffs in the manufacture of these boxes. While the Wii includes wireless access which they deem important for a variety of reasons...Nintendo did not include the ability to play a DVD. Microsoft didn't include wireless in the XBox 360, but did include DVD playback (albeit possibly the worst DVD player of all time) :)
     
  18. evan_s

    evan_s Hall Of Fame

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    The biggest difference I see there is the Wii, the DS, iPhone, Zune none of them are looking to push around HD video in real time. Even the netflix streaming box isn't looking to do HD. The Apple TV which is much closer to what DirecTV is using it's network connection for uses N wireless.
     
  19. gregjones

    gregjones Hall Of Fame

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    And I would suggest that population use a wireless ethernet bridge, which is completely replaceable/upgradable and requires no software development.
     
  20. bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

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    Bainbridge...
    The latest (0x27D) CE firmware has support for configuring the Linksys WGA600N wireless gaming adapter in the Network Setup screens. This should show up in the next NR.
     

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