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Installing two hr10-250's and the Hr20 Through AT9?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by rlgold88, Sep 4, 2006.

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  1. rlgold88

    rlgold88 Godfather

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    Aug 30, 2006
    To take advantage of all the D* tuners along with ota Tuners.
    What would be the best way to connect them?
    I undestand that I will need the Zinwell wb6*8 for the D* tuners

    But what about the ota antenna does that connect to the Zinwell or should it go through splitters to the receivers?

    I plan on getting the ota installed with the AT9 dish. (Is the OTA on the same base as the AT9 dish)?

    Will I have to have 3 cables for each receiver or is there a splitter Diplexor to seperate OTA and D* signals? I only have 2 cables to each of the receivers And am using rabbit ears For OTA.

    But The Rabbit ears are less then desirable connected to the HR 10-250's. I figure I should get better results with the antenna on the roof installed with the AT9 connected to all the receivers HR20 too when I get it.

    Any Info will be appreciated!!!! Thanks

    Equipment:
    two HR10-250
    one HR 20 getting on the Sept 6
    Connected to At9 and OTA Installing sept. 28

    I will connect the above to 3 LNB phase 3 dish untill sept. 28 (Knowing I wont get mpeg4)
     
  2. gio12

    gio12 Icon

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    Jul 31, 2006
    The AT9 dish is not compatiable with Dixplers and any switch. Something about the OTA signal on the same Frequency as the MPEG-4 Signal.
     
  3. captain_video

    captain_video Icon

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    Nov 21, 2005
    You will need to run separate lines for the antenna feeds. A rooftop antenna will definitely get you better signal strength than you rabbit ears. The one cvaveat is the most OTA HD channels are broadcast in UHF and the better UHF antennas are highly directional. If all of your lcoal channels are broadcast from the same location then you're in good shape.

    However, if the broadcast towers are spread apart you may have to install separate antennas for each set of towers and then combine them with a standard UHF/VHF splitter/combiner. You could use an omnidirectional antenna but they tend to be of inferior quality with regards to signal gain and sensitivity and such. An antenna rotator is another option but there's no way program the HR20 to reposition the antenna if you want to record something on a different channel.
     
  4. rlgold88

    rlgold88 Godfather

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    Aug 30, 2006

    So in other words the Ota antenna D* offers probly wont get all the hd local channels. I know that the location of the towers are less then 20 miles all in the detroit area all are uhf. And are yellow coded. what kind of antenna will help the hr10 250's and hr 20 (when available) should I look at.

    I will be putting the ota antenna myself way up on the roof (colonial) as I have a old sat. dish base up their. Tried a terk antenna up their a while back but it was no better the the rabbit ears.

    Also whats a good splitter and or antenna amplifier for ota? So I can connect all 3 receivers to the ota antenna.

    Any suggestions appreciated!!!
     
  5. captain_video

    captain_video Icon

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    Nov 21, 2005
    I use Channel Master 4228 8-bay bowtie antennas for my setup. I'm in between Baltimore and DC and have two of these antennas pointed in opposite directions. I just use a standard UHF/VHF splitter/combiner, available at any RatShack or Home Depot, to join the two antennas together and a 4-way splitter to feed my three HDTivos and HDTV. If the antenna has sufficient gain you shouldn't need any amplification.
     
  6. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    With a 2 way combiner and a 4-way splitter you are getting quite a bit of signal loss. I think the 2-way has about 3db loss per port (50% of the original signal), and the 4-way is 7db loss per port (25% of the already attenuated signal). So you are getting about 1/8th of the original signal after combining and splitting.

    If your original signal is strong, this should work. If not, you need to boost the signal before the first splitter/combiner - separate amp on each antenna in the case of two antennas.

    Carl
     
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