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Missing Dallas Teen, Was Mistakenly Deported To Colombia By Authorities

Discussion in 'The OT' started by cj9788, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. Jan 5, 2012 #1 of 16
    cj9788

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    "A Dallas teenager who has been missing for two years was mistakenly deported to Colombia by authorities after she was arrested for theft, according to a Dallas-area news outlet.

    Jakadrien Turner, who is now 15, ran away from home after her parents' divorce and her grandfather's death, according to WFAA. Shortly after, she was arrested in Houston for theft, and gave the police a fake name. But that name belonged to a Colombian national who was in the United States illegally, which led federal authorities to deport Turner — an African-American who does not speak Spanish."


    I am all for tougher enforcement of immigration laws, but this is government run a muck. Someone some where failed toverify this girls identity. I know she gave a false name and the name that she gave was an illegal from Columbia who had warrants out for her arrest. I don't want to make any false presumptions but I find it inconceivable that ICE and or local police failed to id the runaway by finger prints or photos.
     
  2. Jan 5, 2012 #2 of 16
    phrelin

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    And Congress passed a law "reluctantly" signed by the President at the end of the year that adds to the authority of the military to detain on American soil without habeas corpus rights an American suspected of terrorist activity. What could possibly go wrong...?

    Used to be, regular old-fashioned judges were the only ones who could deprive Americans of their lawful rights.
     
  3. Jan 5, 2012 #3 of 16
    Earl Bonovich

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    Having seen multiple coverages of this all day today...

    This is by far an anonmolly to the process, and some thing did just break.

    As for the finger print check...

    If the girl her self wasn't in the system, it wouldn't have found her anyway.
    So if she continued to say she was "so and so" consistantly...

    To me, the question is, is at any point... she declared who she really was... and did they follow-up on that.

    Because logically, if you were saying you were someone else... and you said you where here from Columbia, illegally... the presumption would be that you kept yourself out of the system...
     
  4. Jan 5, 2012 #4 of 16
    phrelin

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    I have an easier question - did anybody attempt to engage her in an in-depth conversation in Spanish? It isn't like there's nobody around the Houston area ICE operation that speaks Spanish. Good grief.
     
  5. Jan 5, 2012 #5 of 16
    Earl Bonovich

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    And no one from Columbia, that has taken the time and engergy to become fluent in English... could fake that they didn't know Spanish?

    Ultimately, something did screw up and I hope the reason is found so that it can be avoided again.

    But by all accounts, this girl didn't do herself any favors in this process..
    She was even willing to do JAILTIME under this false identity....
     
  6. Jan 5, 2012 #6 of 16
    cj9788

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    I may be mistaken, but the name she gave belonged to a 22 year old Colombian who had arrest warrants. One would presume that the real Colombian's finger prints and photo would be on record in the county that issued the warrants. I find it very hard to believe that arrest warrants were issued on some one without a photo or fingerprint. Anythings possible. Also she was claiming to be 22 years old, I understand it is not out of the realm of possibility that she looks older than 15.
     
  7. Jan 5, 2012 #7 of 16
    phrelin

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    She was a 13-year-old English-only-speaking American black girl who was mistaken for a 22-year-old Columbian illegal immigrant with arrest warrants.

    Did she make a mistake or two, sure. But we have a justice system in the 21st Century that allowed this to happen.

    It's the most egregious of errors. I'm sure by skipping careful, public and expensive trials before real judges they don't make any less egregious errors regularly causing significant pain to people.:rolleyes:
     
  8. Jan 5, 2012 #8 of 16
    Earl Bonovich

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    She was 14 when she ran away from home.

    She was arrested (and all of this started) about 6 months later.

    And honestly, today... 15-22... the mistake can be made on appearence.

    Again... as they have covered extensively today, this is an anonmoly and they are trying to figure out where the process broke.... the assumption it is when they were validing finger prints...

    But who knows what kind of information/details were comming from Columbia, off the one person with the same name... it is not like people don't share the same name.

