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Need help with installing the LNB Triple

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by brooksb, Nov 1, 2004.

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  1. brooksb

    brooksb New Member

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    Oct 31, 2004
    JUst purchased a HDTV. Getting ready to install the new LNB triple. The salesman said I wouldn't be able to find the 3 satellites without a meter. Has any one installed this unit yourself and if so how did you make out with finding the 3 satellites.

    Bobby Brooks
     
  2. Sky I

    Sky I AllStar

    57
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    Sep 22, 2004
    Welcome to DBSTalk :goodjob:

    The dish kit will have instructions that cover the dish assembly, how to mount it and basic info on grounding...etc.
    Your receiver is your meter.
    1 - Make sure that your mast (or pole) is level.
    2 - Plug in your receiver press Menu on your remote and go to the System Setup/Install screen and enter your zip code. This will provide the dish setup information:
    AZ (azimuth) the direction you need to point the dish.
    EL (elevation) the degree setting you need to set the pole mounting bracket to (up or down).
    Skew (or tilt) the setting in degrees you need to set the circular plate on the pole mounting bracket. This setting is normally set and secured and not changed. The EL can be changed during signal peaking.

    After setting your dish on the mast and pointing to the approximate direction (AZ) from above (use a compass), run your coax to the receiver.
    In the System/Install screen there is a tab for Signal. Right arrow on the remote to highlight Source (satellite). This is your signal meter.
    At the bottom of this screen it will tell you if you are pointing at the wrong satellite and your signal strength.
    Read the info with your dish kit and receiver....The pictures help make sense out of this seemingly confusing jabber.

    Have Fun :joy:
     
  3. DBSPaul

    DBSPaul Mentor/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Mar 26, 2002
    Granted, I've done enough installs in my time that I'm probably a little better than a newbie, but I just recently put up a phase III (Funai one at Best Buy). Just make certain that the mast is properly plumb - the Funai one had a little "level" bubble sitting in the end of the mast and you just get the bubble in the circle (I checked it with my mag level because I'd never seen the little bubble level before - nice little item but you never know how accurate those are).

    I set tilt and elevation on the dish prior to placing the assembly on the mast, and when I hooked up a receiver to aim it, it already had signal! (That's never happened before.) Did a little tweaking to find the best overall for 3 slots, tightened it, and then set about routing the wires.

    As I said, I've done enough of these (both Dish and D*) for friends, family, etc. to be a little better than novice, but it's definitely doable.
     
  4. brooksb

    brooksb New Member

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    Oct 31, 2004
    Paul, Thanks for the info. I have installed 4 other dishes before and have had no issues. It was the salesman who said I would need a meter. I use my son as a meter, he runs between the dish and the T.V.

    agian thanks,

    Bobby
     
  5. tds4182

    tds4182 Legend

    201
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    Jul 17, 2003
    Make sure that your mounting pole is dead-on plumb. Also it's a good idea to invest in/borrow a couple of cheap handy-talkies so that you can communicate with the person who is reading the meter inside the house.

    A good, reliable compass (and knowing how to read it) helps with the initial aiming of the dish.

    After you have a good signal, tweaking it to prime readings is just a matter of slowly moving the dish and exercising patience. Once you've optimized your readings, tighten it down good and snug and enjoy!




     
  6. DBSPaul

    DBSPaul Mentor/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Mar 26, 2002
    Well, that's one way of doing it... I have an older (now deactivated) Hughes receiver and a small TV I use outside with me to do the fine-tuning. The reason I like this receiver is that instead of having to manually switch transponders, it just runs all the ones at each slot and so I can do a relative comparison with a minimum of remote fuss. Very rarely do I muck with elevation to attempt and peak for even more signal, unless the signal levels are just too low and I know I can do better (granted, I'm using the same receiver in the same general area so I can get away with that kind of assessment).

    If I was doing this a LOT, then I'd invest in a meter, but lately my best investment has been the T&B Snap'N'Seal connectors and a Sargent 9800 crimper.
     
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