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Is it polite to tip your Dish Network installer?

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by Cable Lover, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    James, we're beginning to get the picture -- you're (not your) a reluctant tipper. :) But that's ok. To each, his or her own, as the case may be. It's a free country!

    Speaking of which, here's wishing you and everyone a happy and most memorable 4th! :flag: !pride :flag:
     
  2. BobS

    BobS Legend

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    I don't think Denise Richards has a banana (on a permanent basis anyway). Now melons....
     
  3. EntropyByDesign

    EntropyByDesign Cool Member

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    I tipped the guy $20. Not because my install was difficult, but mainly because he spent time explaining how everything worked. But it's not required to tip. Some contractors won't accept tips either.
     
  4. BobS

    BobS Legend

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    I know of no government level (in the U.S.) that permits tipping of its employees. The government is supposed to serve all equitably and a gratutity would (1) skew the relationship and (2) is indistinguishable from a bribe. I feel the same way about a contractor picking up the lunch tab for government employee. Especially when the employee still collects his per diem.

     
  5. SaltiDawg

    SaltiDawg New Member

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    A difference being a bribe is generally paid in anticipation of some future happening. A gratuity is generally paid after-the-fact and without prior promise.

    Huge difference.
     
  6. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    One event's future is another event's past...

    A "gratuity" paid after one service could very well serve as a "bribe" towards a future as-yet-to-be-scheduled service.

    That's one way around looking like giving a bribe when you actually are giving one.

    Consider... A police officer is about to write you a ticket but you offer him $20 if he does not. That is a bribe.

    BUT... If a police officer writes you a ticket, then you "tip" him $20 in hopes that next time you run into him he will remember that and not ticket you in the future... you would have then effectively given a bribe without the immediate appearance of having done so. IF that same officer sees you speeding again and does remember, and doesn't write you a ticket next time... then the bribe worked.
     
  7. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    What an odd conversation this has become ...


    Question: An employee is sent out paid by his employer to give the best service possible to all customers. This employee returns from the worksite with $20 from the customer. Did the employee receive this $20 "completely out of the blue" as they claim or did they agree before the service that "if you do a good job there's something extra in this for you"? If the difference between a tip and a bribe is prior agreement how do we know there isn't a prior agreement? (And I'll dispute that the difference is prior agreement as there is an "agreement" in certain service industries such as with waiters and porters that tips ARE expected. They are even added to the bill automatically in some restaurants. Not every tip agreed to in advance is a bribe. But I digress.)

    Did the employee break any work rules to "earn" this extra $20 (not charging for services that the company would normally take payment for) or compensate the customer in any way for the "tip" (perhaps by leaving supplies behind such as an extra length of cable)?

    If the employee returns without the extra $20 the questions are not as harsh. They may have performed free services that should have been charged or left extra supplies but they didn't do so for personal gain. The personal gain aspect changes the situation.


    And now, for the officer that pulled me over. Wrote me a $200 ticket and I hand him a $20 as a tip. It's probably not going to happen. And unless you're in an area with only one patrol officer it most likely won't likely change whether he lets you go next time. In fact, if he pulls you over again he could make himself another $20 tip. He could even get his fellow officers in on the fun ... that guy in the white bronco tips when you give him a ticket!

    Thanking the officer for giving you a verbal (non-written, no record) warning with a tip would have similar results. That officer and others would become accustomed to being able to pull people over and either make $200 for the government of $20 for themselves depending on if they wrote a ticket. This would be a case of them violating work rules for personal gain. Somehow not writing the ticket and getting a reward seems like a crime.
     
  8. SaltiDawg

    SaltiDawg New Member

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    This makes no sense. I assume that if at a local restaurant a waitress's service meets your standards that you might well tip her. It would be far more likely you would see this service person again then any Dish installer.

    I do not tip Dish service persons, but certainly not for the reason you threw in. :nono2:

    I am a retired 24 year federal employee that worked as a Defense Contractor after I retired as a Submarine Officer. I understand and adhered to the rules on accepting or offering gratuities or even the appearance of such improprieties, but tipping a waitress or tipping a dish installer does not rise to any similar standard.

    If you think it is inappropriate, well simply don't tip.

    Does anyone actually know if E* or D* have a policy on this?
     
  9. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    No doubt. This conversation went WAY off track with discussion of federal employees, etc.

    I feel like I'm in Reservoir Dogs... (warning: language)

    [YOUTUBE]Z-qV9wVGb38[/YOUTUBE]
     
  10. BobS

    BobS Legend

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    Of course you can always plaster your car with stickers you received from the Police Benevolent Fund or whatever when you donated $20. If they don't improve the odds, why do they give them to donors?
     
  11. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Perhaps because the donors think they have something special?
     
  12. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Yeah, those kind of stickers always caused police officers I knew (including me) to look more closely at the car. Honest donors aren't looking for anything in return.;)
     
  13. Cable Lover

    Cable Lover Legend

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    I can't believe my thread is back! If anyone is interested, in regards to my new Dish Net service, I love the 722K, it has so much more storage room then my Insight DVR, and having it able to connect to two TVs is awesome.

