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It's Official: DIRECTV 3D coming in June

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Stuart Sweet, Jan 6, 2010.

  1. Jan 7, 2010 #41 of 286
    Greg Alsobrook

    Greg Alsobrook Lifetime Achiever

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    I'm not too familiar with how it works, but some TVs are what's called "3D ready".. meaning they can do 3D if a PC is connected to it (running some software I assume). The Samsung DLP my mom bought about a year ago had this in the description.
     
  2. Jan 7, 2010 #42 of 286
    Alan Gordon

    Alan Gordon Chancellor

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    There was a list I was looking at the other day of 3D capable displays. Basically, if you don't have a Mitsubishi or Samsung DLP, you're out of luck.

    However, it will be a nice feature for those of us without one sometime in the future.

    ~Alan
     
  3. Jan 7, 2010 #43 of 286
    Cyclone99

    Cyclone99 Cool Member

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    It's really only TWO actual channels, the PPV one and the 'free' one. The third one is Directv On Demand, which would be downloads and not taking up channel bandwidth.

    I don't see how they could time multiplex the PPV and free channel. They are going to want the free channel running all the time for store demos and such.
     
  4. Jan 7, 2010 #44 of 286
    bjdraw

    bjdraw Mentor

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    The other thing I learned but didn't make it in my post was that the STB treats the 3D stream like any other, so the DVR has full trick play, record ability.

    And to the skeptics, let me tell you. I was the exact same way. I thought it was a gimmick, things thrown at you in cartoons etc. Well seeing a College Football game in 3D changed all that for me, and no they didn't once throw the football at the camera. So before you knock it, try the latest technology watching your favorite content and then tell me what you think.
     
  5. Jan 7, 2010 #45 of 286
    bjdraw

    bjdraw Mentor

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    The 3D content is 1080p24, but other resolutions could be supported, but I doubt 1080p60 will be one of them. DirecTV isn't increasing the frame rate like 3D Blu-ray, they are just storing both eyes in one frame and letting the glasses split it out.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2010 #46 of 286
    bjamin82

    bjamin82 Godfather

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    Colorado...
  7. Jan 7, 2010 #47 of 286
    Greg Alsobrook

    Greg Alsobrook Lifetime Achiever

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    Kinda what I figured after a quick google. Please post that list if you have a chance.
     
  8. Jan 7, 2010 #48 of 286
    Stanley Kritzik

    Stanley Kritzik Legend

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    In the "good old days", products like TV's and radios were pretty static -- like sofas and dining room tables. These days, they are technology products, and as features advance, circuits become more sophisticated, inventions occur, obsolescence sets in. Thus, pre-Blu-Ray DVDs are obsolete. They work, but only to a degree. Old cell phones aren't i-phones or Droids. Older flat screen sets (like mine) are good only to 1080i. And, in the 3D instance under discussion, pre-3D screens won't do it.

    Back in 1992, my company bought a disk drive for our office computer from IBM. The drive cost $18,000 for 600 GB of storage. Today, we get a terabyte of faster storage for a lot less money. Look at 10 megapixel camera costs and their storage card costs today, vs. five years ago.

    In short, the video home entertainment world is part of technology, and that means that every time one buys a product, one is buying, to some degree or other, into functional obsolescence. Stick with your existing stuff (if it still works) and miss the new features. Buy it for $2,000, and two years later, it is worth $200 used. Those who are early adopters, at the top of the price curve, will lose the most value -- the price of pioneering.

    That's the reality we're living with. Keep what you've got, and "pass" on stereo sound, HD, 3D, or Blu-Ray. Or, at some time when you feel the need, and can afford it, take your loss and upgrade.

    Stan
     
  9. Jan 7, 2010 #49 of 286
    Alan Gordon

    Alan Gordon Chancellor

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    I tried looking for where I thought I saw the link prior to me posting about it, and couldn't find it. However, it appears another poster found what I was looking for:

    Thanks!

    ~Alan
     
  10. Jan 7, 2010 #50 of 286
    Greg Alsobrook

    Greg Alsobrook Lifetime Achiever

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    Ah. Nice. Missed that. Thanks!
     
