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If You Don't Like a Program, Why Do You Keep Watching? And Complaining?

Discussion in 'TV Show Talk' started by olguy, Nov 2, 2009.

  1. Nov 2, 2009 #1 of 32
    olguy

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    It may take me a few (2 or 3) episodes to stop watching one I don't like. But there seem to be some folks here I would liken to a person who keeps hitting their thumb with a hammer in hopes that it will stop hurting and all the while groaning 'dang, that hurts. Hope it stops hurting soon.' and WHAM! smacking the thumb again. I'm just sayin'...!Devil_lol

    How many of you have watched a number of episodes, complaining about each one and then suddenly have the program start meeting your expectations and desires?
     
  2. Nov 2, 2009 #2 of 32
    leww37334

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    Then again, if you don't watch the program what basis do you have to complain?

    So if you watch the program you can't complain and if you don't watch the program you can't complain.........
     
  3. Nov 2, 2009 #3 of 32
    Fontano

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    Actually... several shows in fact.

    I have watched many series that the first few episodes were terrible, then slowly as characters developed, they weed out certain characters, and adjust to the feedback... the show evolves.

    Off the top of my head I can probably name about a dozen series that we watched from pilot, that adjusted during the first season to be some of our favorite series.

    I typically don't judge a show by it's pilot. I have seen many series that I really enjoyed from pilot days get absolutely assulted by critics and writers, and then be gone after just 4 or 5 shows.

    And it todays quick trigger network structure, if the show isn't an overnight raitings hit it is already on the chopping block.
     
  4. Nov 2, 2009 #4 of 32
    Lee L

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    Well, I will often lodge minor complaints about plot holes and such but still enjoy the show, so still watch it. I am not the type of poster you are talking about.

    There have also been some shows like Grey's Anatomy, that I enjoyed quite a bit the first couple of seasons, then did not like the direction they went, so I complained some, hoping the show would eventually get back to what originally drew me to it. I never watched Heroses, but from what I have seen, quite a few people thought similarly about that show.
     
  5. Nov 2, 2009 #5 of 32
    spunkyvision

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    ME! i keep hoping they return to season 1 form but I don't have much hope for it. I still watch it but it I end up watching it on the weekend instead of monday night.
     
  6. Nov 2, 2009 #6 of 32
    SayWhat?

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    There's a term called "Jumped the Shark" that refers to the point where something changes definitively.

    "Becker" did it when Terry Farrell left for example. The first few seasons are great. But after that Farrell left (don't know why) and they brought in Nancy Travis. The whole show changed as they tried to soften Becker's rough edges. I watch the first seasons, but I can't stand the later ones. So I watch the show, but I bitch about how it changed.

    One of the classic examples of network interference causing a show to jump the shark and make viewers watch but bitch was "The John Larroquette Show". The first season was fantastic, real cutting edge stuff. Way ahead of it's time. But the suits at NBC had a fit over a reformed alcoholic and a hooker as lead characters and a brash Latina and a drunken bum as a major supporting characters. They began to tinker with it demanding changes and by the third season the show stunk. NBC took a bunch of heat for it and so far it hasn't been released to DVD, some say due to NBC's embarrassment over what they did to the show.


    You can love and hate the same show.
     
  7. Nov 2, 2009 #7 of 32
    sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I thought Seinfeld was dumb at first...Then I just "got it," and now I think it's the best show ever.
     
  8. Nov 2, 2009 #8 of 32
    Stewart Vernon

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    I don't complain about shows I don't watch UNLESS I have some reason to be against it conceptually... like if it were a show glorifying something I was morally against perhaps.

    For shows that I do watch... usually my complaints are along the lines of if I notice it starting to go south in quality... so I've participated in Heroes discussions on AVSForum expressing disappointment over the show that could have been much better than it is.
     
  9. Nov 2, 2009 #9 of 32
    SayWhat?

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    I try to ignore shows I don't watch and avoid all reference to them unless the hype gets to me. I hate hype. That's where I am with the CSIs and the L&Os. I watched the original L&O and loved it. When the hype got out of control and they started multiplying like rampant bacteria, I quit watching altogether. I could never stand the CSIs from the beginning. The Miami version seems like a bad ripoff of Miami Vice.
     