    Dish's HD picture quality is great, but so was Insight's Maybe a slight edge to Dish, but without comparing side by side I can't really be sure.
     
  14. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I should have been more clear... I was replying to the splinter-thread that was discussing tipping of other services provided by such people as mail carriers or government work.

    Some jobs carry with them requirements to deny accepting tips OR bribes because a tip can very well be an under-the-table bribe for some future consideration that might be against policy.

    Tipping an installer or a waitress carries no such concerns and isn't in that category.

    That said, I don't know IF Dish installers ever have a no-tipping rule... but if they did, then there must be a reason for it... though I admit I don't know what that reason would be.

    I still maintain my original feelings... which is, in the case of an installer or a wait-staff person... their job is to perform certain services well. IF they perform those services well, then that is what I paid for... and thus, is not deserving of a tip. IF they go above and beyond either because I made a special request OR because they went the extra mile on their own, then that earns a tip.
     
  15. epifano83

    epifano83 Mentor

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    Even though I can never afford to give a cash tip I always offer my tech a cold bottle of water or a cold coke their choice and then I send him or her off with 3 or 4 bottle's of water or cokes his or her;s choice.

    I know for a faq it is appreciated when a customer gives a tip or offers a nice cold beverage , as when I use to work for Mastec I use to get offered cold beverages 40% of the time or sometimes given some cash. In that case I use to stop and get something to eat and drink at the next gas station on the way to the next job as I never took a launch always to busy!

    I also never expected a tip, I alway went out of my way for every customer. Placing their ODU in a easy accessible place while being out of sight. Ran the cabling hidden and straight, I also gave 100% customer education even if they were familiar with the system and at the end of the job I gave them my work cell just in case of any concerns or problems.

    Yes I was under paid by the piece and nickel and dimed for my van and equipment and if their was a call back on the job, in the end the reason why I quite was not because of the customer but the pay and the attitude of some supervisors!
     
  16. Jim5506

    Jim5506 Hall Of Fame

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    I nearly always tip the tech, especially if he is competent.

    These guys do not make a whole lot of money, and I want to encourage their competence and keep the good techs in the pipeline.

    Dish techs do fall under the $7.75 minimum wage guideline, which waitresses do not because of that waitstaff are considered to "need" tips to compensate for their lower minumum wage , we always tip at least 25% usually 33% of the tab.

    I feel that to fail to tip waitstaff because they were just doing their job is cheap and tawdry. If they are incompetent, they get a dollar maybe two, if they are attentive and competent, they not only deserve, but need the tip.
     
  17. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I'm sorry, but what someone's employer pays them is really not my problem.

    If I order something then I expect that for the price I am paying I will get what I ordered. To expect me to pay more as a "tip" is improper. IF I only get what I paid for then there has been no tip earned.

    It's not about being mean or unappreciative or inconsiderate or cheap... it's about what a "tip" is for. A tip is for services rendered above and beyond what is expected.

    I do agree that many in the service industry are underpaid... but they aren't my employees. They need to take their salary up with their boss or see if they can find a job that pays them what they are worth.

    Just because I feel sorry for someone and think they aren't paid well enough is not reason to justify giving a tip. That is reason to give charity, the same as I might to a homeless person... and the homeless person has no money so I'd feel more inclined to give them money for "nothing" than I would a "tip" to someone who is getting paid for doing the job I am already paying for.

    I'm not stingy... I offer drinks and I don't rush. I don't "hover" but I am available if they need help, especially if the guy is alone and I can hold the ladder or hand him a tool or something.

    On your last statement about giving even a poor service some tip because they "need" it... all you are doing is rewarding their poor workmanship/service and encouraging them to continue along that path.

    It's also why I don't like places that "pool" their tips so that those who work harder get the same slice of the pie as those who don't work much at all...

    I can assure you that if you do good work and are friendly and either go beyond on your own or accommodate a special request by me... that I do tip generously. But I feel zero obligation to tip for someone just doing the job I already am paying for in the first place.
     
  18. Wire Nut

    Wire Nut Legend

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    I considered starting a new thread but this one is very thorough. If your installer goes the extra mile, why not? I'm a Dish technician of 2 years, got a record $60 from a customer today! I did a bunch of extra things, wall-mounted a couple tvs and did a few wall fishes but it really helps me know my work is appreciated. We work with impossible deadlines and deal with all kinds of people, sure we get paid but the hack that throws things around generally gets paid the same as true professional.
     
  19. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    On this taxing weekend I suppose my first response would be that it would be OK as long as you report your tips and your not doing work "off the books" that should be done through your employer.

    DISH now sells install services of AV products. They might want the TV mounting to be on the books.
     
  20. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Aside from what James brought up about off-the-books work that some do in order to get around taxes or their employer's cut...

    It is important to note that you did say "extra mile"... Some argue you should give a tip just for getting the job you paid for. I'm fine with tipping when the installer does extra work OR especially when I have asked for custom/extra work. I'm just not for tipping for the sake of tipping.

    Fries are $2 at McDonalds... if I order fries and get them, I don't tip the cashier!

    Some people expect tips just for doing their job... which is counter to what the tip should be for... "extra mile" type stuff earns tips.
     

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