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Moving With No DTV Option?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Trainerman, Jun 10, 2013.

  1. Trainerman

    Trainerman Cool Member

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    Jul 14, 2008
    Quick question for those in the know. What if you move and your new landlord refuses to sign a release and/or you don't have a line of sight at the new place. Does DTV still make you honor your contract or do you have to pay the etf to get out of it?

    Thanks for your time.
     
  2. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    If no line of sight, you would be released. I don't think a landlord can just deny it for any reason, but I'm no expert in OTARD. It may take two checks though, depending on the reason for no line of sight.
     
  3. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    You can have the tech close the WO as NLOS either way. A generous tip might help.
     
  4. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Cincinnati
    Do they require a second opinion? When I first subscribed, I was told nlos but that triggered a need for a second opinion that came with a different answer. Of course this is more for a tree than something like an apartment on the north side of the building
     
  5. samrs

    samrs MANC DBSTalk Club

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    Flat Branch, NC
    We use No Landlord Permission because it dosn't require a second opinion. That wont work on a movers if the customer dosn't want to pay the ETF, it has to be No Line of Site. At least thats been my experience.

    Second opinions are kind of a curious thing. A supervisor is supposed to do the honors but...mine just asks me what the customer wants. I tell him I used my DNA and Dish Pointer App and they are convinced. He does the second opinion from where ever. If Peds48 calls then he is likely to show up himself or send another tech out. The same day. Work orders can't stay open or be rescheduled.

    We service an AF Base that is kind of strict, current policy states the dish has to be pole mounted and can't break the front plane of the quarters. I went out for an ODU Relocate on a new customer it was the second one, the first one hadn't been properly notated with a second opinion. The Dish was in front of the plane of the quarters by five feet. There was No Line of Site to the 103 behind the plane. It shouldn't have been installed. The customer didn't pay the ETF.
     
  6. Volatility

    Volatility Legend

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    May 22, 2010
    The landlord can not tell you that you can not have sattelite television just because, only state where you can or can not mount the dish. More info at www.directv.com/fcc If the installer determines there is no line of sight and closes the work order out with NLOS, the ecf would be waived.
     
  7. goinsleeper

    goinsleeper Godfather

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    May 22, 2012
    Keep in mind, if the technician finds line of sight but the landlord will not allow him to install it there, you can still be charged for the agreement. NLOS basically means there is no way to get line of sight at that location.
     
  8. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    NE FL
    Landlords have more authority than an HOA.

    So if your 'final' issue is the landlord refusing to sign (which isn't always a requirement), I suggest you read the FCC's OTARD and see what does and what doesn't apply in your situation.
     
  9. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Newfoundland...
    Wanna Bet. You would be surprised.
     
  10. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Yes , I've already been to court from a tenant putting a Wildblue dish on my metal roof. Lets just say the judge told him flatout its not his property, he needs written permission to alter my property. He tried the same old bit that I can't stop him from choosing a provider. Boy was he wrong!
     
  11. Volatility

    Volatility Legend

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    That is where it draws the line. He installed a dish on your metal roof, your property. Of course they would need your permission, that was silly of them. If they installed it like say on a tripod on their porche if they had one without damaging your property then he may have had a case. May have had ;)
     
  12. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    Jackson
    Maybe I read it different than you did but I believe that Volatility was agreeing with you...He said the landlord can tell you where you can and where you can't mount the dish...which is 100% correct. There are only a few places that you could mount a dish in most locations that would not be common areas in most apt or duplex situations.
     
  13. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Newfoundland...
    Its not even so much that they needed a tripod, All they would have had to do was ask me , and I would have let them mount it in a location that we all could live with. Not my $30,000 metal roof.

    The only reason I commented was just to make sure people understand that the landlord can prevent you from installing a dish when it comes to destruction or alteration of property.

    Tripod away, just don't bolt it down to my deck.
     

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