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Lost the rcvrs on my iPad

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Connected Home' started by scm, Jun 23, 2014.

  1. scm

    scm Mentor

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    0
    Jan 21, 2007
    Ok, had the app working fine - could control all seven rcvrs from my iPad, as well as download from my Nomad.

    TWC is going to push us up to 300MBPS, but you need a DOCSIS 6.0 compliant Cable Modem. Decided it was time to toss the leased CM, so I bought the Netgear C3700-100NAS. It includes WiFi, and Cnet loved it. Two Ethernet ports out.

    At the same time, my Swim died, and DTV comes out to fix it (after I installed the new CM). When the system comes back up, the iPad says "out of home" and can't see the Nomad. Make sure the receivers are connected to the net - even put the IP addresses in the box on the iPad - "invalid receiver".

    So here's where I think the problem is: all wireless is coming out of the cable modem router. One of the two CM ports goes to the Ooma box - the other to a Linksys small office router. The four ports on this router go to a eight port powered switch (for the Cat 6 in every bedroom), to the family room equipment cabinet (powered switch there for the AV rcvr, Roku, Apple TV, and a DVR), and to the DTV internet pickup (#4 was the wireless network access point now made redundant).

    So I am thinking the Linksys router is the problem - it could be assigning IP addresses downstream of the WiFi cable modem router, and therefore the iPad can't "see" the DTV devices. If I am right, then is the solution to replace the Linksys router with a gigabit powered switch? Should that fix the problem? And if it isn't, does anyone have any ideas?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

    9,673
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    Sep 27, 2007
    Lake Norman, NC
    Turn off DHCP on the Linksys, don't use the WAN port and assign it an IP. Gateway should be your upstream router. Or replace it with a switch.
     
  3. Steve

    Steve DIRECTV A-Team

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    Aug 22, 2006
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    Turn of UPnP as well.

    And turn off UPnP as well. Configuring it like this allows it to act like a switch.
     
  4. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
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    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    You need to lose the Linksys router. Having two routers will haunt you.
     
  5. Steve

    Steve DIRECTV A-Team

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    Aug 22, 2006
    Lower...
    It's actually pretty straightforward, if you can follow directions. E.g, here's what D-Link says:


    I'd only add: "put a piece of tape over the WAN port, so you don't inadvertently plug into it."
     
  6. scm

    scm Mentor

    33
    0
    Jan 21, 2007
    Great advice. On the road, so will try them this weekend.

    Thanks, all!
     
  7. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
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    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    Or you could just unplug it and have one less failure point to worry about. If you're hanging onto a router because you can turn it into a switch or a WAP, you're only outsmarting yourself.
     
  8. Steve

    Steve DIRECTV A-Team

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    Aug 22, 2006
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    Switches and waps aren't more reliable pieces of electronics, so I can only assume proper configuration is daunting for you.
     
  9. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
    182
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    It isn't that it is daunting, it is that you have to go out of your way to disable something that may forget it is disabled. I have to redo a Wi-fi router at work every once in awhile when it stops being a WAP and reverts to setting up an independent network.

    It is a lot like using a computer for a DVR; many steps to make sure the computer doesn't try to "enhance" the experience with a screen blanker or putting the hard drive to sleep.
     
  10. Steve

    Steve DIRECTV A-Team

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    Aug 22, 2006
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    I've been deploying wireless routers as WAPs for myself, friends and family for years and never had one spontaneously revert to DHCP or UPnP "on". I found the important thing is to cover up that WAN port, so no one plugs into it inadvertently.
     

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