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IF grounding is so important why 2 pronged receivers

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by aim2pls, Sep 21, 2007.

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  1. aim2pls

    aim2pls Icon

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    Jun 18, 2007
    IF grounding is so important why 2 pronged receivers ?????

    and multi-switches without ground lugs

    and no dedicated location on the dish for grounding

    and nothing at all for LNBF's grounding

    (this should be interesting to see everyone's opinion) .. and they are welcome
     
  2. d max82

    d max82 Godfather

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    Multiple grounds in a system can cause a "ground loop" if the grounds are at slightly different potentials (voltage). It is important to be grounded, IN ONE LOCATION. your reciever is actually grounded through your RG6 live back to the switch back to the dish to prevent noise.
     
  3. redskin9

    redskin9 AllStar

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    Oct 12, 2005
    But what about the receiver (HR20) power plug ? Why was the H20 grounded thru power and feeds?
     
  4. armophob

    armophob Difficulty Concen........

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    Fort Pierce, FL
    Exclude the HR20-700. It is an un-admitted design flaw and was corrected with the HR20-100 series.
     
  5. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    I've yet to see a DTivo have a grounded plug. Guess they are flawed as well. :rolleyes:
     
  6. JeffBowser

    JeffBowser blah blah blah

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    I've always assumed the ground block that is supposed to be on the cables was meant to be sufficient for the entire system for its true purpose - drain static charges and sink potential shorts from the receiver.
     
  7. grandpaken

    grandpaken AllStar

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    Feb 4, 2006
     
  8. Howie

    Howie Godfather

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    Aug 16, 2006
    I don't even have my dish grounded. I've seen lightning maybe 3 times in the 20 years I've lived around here. We just don't get thunderstorms here like I used to see growing up in Texas. Now that I've said this, I'll probably get everything in my rack fried - it's supposed to rain tonight.:D
     
  9. Redlinetire

    Redlinetire Icon

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    Jul 24, 2007
    A 2-pronged plug IS a 'grounded' plug. It's an AC circuit, one for the source - one for ground.

    The third plug is actually an extra 'safety' ground. Usually used to ground a chassis in which the electronics (circuit boards, motors, etc.) sit in case there's a failure.

    The third plug doesn't help 'ground' anything in a properly designed and running system.
     
  10. pendragn

    pendragn Cool Member

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    Aug 20, 2007
    The third plug also keeps any exposed metal, like the chassis, at the same potential as any other electronics that might be nearby. Without that a person could potentially get shocked by touching two things that are plugged in if there's a ground loop or the hot and neutral got switch (either in the socket or the power cord) or if they touch something else that is grounded like a water faucet.

    tk
     
  11. Swheat

    Swheat Legend

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    Aug 10, 2005
    The white wire in a 120 VAC is not a ground wire . It is a current carrying conductor. The ground wire wire is not meant to be a current carrying conductor. It is their only to provide a path of of least resistance to ground in the event of a short.

    It allows high amounts of current to flow in order to immediately cause your other protections, such as fuses and or circuit breakers to trip immediately due to the high current flow. ( Along with providing an alternative path not through your body.)

    A two prong plug is most definitely not a grounded system. For further info, read the NEC.
     
  12. Redlinetire

    Redlinetire Icon

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    Jul 24, 2007
    Uh, if there is no ground, the electronics don't run. Period.

    Of course a two prong plug is a grounded system. That's how electricity works....

    As I mentioned and pendragn described better, the third plug is a safety chassis ground.
     
  13. aim2pls

    aim2pls Icon

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    Jun 18, 2007
    don't stop on me now .... everyone has avoided all the other non-grounded aspects of the satellite system ...... remember that per the provider ... the system MUST be grounded .. yet their design is flawed
     
  14. Reggie3

    Reggie3 DBSTalk Club Member

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    Yep - the white wire is called neutral. And it is grounded by the utilities as it enters your house. But it may not be at the same potential as the "ground" wire

    The "ground" wire is there for safety like you said.
     
  15. Reggie3

    Reggie3 DBSTalk Club Member

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    Should have a poll on whose dishes are grounded.

    Not mine.

    I suspect even with grounding the electronics will be destroyed anyway. Thank Allah for homeowners insurance
     
  16. Swheat

    Swheat Legend

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    Aug 10, 2005
    I think that you are thinking of the sheild or drain wire used on a lot of sensitive electronic equipment. In a 120 V system there is a hot wire and a neutral wire. The neutral wire does normally go back to the same place as the ground wire, but it is not a ground. Again, read the NEC.

    The NEc is the National Electric Code. I know it may seem like I'm quibling about nothing since the ground wire and the the neutral are both tied to the the same place. But their purpose and functions are totally different. One is used to complete a path for current flow (the neutral). One is used to provide a low resitance path to ground (for safety), in the event of a short).

    Withjout the third prong, it is not considered grounded equipment. Unless, as D* requires, thered is a seperate ground installed, i.e. at the dish.
     
  17. stephenC

    stephenC Legend

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    Jul 18, 2007
    Earth
    The lightning and thunder woke me up last night. No direct hits anywhere near me.
     
  18. Redlinetire

    Redlinetire Icon

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    I agree, we're arguing semantics here. I have an science/engineering background, so the "return path" or "neutral" or whatever the NEC decided to call it for residential use is what I would call 'ground' or 'earth' as used in other fields. (Try working on a MG sports car with 'positive ground' and you'll learn quickly!)

    As you point out, the third 'safety ground' is just that - an extra layer of safety. But it doesn't provide a 'return path' (grounding in my world) for the operation of the equipment. It's a shame that the NEC says equipment isn't 'grounded' unless it has a third plug. That just adds confusion to an already complicated subject for many people.
     
  19. techrep

    techrep Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 15, 2007
    Finally, something I know a little about. :D Cars use the frame as a conductor for the return path (as regards the battery or alternator) and the term grounded, as used here, is proper for describing the return path (attach wire to frame or other metal connected to frame). All "static" structures require a "independent from structure" return path. In these cases the ground will provide a return path but is against code to do so. As someone else stated earlier, The grounds primary purpose is to prevent one from coming into contact with a potential difference if they touch metal that happens to come into contact with a live wire seeking that difference:)

    IBEW LCL760 inactive
     
  20. unclduey

    unclduey Cool Member

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    Feb 22, 2006
    The "neutral" is called a grounded conductor and the "hot" is called an ungrounded conductor per NEC. When the grounded conductor is used to "ground" a chassis, eg. dryer,range,oven, it is called "bonded".

    You are correct stating the unit is not grounded but it is bonded to the neutral which is grounded. I know what you mean re:MG, I just sold an AH Sprite, now that'll mess you up!
     
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