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Installer comin Wed!! Question!!

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by patblue03, Jul 24, 2006.

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  1. patblue03

    patblue03 Cool Member

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    Jul 24, 2006
    Hey guys,
    I have had DirecTV forever, but had to switch to cable for a while and now i'm comin back! I had a question though. I'm getting the 5LNB dish with the new mpeg-4 hd receiver. I have a 50" SXRD Sony, and a top of the line audioquest HDMI cable with a monster HTS-5100 power center. I'm trying to keep the picture quality at its best. Will it make a big difference if I run an upgraded coax cable straight from the dish to the box. (it's only about a 30 ft run).

    What are some other pointers to get the best possible picture :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    Nov 15, 2005
    Won't make a difference.... but it won't hurt either.

    It is a digital signal... either you "get it" or you don't "get it"...
    It could imrove the signal strength so you won't get signal drops... but if you already have an RG-6 cable there... you probably won't see a difference.

    And then there is that HDMI cable you have...
    "Top Of the Line" again it is a digital signal... so you may have "marginal" (I mean VERY marginal) improvement in PQ because of it... but nothing worth spending $$$ over.

    The best way to ensure you get the best picture possible....
    Spend the money to have your TV/AUDIO professionally callibrated.
     
  3. HockeyKat

    HockeyKat Legend

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    Jul 5, 2006
    In my completely uneducated taking a wild guess opinion, I'd say no, it won't make a difference. I have the same tv (LOVE it!!!), and a Denon receiver that all our components run through. All the feeds go from the dish (AT9) to a multiswitch before being connected to the receivers themselves and the picture still looks great.
     
  4. scott T

    scott T The Nth degree

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    Jul 6, 2006
    You have two options for cabling. RG6 or RG6 quad shielded. The only reason you would need quad is if your cable runs are near a lot of florescent lights. If there is any improvement, it will only be in your signal strength. And then the improvement may only be 1-2%.

    As far as picture quality. That’s all up to your receiver and TV. Digital is nothing more that 1 and 0. They’re on or off. You either have them or you don’t.
     
  5. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    Also RG6 with solid copper center conductor. Available in both regular and quad shield. This is recommended for use with the new AT9 dish. Regular RG6 (including quad) has a copper clad steel center conductor.

    Difference in using solid copper is less DC voltage resistance for providing power out to the dish LNB assemblies. Doesn't really make any difference in the amount of signal you get back from the dish.

    Carl
     
  6. patblue03

    patblue03 Cool Member

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    Jul 24, 2006
    The installer is here. One more question. Is it proper to tip the guy if they are going to be putting up the new dish? It seems like it will tak about 2-3 hrs for the total job. Do they expect tips and if so how much?
    Thanks!

    Pat
     
  7. Earl Bonovich

    Earl Bonovich Lifetime Achiever

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    You can Tip if you want...

    I typically offer them a cold cola or something for the ride to their next job.
     
  8. Cap'n Preshoot

    Cap'n Preshoot Godfather

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    Jul 16, 2006
    I agree. Tipping is purely optional and they do not expect it except possibly in the very upscale neighborhoods. If it's DirectTech, based on Houston figures the guy is paid by the job, not by the hour and makes approx $45 per AT9 installed with a schedule goal of 4 systems per day. His uniform and "official" DirecTV truck are furnished to him and he has commuting use of it (meaning he gets to take it home at night). For concealed wiring (fished walls) the tech makes $50 per drop. The techs work from home and get their jobs via the Internet. They have to provide their own hand tools; ladders, safety equipment and specialized test equipment (the Sat alignment meter) and all consumables (cable, connectors, etc) are furnished. They work an average 10 hrs a day and 6 days a week. The 7th day is mandatory time off. I didn't ask about benefits, but the guy told me he gets a flat $30 monthly discount on his own Sat service. Like the rest of us he has to pay for everything else. For service calls (repairs) he makes a flat $15 per job.

    So no, they're not getting rich, but they're off the welfare rolls and gainfully employed. I suppose the guy would appreciate being slipped an extra 10 or 20 bux.
     
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