1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Locals off Locals on. Please help!

Discussion in 'Legislative and Regulatory Issues' started by sig, Apr 24, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. sig

    sig Cool Member

    11
    0
    Apr 24, 2005
    Okay, here is my question. I hope someone here can help me out. I have been with Dish since 1996. I live in the L.A. and it is my DMA local. I subscribe to 2 distant locals, for a total of 3 network areas subscribed to.

    I was sent a letter from Dish asking me to choose either my local DMA or my Distants. I chose my Distants, and I assume to remain "grandfathered" in.

    On April 15th I lost my locals. Called Dish, they said too bad it's the new law. America, love it or leave it attitude. (some of these CSR's were in the 5th grade when I signed up for Dish in 1996).

    I ordered KTLA as a Superstation. KTLA is also a local channel here in L.A. (I wanted some access to my local news). Exactly 48 after ordering KTLA, I began to receive ALL of my locals in L.A. again. So I cancelled KTLA. I made no mention to my Dish CSR about being able to view my L.A. local DMA. Exactly 48 hours later I lost ALL my L.A. DMA for the second time.

    Next I called random CSR's and asked them if ordering KTLA would affect my status as being "granfathered" in. They had no clue what I meant. L.A. is a local for me, as is KTLA, but they tell me that KTLA doesn't count as a local cause it's a superstation. So I continue to wonder why ordering and cancelling KTLA triggers ALL of my locals on and off.

    I decided to again order KTLA and guess what? 48 hours later, my L.A locals appeared and not just the Network DMA, but All my L.A. WB's local PBS channels, and L.A. Spanish stations. (as I had prior to April 15th, when they were taken away).

    So now I call Dish to ask them what my billing looks like. They tell my I have my L.A. DMA and my distant locals showing up on my bill, and I am now eligible to keep it all. My KTLA ala carte fee of 1.50 was removed, because it would be redundant now that I have my L.A. DMA back.


    On April 15th when this hassle occurred, I was told I had to chose one over the other. Local or distants, now I have a choice? How confusing is that!?

    I have made many calls to Dish. Some CSR supervisors tell me I will loose my Distant locals in 30 days, unless I cancel my locals ASAP. Others tell me that in 2000, I was grandfathered in and am receiving waivers from my local networks, and I need to do nothing but watch TV and relax with a beer.

    Who do I turn to? Who do I trust? Dish network has done a horrible job of keeping me informed. So I now turn to the internet, and you kind folks here for help.

    Am I going to loose my distant locals? I refuse to give up my distant locals, and don't want to be forced to chose! Somebody please help, before we become vulnerable to calling DR Phil for advice, cause our family is broken up over this mess.
     
  2. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Hall Of Fame

    5,468
    0
    Jan 15, 2004
    DOUBLE post in the same forum even. :mad: :mad: :mad:

    If I'd known that, I would NOT have answered your other post. :(
     
  3. sig

    sig Cool Member

    11
    0
    Apr 24, 2005
    Sorry to everyone here on DBSTAlK for the double post. Us newcomers get lost and confused around here. I deleted the duplcated material.

    I would still appreciate some more opinions on this. In reading the many comments in this Forum, it seems to me that I qualify for both my locals and my distants, in that I was "grandfathered" in 1999.
     
  4. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Hall Of Fame

    5,468
    0
    Jan 15, 2004
    OK - no problem! And BTW, welcome aboard!

    Here's my reply moved from the other thread, and we'll continue here. :)

    You're treading on real thin ice (playing with your networks).

    If your account is marked with L.A as a LOCAL package, it's VERY likely you WILL lose your distants. CSRs are clueless.

    Note that grandfathering is a big question - if you got the postcard, AFAIK, it's history.

    If you're in the Grade B signal area of L.A., you proably lose.
     
  5. sig

    sig Cool Member

    11
    0
    Apr 24, 2005
    Okay thanks for the welcome!

    The area in L.A. where I live has no signal to L.A. at all. I could place an antenna 100 feet high and I might get a couple of very fuzzy locals. I was able to receive waivers back in the late 90's because I have no signal to TV.

    Still makes no sense to me how they can yank my Distants, because Dish added ALL of my locals when I ordered KTLA. I voted to keep my Distants. Why would I be getting both Locals and Distants, if I am not eligable?

    IF I am to believe a CSR Supervisor I spoke to, I will automaticaly loose my Distants in 30 days. Or If I am to believe the othe CSR Supervisor I spoke with the next day, I am okay to keep both Locals and Distants.

    I am going to call a 3rd CSR Supervisor, and see what they say.
     
