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Is there any 480p programming?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by bighoopla, Jan 24, 2009.

  1. bighoopla

    bighoopla Legend

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    Jan 3, 2009
    I know the following:

    480i = SD programming
    720p = FOXHD, ABCHD, ESPN, etc.
    1080i = NBCHD, CBSHD, HBO, and many others
    1080p = Very few VOD trailers and rumor has it a full movie or two has popped up on occasion


    Is anything broadcast in 480p? I ask because there is a check box for this under:
    -Settings
    -HDTV
    -TV Resolutions tab
     
  2. Michael D'Angelo

    Michael D'Angelo Lifetime Achiever

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    Oct 20, 2006
    No. The option is there because some TV's do not support 480i over HDMI.
     
  3. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    Jan 13, 2007
    Our local PBS broadcasts some of its programming in 480P, on the sub-channels, OTA. It looks as good as store bought DVD's.
     
  4. CorpITGuy

    CorpITGuy Godfather

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    Cool... 480p content in OAR looks GREAT! I think SD gets a bad rap because it looks so bad when you stretch it out, and 99% of folks out there do.

    A guy at work the other day was talking about how awful SD was... he was shocked when I reminded him that DVDs are SD.
     
  5. bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    Makes sense. DVDs are SD in 480p. :D
     
  6. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    I added that as a comparison as some didn't know what 480P actually was.
     
  7. Richard L Bray

    Richard L Bray Legend

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    Aug 19, 2006
    DVDs are recorded as 480i.
     
  8. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    Ones recorded by consumers are, but I beleive, commercial DVD's are, in fact, 480P, my Sony recognizes the couple I just tried as such. Most decent DVD players have progressive scan outputs.
     
  9. bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    Correct, most commercial DVDs are 480p. However if your DVD player is old enough to not have progressive output thru component then you're sending out a 480i signal. Or if you're using composite or Svideo that would be 480i as well. Only way to get 480p is thru component via a progressive scan player. My player is pretty old but does have component outputs and is progressive scan. And I paid an extra $150 for that, I think it was over $400. Now you can get them for $20 at the checkout lane of the local grocery store. Crazy how things advance. :eek2:
     
  10. Richard L Bray

    Richard L Bray Legend

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    Aug 19, 2006
    Commercial DVD's were developed when all TV sets were SD (480i); therefore they are encoded as 480i. After we had HD sets, capable of showing 480p, the better players included a deinterlacing capability so that they could output 480p (reason for the numerous sites that graded the players on their deinterlacing capability). In the last few years, we have "upconverting" players available that could also output 720p or 1080i. Blu Ray and HD DVD were the first commercial disk formats to move beyond 480i (MPEG 2) encoding.

    Please read the following:
    http://www.oppodigital.com/Getting-Most-out-of-DVD-on-HDTV-Display.html

    It includes the following quote:
    "Since DVD video is stored on disc in an interlaced format, in order to view this material on a progressive scan screen the separate fields must first be combined into whole frames through a process called deinterlacing. In order to achieve this result, two interlaced picture fields are merged into a single progressive frame. This may sound simple, but in actuality turns out to be surprisingly difficult to do well. Poor quality deinterlacing results in "jaggies" and combing artifacts when interlaced fields are not matched together correctly. U nfortunately, deinterlacing can be easily complicated by the nature of film-based, video-based, or mixed-source content.

    Take the example of a DVD movie that was originally produced and released on 35mm film for theatrical release. Film-based motion pictures are photographed at a rate of 24 picture frames per second (fps). When the film is scanned into video to be released on DVD, the publisher has to convert 24 film frames into 60 interlaced video fields because the DVD must produce a rate of 30 frames per second in order to be displayed on a television. In order to achieve this, the conversion needs to produce 5 video fields from each 2 original film frames. The first film frame produces 3 video fields: a field of the odd numbered scan lines (1, 3, 5, 7, etc.), a field of the even numbered scan lines (2, 4, 6, 8, etc.), and a repeated field of the odd numbered scan lines. The second film frame produces 2 video fields: a field of the even numbered scan lines, and a field of the odd numbered scan lines. This complicated conversion process is known in the industry as 3:2 pull-down.

    When the DVD is played on a regular Standard Definition TV, due to the interlaced nature the picture quality is as good as SDTV can get. However, when a progressive scan or upconverting DVD player deinterlaces the video, it becomes tricky to accurately reproduce the original film frames. An unsophisticated DVD player simply combines each two video fields into a progressive frame. This resulting first frame may be the same as the original film frame, but the second frame will be a mix-up of the odd numbered scan lines from the first original film frame and the even numbered scan lines of the second film frame. Although the two film frames are only slightly different, this error is enough to produce visible artifacts such as blurry pictures and jagged lines. A good progressive scan DVD player must detect that the DVD is mastered from a film source and use intelligent deinterlacing algorithms to accurately reconstruct the original film frames."
     
  11. dodge boy

    dodge boy R.I.P. Chris Henry

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    I recorded "Quantum Leap" off ION channel 305 today and I am watching it now with Native on and it is 480P
     
  12. MountainMan10

    MountainMan10 Icon

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    480i will be output as 480p if you do not have 480i selected in the supported resolutions. I use Native On an have 480p, 720p, 1080i and 1080p selected. So all my SD channels are outputs as 480p.
     
  13. bighoopla

    bighoopla Legend

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    Jan 3, 2009
    Does forcing it to display in 480p improve the quality of SD programs?
     
  14. mdavej

    mdavej Hall Of Fame

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    I don't think there is anything you can do to overcome the damage done by D*'s massive compression of SD.
     
  15. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    Jan 13, 2007
    Generally no. It will, ever so slightly, if the HR has a better scaler than your TV. Try it and see, if it looks better to you, set it that way:)
     

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