    If she continued the lie, basically identify theft/falsify... you can't see where she plays a major part in this break down? Is it always the government's fault?

    I tend to believe, they get it WAY RIGHT more often then they get it wrong.
    Magnitudes times more often correct, than wrong.

    There will always be mistakes, by definition... the chance for a mistake is always there...
     
  9. Jan 5, 2012 #9 of 16
    Getteau

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    That's what I'm curious about as well. Given how overworked ICE is, I could easily see a situation where things were dropped. Especially given that she seemed to be a very willing participant in the entire situation. For example, she gives a fake name, they came back and said, Miss so and so, you have warrants out for your arrest on X and Y and because of that, we are going to deport you to Columbia. If she then says Yep, that's me, go ahead and deport me. How much father do you think ICE is going to go. They were probably thinking, wow, we finally caught a break and arrested someone who is admitting to everything she has done.
     
  10. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone DBSTalk Club

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    I guess she shouldn't have run away from home.

    Or stole.

    Or given a fake name to the police.
     
  11. dpeters11

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    It is more extreme, but not all that unsimilar to people having trouble getting on a flight because someone with their name, or using it as an alias is on the no fly list. We've had 6 year olds have to go through hoops to fly because they happen to have the same name.
     
  12. phrelin

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    Yep, that's true.
    Heck they probably thought "this is too good to be true.":sure:
     
  13. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Warrants are issued all the time for subjects that there is no photo or fingerprints on file for.

    - Merg
     
  14. Getteau

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    The more I've read about this story, the less bad I feel for her.

    From what I read last night, she was arrested for shoplifting/theft. She told them she was the Colombian lady and then provided either the police with the Colombians ID (some people say it was an actual ID, other say she just knew all the info). She was tried and convicted of the theft charge and then ICE was brought in. At that point, she went to court to an immigration hearing where a judge who ordered her to be deported. After that, the Colombian embassy stepped in, gave her a Colombian passport and brought her back to Colombia. Once she arrived in Colombia, she was given "work authorization for training at a call center as part of the government's "Welcome Home" program." She then proceeded to get a job and have a life in Colombia (she had a Face Book page where she talked about how she was looking for another job and was thinking about moving to Mexico or going to see friends in Houston or Dallas). So it doesn't seem like she put up much of a fight to prevent getting deported. Not that it really matters to why she was deported, but she is now pregnant. I'm wondering if that's some of the reason for her wanting to go back to Dallas.

    It also seems that many of the news articles are playing fast and loose with her age and how long she was in Colombia. She ran away two years ago when she was 13. However, she wasn't arrested in Houston until March of last year and was deported some time after that. The Colombian government picked her up in December and placed her in protective custody. So she was only on her own in Colombia for 9 or so months. It's still a long time for a 14/15 year old to be on their own in a foreign country. However, she wasn't deported when she was 13 and didn't live in Columbia for 2 years like many of the stories are trying to imply.


    http://www.cnn.com/2012/01/05/us/texas-colombia-teen/index.html

    and this article has a lot of good details on what happened during the various phases of the arrest, detention and deportation.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...orted-wound-pregnant-imprisoned-Colombia.html
     
  15. Michael H..

    Michael H.. Member

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    First time I've seen (or even noticed) this "Special Interest Thread" and not at all familiar with the subject matter requirements/restrictions, so I'll refrain from the "What does this have to do with DBS?"
    But I'll chime in and second the response above...

    and apportion the responsibility for the girl's predicament as follows:
    girl/runaway/criminal: 100%
    la migra: ZERO

    if I purposely stand on the interstate in the middle of the fast lane, and a car obliterates me, I don't necessarily think the driver is to blame... even minutely...
    people need to be held accountable for their own actions.
     
  16. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    The topic of this sub-forum is The OT, which is for anything off-topic. As long as it is basically family friendly, it can be posted here.

    - Merg
     

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