  10. phrelin

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    Northern...
    I suffer through many new shows knowing that some of the best shows to ever appear on TV didn't really find their groove until season 2.

    "M*A*S*H" was #46 in its first year and fell well below that for a few episodes that year. It's series finale still stands as the most watched episode of a TV show.

    I'm looking for that new "M*A*S*H" and it's fun to complain while watching and waiting.
     
  11. rudeney

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    Got what? It was a show about nothing! :lol:
     
  12. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    ;) Exactly! That's what makes it great!
     
  13. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Yadda, Yadda, Yadda
     
  14. jerry downing

    jerry downing Godfather

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    No soup for you!
     
  15. CCarncross

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    I give many new shows a chance, some I like, some I dont, some grow on you and become favs. I pretty much never come here or anywhere else for that matter and complain about how crappy I think a show is, whats the point? I just stop watching and move on.
     
  16. bicker1

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    I agree. I think some folks either have an unfounded sense of entitlement that all programming they deign to tune in should be custom-tailored to them, and/or are essentially watching some shows solely so that they can post complaints about them on the Internet. ;)
     
  17. bicker1

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    I have found that the majority of the cases where someone claims that a television program has "jumped the shark" are instead cases where the person posting that is simply trying to make their own personal disappointment with the direction that the writers and producers have chosen to take the series sound more important than it really is. They think so little of their own opinion that they won't simply state the reality: that they are disappointed -- their feeling of inadequacy fuels their need to project their personal disappointment into something larger.

    What I have found most interesting is that some of these same people vigorously rail against any objective measures on the quality of a television program, such as ratings. I wouldn't doubt that they'd denigrate peer reviews, such as Academy awards, if those awards contradicted their own personal feelings, and thereby undercut their negative assertions.

    It's pretty insidious.

    As a result of this abuse, I've come to the conclusion that the term "jumped the shark" has effectively, itself, "jumped the shark". People who want to express their own feelings of disappointment about something should grow up and learn to maturely express their personal opinion as such, and feel satisfied that their perspective has received its proper and appropriate airing, without giving into the puerile need to try to make it sound like something more nefarious.
     
  18. jeffshoaf

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    I really like Tina Fey's humor, but I couldn't tolerate 30 Rock when it debuted - it just seemed silly. Watched a couple of episodes, then deleted the series link. But I gave it another try over the summer and now I really enjoy it; I even like the repeats from the 1st season!
     
  19. phrelin

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    Hmmmm. "Nefarious?" It's true people are always overusing and abusing popular phrases even sometimes changing the meaning. "Jumped the shark" started out as an expression of opinion and then became a favorite of critics to point to some objective observation in order to make their opinions seem like an actual truth.

    "Jumped the shark" did have a very specific meaning for the two guys who coined it and made it popular (from Wikipedia):
    Within that very narrow context - "when you know that your favorite..." - the term really means "in my opinion" which allows a very subjective use. It's shortmouth for "In my opinion the show has gone downhill since...."

    On the other hand, Wikipedia at the beginning of the entry says:
    It appears that this definition requires a more objective basis for its use. It appears to require some observable objective actual change in the program's production followed by a measurable consistent decline in ratings over a period of time. So there is foundation for your belief that use of the term may be an attempt to make an opinion appear to be more than an opinion.

    Of course, that "objective" use begs the whole question of ratings as a measurement of a show's quality, as opposed to a measurement of the show's appeal to an audience that has great immediate commercial value for advertisers.

    I don't use the term because almost everything about enjoyment of a TV series is subjective and therefore opinion. If I can support my opinion by pointing to what I think are specific changes in production I'll do so, but it doesn't make it something other than my opinion. Changes in ratings merely mean that others appear to like or not like the changes. That doesn't make my opinion right or wrong.

    With all of that said, I would prefer to give someone using the term the benefit of the doubt because "nefarious" means "extremely wicked or villainous" which to me, in my opinion, seems pretty unlikely most of the time, particularly in these forums. I just think it's lazy writing when a paid critic uses the term. IMHO. :grin:
     
  20. bicker1

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    I prefer to give the benefit of doubt to the good folks whose works the person (ab)using the phrase "jumped the shark" was trying to disparage.
     

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