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Netflix's Internet traffic overtakes Web surfing

Discussion in 'Internet Streaming Services' started by Chris Blount, May 17, 2011.

  1. Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Netflix's Internet traffic overtakes Web surfing

    By PETER SVENSSON
    AP Technology Writer

    NEW YORK (AP) -- Move over, Web surfing. Netflix movies now take up more of the Internet pipes going into North American homes.

    A study published Tuesday by Sandvine Inc. shows that Netflix movies and TV shows account for nearly 30 percent of traffic into homes during peak evening hours, compared with less than 17 percent for Web browsing.

    Only about a quarter of homes with broadband subscribe to Netflix, but watching movies and TV shows online takes up a lot of bandwidth compared with Web surfing, email and practically every other Internet activity except file sharing and videoconferencing.

    More here.
     
  2. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Impressive stat, but how long before Netflix becomes the 600 pound gorilla?

    If there is a coming bandwidth crunch, as some say, Netflix may well take the brunt of the expected criticism. Hi-speed fiber, of course, is the solution, but no thanks to Verizon and ATT, the USA is a decade or more behind Europe in getting ftth.

    Greed, over need.
     
  3. Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Agreed. I see one of two things happening. Bandwidth caps for all providers, or Netflix will need to pay a "tax" for the extra bandwidth it uses.
     
  4. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Gold Members DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I just read an article about this topic (was going to post it here) that added this stat:

    "BitTorrent and Youtube, the previous industry boogie men, account for 11% and 10% of all Internet traffic, respectively, meaning Netflix takes more tube-space than both of them combined."

    There are more & more boxes being sold every day for folks to access them too........
     
  5. KMA001

    KMA001 New Member

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    Sep 21, 2011
    Effect of web downloads and piracy
    Today's L.A.Times/Business 5/18/11 has an article by Marc Lifsher about Digital Piracy. He quotes the Recording Industry Assn. of America, "net sales of CD fell 82% in the last decade" and a drop of sales and rentals of movies 19% in the last year alone. The RIAA has become desperate partly because they still cling to the old (ton of middle men) record label business model. It's been well reported that Netflex et, al has damaged what remains of the movie house business model and they are heading the same way as the disk because the movie studios don't feel like waiting for the big bucks while the domestic movie house (and pirates) use up their xx-day release lead over Netflex.
    So as a content delivery vehicle the old platter/disk and movie house is just about dead. Not to worry free enterprise is flourishing. Hackers are working days cracking Directv and Dish smart cards while working nights on cracking Netflex, iTunes, Amazon and Walmart downloads so they can sell digital bypass methods via Facebook.
    Another digital factor is that American Idol has shown how easy it is for some kid to perform a tune on Wednesday and have three million $1.30 Apple iTunes Internet downloads by Friday. A process that completely makes RIAA middlemen moot. Same for a "garage band". With available software an Apple laptop can lay down a very good eight track recording. The band tells everyone about it via Twitter, claims copyrights and gets Apple/iTunes to make it available for a 30% cut of the sale price. No contract with a record label, no middle men and it might minimize the piracy issue. The artiste finally gets the bulk money. If no one buys it no big deal. No ones out any front money.

    The point of all this is that Netflex is neat and welcome. There seems to be no question however that (unless Qualcom can overcome it) there is not enough broadband right now for everyone to download a Netflix movie on a bad TV night. The other problem is that the latest wifi routers can't handle the Netflex broadband either so we still need to have the modem/router/sat receiver within HDMI cable distance of the TV.
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  6. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Reporting the demise of the DVD, premium movie packages, and the movie theater experience is a tad premature, don't you think? Although, as a confirmed Netflix sub, I no longer buy DVDs, haven't been to a movie theater in over a year and expect to relinquish my cable preemies any day now. But I don't expect everyone to be as far ahead of the curve as is this 72 year old. ;)
     

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