  11. Jan 7, 2010 #51 of 286
    hdprice

    hdprice New Member

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    The specs for the required TV are of the biggest interest to me. I bought a new Mitsubishi last year that is "3D Ready". This peaked my interest. I bought an Nvidia 3D system. You have to run this from a PC. The system has the required shutter glasses and an IR emitter that plugs into the PC via USB and the TV via a 3 pin VESA socket.

    To get 3D out of this the PC must support 1080i60 and you have to put the Mitsu into "3D mode". The results are amazing. Not at all like the cardboard colored lenses some mentioned above. It's really very convincing 3D, full frame, full color, flicker free.

    I can't believe that DTV would launch a service that only worked with TVs from one vendor. I'm hoping/expecting that the solution will have a similar config, just replacing the PC in my description above with the DTV STB. I think the HR20 has USB ports that could be used to drive an IR emitter..
     
  12. Jan 7, 2010 #52 of 286
    aramus8

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  13. Jan 7, 2010 #53 of 286
    Cyclone99

    Cyclone99 Cool Member

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    In the HDGuru article late last month about DTV's 3D plans, they indicated that a "forthcoming 3d converter box" would be needed to view the DTV 3D programming with current DLP 3D ready sets.

    Mits has since announced the 3DC-1000 3D adapter which is supposed to be an "easy and affordable" way to convert video from upcoming 3D blu-ray players to the checkerboard format that the DLP sets need. It seems likely that the same adapter would be used for DTV 3D.
     
  14. Jan 7, 2010 #54 of 286
    ptuck874

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    Ok here is a dumb question for anybody out there that has used the new type of 3d glasses. I wear regular glasses (and kinda have a big head lol :) ), how does those new types feel on ya? I personally will not be upgrading cause' I just got a new tv last year, but in any case, do they feel ok? Opinions?
     
  15. Jan 7, 2010 #55 of 286
    smiddy

    smiddy Tain't ogre til its ogre

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    I would suspect it won't be like that. The way I understand the new technology on 3D is that there are two polarized (one left hand circular and the other right hand circular) signals on the screen at one time. The screen itself, or a filter attachment, has to be there, in addition you need polarized glasses to be able to watch the show. This is the current technology that is being used in IMAX 3D theaters.
     
  16. Jan 7, 2010 #56 of 286
    Mrmiami

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    The thing I noticed about the TV's that are 3D ready is that they would all be a step backwards IMO, back to the bigger box-lamp type (with a dimmer picture and terrible off center viewing) or Laser view with color blooming picture. Neither one of these types would tear me away from thinner,crisper, HD picture with above adverage off center viewing of HD content on the newer LED LCD's, Plasma or LCD TV's we have now. The technology is a step forward but in order to view it you have to use a TV that's about 3 steps backwards, that is not what I would refer to as an upgrade of my tv in order to adopt the 3D viewing experience IMO.

    So what exactly are some of the specs for the newer 3D capable TV's? If anyone has knowledge please post.
     
  17. Jan 7, 2010 #57 of 286
    dhines

    dhines Godfather

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    i attended a 3-D showing of the USC/OSU game (this past college football season). i have to say that i was not impressed at all. i am trying to think what bothered me the most, but it would have to be the lack of good camera angles.

    as i recall, (i watched the game at the on campus basketball arena) that my opinion was pretty common among the other viewers.
     
  18. Jan 7, 2010 #58 of 286
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    I've seen 3 different "form factors" on those glasses....but the new generation 3D glasses are totally different than those cardboard red & green lens thingys of the past.

    Generally, the ones I've seen are light weight, using grey-black polarizing lens.

    I'll be at the CES this weekend, and will surely be at several 3D demos there...and will perhaps finds even more sample versions there.
     
  19. Jan 7, 2010 #59 of 286
    Hdhead

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    So will D* count the 3 new 3D channels as 9 new HD channels:grin:
     
  20. Jan 7, 2010 #60 of 286
    jford951

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    Sorry but I am really new to the whole 3d thing but I have one of the TV's listed at the link below. So can anyone tell me if that means I will be able to use directv 3d stations? I am sure I will need some kinda of glasses when the time comes and firmware updates but is all the hardware manufactures going to use a standard setup or will different signals and tv's need different glasses? http://www.3dmovielist.com/3dhdtvs.html


    thanks
    Jeff
     

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