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Network help

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by sideswipe, Feb 26, 2010.

  1. sideswipe

    sideswipe Legend

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    Dec 4, 2008
    so I finally got my notebook in & wanna set the network up, now I can setup network via: modem -> router, but I've had issues with random drops in online games using this method before, so im trying to install a switch in between.

    I've used the setup modem -> switch -> 2 pc's before with no issues no drops are anything.

    So now im trying to setup: modem -> switch -> pc/router.
    The router isnt detecting the modem via the switch. Any input where i can keep the switch inplace would be welcome.

    Modem is standard cable modem

    Router is: belkin

    Switch is: trendnet

    thanks for any input
     
  2. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

    6,259
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    Jun 6, 2009
    Well, first off, you should have:

    Modem >> Router >> PC(s)

    The switch would only be needed if you have more PCs than the router has available ports. I haven't looked at your links, but most retail routers have 1 WAN Input (from the modem) and 4 or 5 LAN outputs plus a wireless radio. You may need a Crossover cable between the modem and the router's WAN port but most newer routers detect and correct for that.

    As far as the drops, how are you defining those? Loss of signal requiring a reset? Or momentary drops that clear themselves? See your router's manual for a possible 'Gaming' setup or option.


    It's easiest in most cases to set everything for DHCP (see the manuals for the modem and router), but you may need the IP address, Gateway and DNS Server numbers from your cable company.
     
  3. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Northern VA
    And a lot of issues with drops/latency in gaming can be correcting by using port forwarding correctly depending on what ports the gaming site is using.

    - Merg
     
  4. Marlin Guy

    Marlin Guy Hall Of Fame

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    Apr 8, 2009
    If that's accurate, then your modem has routing function built-in. many modern cable/DSL modems do. If that is indeed the case, then you really don't need to install another router in the series to further complicate things for you.
    Unfortunately, you did not list the make/model of the modem.

    Assuming the modem does indeed have a built-in router and most likely a DHCP server as well, here are some alternatives to simplify things and avoid conflicts.

    Option 1. Replace the wireless router with a wireless access point, allowing the cable modem (with router) to handle routing and DHCP.

    Option 2. Turn off DHCP server on the cable modem.

    Option 3. Turn off DHCP server on the router to avoid conflicts.

    Option 4. Replace the wireless router with a wireless access point.

    Beyond those options, there are also some best practices to follow.

    Make sure that the modem and the router are in the same subnet.
    For example, set both to 192.168.1.XXX.
    Make sure that the wireless router's IP isn't in the pool of addresses being issued by another DHCP server, like the one on the modem.

    Post you modem make and model if you want more details.
     
  5. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    Jan 10, 2007
    Some edits on MGs post....

    -Option 1 can be accomplished by turning your Wireless Router into just a Wireless AP. Easy to do, just disable its DHCP and plug it into the modem via one of the LAN ports (not the internet or WAN port).

    -Option 2 is not really a good way to do it in any case. What the proper option there would be is to put the modem into bridge mode (which disables the router portion of it). This varies depending on the modem and is the best option for setups with a Modem/Router combo connecting to another Wireless Router. Just disabling DHCP does not disable the Router portion of the Modem/Router.

    -Option 3 is the same as my modified version of Option 1, you need to also plug it in via one of the LAN ports as well as turn off the DHCP server on the Wireless Router.

    -Option 4 is again the same thing really as options 1/3, but an option never the less if you want to go and buy another piece of hardware.

    All of these assume you have a Modem/Router combo which in general most Cable modems are not (though some are).
     
  6. Marlin Guy

    Marlin Guy Hall Of Fame

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    Oops.
    1 and 4 were the same.
    What I meant to list for #4 was to setup the existing router as an AP, as described above.
     
  7. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Jun 6, 2009
    I didn't think about the modem having a router built in. Some DSL modems have the router, 4 LAN ports and a wireless function built-in, but I'm not sure about cable modems.
     
  8. Marlin Guy

    Marlin Guy Hall Of Fame

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    I've seen many modems with just one Ethernet port that still perform routing functions with DHCP, etc.
    These days, looks can be deceiving.
     
  9. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    Jan 10, 2007
    Very much so, a ton of DSL modems have built in routers and a lot just have one ethernet jack and look like a regular straight modem :)
     
  10. sideswipe

    sideswipe Legend

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    Dec 4, 2008
    will check on what you guys have said so far & will report back after test a few options

    this is on Suddenlink internet, its telephony modem, make Arris Model TM502G, here is link to pdf on specs

    also did check the addresses, set @ 192.168.2.2 (other is 2.1)
     
  11. sideswipe

    sideswipe Legend

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    Dec 4, 2008
    also by chance did come across this in the router settings:

    The DMZ feature allows you to specify one computer on your network to be placed outside of the NAT firewall. This may be necessary if the NAT feature is causing problems with an application such as a game or video conferencing application. Use this feature on a temporary basis.The computer in the DMZ is not protected from hacker attacks.To put a computer in the DMZ, enter the last digits of its IP address in the field below and select "Enable". Click"Apply Changes"for the change to take effect.More Info

    the belkin website is not helpful towards gaming other than to make sure the submasks are similar. would you guys recommend using this & just relying on the firewall on the pc?
     
  12. Marlin Guy

    Marlin Guy Hall Of Fame

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    From what I could garner, there is no routing function on that modem.
    I'd be interested to see how you managed to have two PC's connected via a network switch like that.
     
  13. sideswipe

    sideswipe Legend

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    Dec 4, 2008
    the switch was simple just plug & go 2 desktops hardwired, originally the router was for the Wii but now that have the laptop also need 2 run it 24/7 if possible.
     
  14. houskamp

    houskamp New Member

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    yep from what I see on a quick google search that modem is for one computer (IP) connection.. you need to put a router behind it to connect more than one computer to it..
     
  15. sideswipe

    sideswipe Legend

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    Dec 4, 2008
    well the switch has port 1 & 5 that you connect the modem to, then it will split connections to other pcs, been in game for over 3hrs & no drops, disabling the DMZ on this pc only must have fixed the random drops i was getting

    update: over 6hrs no issues, DMZ seemed to be my issue. thanks for the help guys.
     
  16. Marlin Guy

    Marlin Guy Hall Of Fame

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    I know how a switch works. I'm just intrigued as to how you're getting IP settings from a device that typically doesn't have a pool from which to issue them or the means to do so.
     
  17. Grentz

    Grentz New Member

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    He is getting a Public IP on the internal device. The question is how he is getting multiple Public IPs unless he pays for them as internet connections only come provisioned for one public IP unless you pay extra (in almost all cases).

    Also if running a computer directly off of a modem like that with a public IP, make sure you have some very good security software as you are wide open for attack as the machine is directly on the internet wide open. Routers provide a lot of security through NAT alone.
     

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