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Install Questions - Pre-Planning

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by kevin86, Jun 11, 2010.

  1. kevin86

    kevin86 New Member

    9
    0
    Jun 9, 2010
    Hi, was looking for some info. I have my install set up for next Friday the 18th.

    My plan was to keep my existing Comcast Cable internet. Is this going to cause a problem with the install and make it more complicated or get it delayed? Or is this a pretty common thing the installers have to deal with?

    If it's common, just out of curiosity how do they deal with it? Because I'm assuming the pipe the Sat signal in over your existing CoAx.


    Thanks.
     
  2. spanishannouncetable

    spanishannouncetable Icon

    717
    2
    Apr 23, 2002
    You assume incorrectly. They will run fresh RG6 cables as needed. Your satellite system makes demands that a cable TV setup cannot keep up with.
     
  3. Hdhead

    Hdhead Hall Of Fame

    1,241
    2
    Jul 30, 2007
    Directv will not share the same coax cable with Comcast. They will have run a second cable. This is standard install procedure. However if it means fishing new cable through walls it will be additional charge. They generally come in through the outside wall where you need receivers.
     
  4. kevin86

    kevin86 New Member

    9
    0
    Jun 9, 2010
    Thanks for the info....very helpful!!! I guess now I just need to figure out how to get the signal to my other rooms.
     
  5. beckp

    beckp Legend

    118
    0
    Sep 20, 2007
    You might want to consider dumping Comcast. I had Comcast for a long time up until a week ago as well as DirecTV. When my house was built, the builder allowed me to run RG6 where I wanted, so I did (every room in the house except bathrooms). When I got a HD TV in 2002 I went with D* for three TV's and stayed with Comcast for the rest. I liked that with Comcast I didn't need a STB. Now that Comcast rolled out their crappy STB's I figured what the heck, I now need a STB anyhow so I canceled Comcast and went with DirecTV ...saving me $44 a month.

    People complain about D* customer service but holy crap, go visit or call you local Comcast office.
     
  6. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

    10,289
    35
    Jun 24, 2007
    Northern VA
    One thing to consider is that with your Comcast Internet, you only need a coax run to the modem itself. If all of the other runs from where the cable comes into your house at are straight runs to each of your rooms where you have a TV you should still be able to use those cables. The cables would be disconnected from the splitters at the start point and then connected to a DirecTV splitter. You would just need to leave the one cable that is going to the cable modem.

    - Merg
     
  7. kevin86

    kevin86 New Member

    9
    0
    Jun 9, 2010
    Thanks! Is this true? That's exactly what I wanted to hear. I was hoping I could do that.

    My house was built in 2001 so I would assume the Coax is good enough for DirecTV no?
     
  8. john18

    john18 DIRECTV A-Team

    1,035
    11
    Nov 21, 2006
    My house was built in 1997 and I was the first owner, signing the contract while the lot was all dirt. I had some input regarding cable drops, speaker wiring, etc. I also started out with cable TV and internet.

    When I went to D* for programming I stayed on cable internet and D* ran their own cables through whatever walls were needed. After awhile I dumped the cable Internet and went to DSL. At this point my pre-wired coax connections were no longer being used by anything.

    I recently added the D* Whole Home DVR solution, which included a connection to my router so that I could get On Demand and other services via my DSL broadband. When they came to install that they stopped using all the previous through-the-wall wiring and went back to my built-in coax connections, all of which were in exactly the correct spots for my TV's and computer. They upgraded the actual coax connectors at the wall for the different bandwidths and everything works just fine.

    What was old (although not very) is once again new.
     

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