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I made a mistake

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Kichigai, Feb 21, 2008.

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  1. finaldiet

    finaldiet Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 13, 2006
    Some states have a 3 day return policy. It is not a blanket for 3 days on everything, but a few things. I was just reading a while back on it. I will try to find it later when I get home. I always thought it was on everything, but badly mistaken.:(
     
  2. ktk0117

    ktk0117 Legend

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    Nov 27, 2006
    My state law's are for "Contracts", and have 3 days to rescind.
     
  3. dodge boy

    dodge boy R.I.P. Chris Henry

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    Mar 31, 2006
    well I had reception issues and the installer came out and really did nothing.... I needed an amp installed since I had so many feeds split in... He tied it to my existing D* wirring... 3 feeds in the living room, 2 to my son's room and 1 to my room. I got pixilation on the DVRs aad Digital converters. (2 DVRS and 1 Converter)
     
  4. finaldiet

    finaldiet Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 13, 2006
    Yes, Wisconsin is a blanket state for 3 day contracts.
     
  5. finaldiet

    finaldiet Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 13, 2006
    Okay, here's what I have so far. The 3 day cancellation rule applies only to door-door or off-premise contracts. Automobile, health clubs,etc. are not covered. When I get the link I'll add it.
     
  6. bidger

    bidger Hall Of Fame

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    Nov 19, 2005
    That's the ticket! Why outright cancel when you have the option to suspend until you're sure you'll be happy with another provider? Suspension of the account is a much better option.

    Cable has some major strides to make before I'll consider replacing DIRECTV.
     
  7. Smuuth

    Smuuth Well-Known Member

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    Oct 4, 2005
    The Federal Trade Commission has a "Cooling Off Rule" which I believe applies to all sales of goods and services:

    The Cooling-Off Rule, promulgated in 1972, requires a seller of goods or services costing $25 or more, at a place other than the seller's regular place of business, to inform buyers of their right to cancel the sale within three business days and receive a full refund. In addition, the seller must furnish the buyer with a summary of the buyer's cancellation rights, and two copies of an actual cancellation form. In November 1988, the Commission granted exemptions from the rule to sellers of arts and crafts at fairs, and sellers of automobiles at temporary places of business who also have at least one permanent place of business. With the exception of these sales, the rule applies to sales made "at a place other than the place of business of the seller," such as in consumers’ homes...

    However, there are some exceptions:

    Some types of sales cannot be canceled even if
    they do occur in locations normally covered by
    the Rule. The Cooling-Off Rule does not cover
    sales that:

    • are under $25;

    • are for goods or services not primarily
    intended for personal, family or household
    purposes. (The Rule applies to courses of
    instruction or training.);

    • are made entirely by mail or telephone;

    • are the result of prior negotiations at the
    seller’s permanent business location where
    the goods are sold regularly;

    • are needed to meet an emergency. Suppose
    insects suddenly appear in your home, and
    you waive your right to cancel;

    • are made as part of your request for the
    seller to do repairs or maintenance on your
    personal property (purchases made beyond
    the maintenance or repair request are
    covered).


    If you made the entire transaction by phone, you may not be covered. :(
     
  8. finaldiet

    finaldiet Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 13, 2006
    10-4 !!


     
  9. cwdonahue

    cwdonahue Legend

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    Jun 6, 2007
    You appear to have really bought into the bundling concept. I hope it's not just because you want one bill. I have a cable modem, D*, Verizon Wireless cell service, and at&t landline service. I just setup autopayment to keep from writing a bunch of checks. I know I'm paying more for the right to choose, but cable modem is the best data service in my neighborhood, my customer is Verizon Wireless so I don't have much choice there, and I'm keeping at&t until I get my cell phone coverage issues fixed in my house. That will be the first to go.
     
  10. bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    Jan 21, 2003
    Why do you have to give up your cable modem? I've had DirecTV for going on 12 years and have had a cable modem for Internet for nearly 6. Sure I pay a $10 "extortion" fee for not have cable TV channels but it's still cheaper then cable for everything (besides getting better channel selection by far with DirecTV).

    You can indeed have both, no problem.
     
  11. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Aug 5, 2002
    Dripping...
    I'm on TWC and lucky that Earthlink is an alternative to RoadRunned, Earthlink doesn't hit us up with the non-cable TV customer surcharge.
     
  12. trekologer

    trekologer Legend

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    Jun 30, 2007
    Vonage?
     
  13. Directvlover

    Directvlover Legend

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    Aug 27, 2007
    It's my understanding Vonage is just phone. You still have to have high speed internet correct? Even then, my local digital phone is cheaper then vonage. And by having the digital phone and internet through the same company they discount both services, making them cheaper then competitors.
     
  14. boba

    boba Hall Of Fame

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    May 23, 2003
    "Writ of Recession" I believe is what you are looking for and it applies to contracts basically written in your home. If you sign DISH or Directv's contract in your home you have 3 days to cancel in writing, If you buy and agree to the contract in Best Buys store you aren't covered.:)
     
  15. Elephanthead

    Elephanthead Legend

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    Feb 3, 2007
    Just sign up using a name from the obituary, let them ding some poor dead dudes credit rating. but seriously, these commitments are bunk, it is just a way to force you to stay even if your not happy with the service. DTV is not that bad, at least they prorate it. Anyway I got them to credit me the breakup fee before I agreed to service, but now that DISH is sucking on HD, they are less likely to sweeten the deal. They know they got you, just put the money aside and expect to fork it over when you cancel if you can't last 2 years.
     
  16. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    This is probably why you find DIRECTV and DISH Network using the term "commitment" instead of "contract".
     
  17. Hansen

    Hansen Hall Of Fame

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    Jan 1, 2006
    That is not entrely correct...especially for Texas. First, it's important to recognize that each state's consumer protection laws (right to recision portion) differ in their respective scope and application. Second, for Texas, it is true that if the contract is not done at the merchants usual place of business, then the right of recision law applies. However, the right to recision law does not apply to sales conducted entirely by phone or mail. Since the sale of DirectTV services is done entirely by phone...you negotiate and agree to services via phone with Directv, it would not apply. The installer coming to install is not part of that sales transaction; he is merely there to carry out what was agreed to on the phone. You are correct that the right to recision law does not apply when buying DirecTv at Best Buy or similar merchants. Also, note that in Texas the seller must advise you of right to recision and provide you with a form for the recision. The recision must be in writing.
     
  18. rudeney

    rudeney Hall Of Fame

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    May 28, 2007
    The point being missed here is there is no signed contract. There is a verbal agreement to a “service commitment”. Since D* does not have your signature, and they do not provide you with a written statement of the terms, it’s a “he said-she said” situation. If you took it to court, I’ll bet you would win. The problem is, D* would have dinged your credit before it got that far.
     
  19. bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    Jan 21, 2003
    Hmmmm. I had to sign something before the installer left and it clearly stated what my commitment was.
     
  20. LOCODUDE

    LOCODUDE Hall Of Fame

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    Aug 7, 2007
    New York
    So true...........Indeed..........Seems we all tend to forget that.. :)
     
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