  6. sig

    sig Cool Member

    11
    0
    Apr 24, 2005
    Got right through to Dish Network's CSR in the Philippines. CSR would not let me through to a supervisor, but tells me that they do have record that I did elect to receive my distants.

    As for who added ALL of my locals (25 plus channels), they could not tell me. I even let them know it was not me who ordered them. Dish Philippines, can only say that I will not lose my distants, cause I elected to keep them. They can't tell me why I have ALL my locals and my distants, or if my locals will remain.

    Dish has clearly gone down hill with service. What happened to the days when the people in Littleton CO answered the phones, and gave a no BS answer?
     
  7. sig

    sig Cool Member

    11
    0
    Apr 24, 2005
    I am not a lawyer, but I read this to say that if I anyone was receiving Distant locals signals as of December 8, 2004, then you will continue to receive them.
    Any comments???

    C. Section 209: Implementation of Section 339(c)(4)(D)
    14. Section 209 of the SHVERA creates new Section 339(c)(4)(D) of the Communications Act.
    It requires the Commission to exempt satellite carriers from the signal testing requirements of Section 339(c)(4)(A) when the request comes from a satellite subscriber in a market in which local-into-local service is offered. Signal testing was required by the SHVIA so that subscribers could attempt to demonstrate that they could not receive a signal of Grade B intensity or better and thereby qualify for a distant network signal. This requirement is revised by Section 204 of the SHVERA, which provides that where local-into-local service is offered, subscribers are not eligible to receive distant analog signals unless they were getting distant analog signals as of December 8, 2004. Consequently, there is no need for a signal strength test to measure whether the analog signal can be received at households in markets in which there is local-into-local service or such service is introduced before a subscriber seeks distant analog signals of network stations. Section 209, accordingly, requires the Commission to exempt satellite carriers from complying with the testing requirements in Section 339(c)(4)(A) of the Act. The rule implementing this requirement will be added to part 73 of the Commission’s rules as part of the rules that codify the measurements and independent testing required by the SHVIA.
     
  8. Greg Bimson

    Greg Bimson Hall Of Fame

    3,918
    0
    May 5, 2003
    If you live in the Los Angeles DMA, KTLA is a local channel. It does not matter that it is a superstation: In LA, KTLA is local. By subscribing to a local channel, you should lose access to your distant network service.

    The law states if you were "grandfathered", you had to make a choice between either your distant network service or local channels. The part you found about an existing subscriber keeping both distant network and local service if the subscriber was receiving distant service on or before 8 December, 2004, is only for those subscribers that were in a true "white area". "Grandfathered" subscribers had to make a choice.

    And once a "grandfathered" subscriber chose distant network service, the local channels would go away. And once the subscriber started local channel service, the distant network service is supposed to be terminated.
     
  9. sig

    sig Cool Member

    11
    0
    Apr 24, 2005
    Can you please explain to me what a White area is?
    Are those of us on the West coast the first to be making these changes, or have All Dish subcribers gone through this yet?
     
  10. Greg Bimson

    Greg Bimson Hall Of Fame

    3,918
    0
    May 5, 2003
    If you received a postcard, you are "grandfathered". A true white-area is a place where:

    a) the predicted signal strength for your location is below a specific intensity, described as Grade B, -or- (if the issue is pressed)
    b) a signal test is done and it is found your location does not receive a Grade B or better signal.

    At this point, because of the SHVERA, your only remedy is to request a waiver. More than likely, you will not receive it.
     
  11. Brian

    Brian Mentor

    39
    0
    Jul 23, 2004
    On a side / almost related topic.... If you moved to a white area now, could you get the distant feeds? or only the locals in the market serviced?

    I figure I know the answer, but I'll ask anyway....

    Thanks

    -Brian
     
  12. Greg Bimson

    Greg Bimson Hall Of Fame

    3,918
    0
    May 5, 2003
    If you move to a market where local channels are offered, you cannot get the distant analog networks.

    If you move to a market where local channels are NOT offered, then you must live in a white area in order to get distant network service.
     
  13. sig

    sig Cool Member

    11
    0
    Apr 24, 2005
    My area will not get TV with any kind of an antenna. Many years ago I received waivers from 3 of my local networks, when I wrote to them explaining that our area was remote and has no TV service. Eventually as many of our neighbors put up Dishes, the entire area received waivers. I could type in a neighbors address on the Dish website to verify it. I can't remember what year it was, maybe 1998 or so.

    Odd to live in the L.A. DMA and not have a tv signal, but it happens.

    So does that mean I still don't qualify for both Distants and locals? (even though I have been getting both for 5 days now).
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page