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New house...6+ TV's, help with setup!

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by nikkidan, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. nikkidan

    nikkidan New Member

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    Nov 26, 2011
    We are building a new home, and will have at least 6 TV's. 3 TV's upstairs, and 3+ on the main floor. I've been told I can have 3 duo receivers. That means with one of the receivers I will need to change the channel with the remote on one floor, while the receiver is on another floor...will this work well?

    So does this mean too,that if Rcvr #1 is hooked up to TV #1 and #2, that I can only watch what is DVR'd on Rcvr #1, on Tv's 1 and 2? Would be nice to be able to be able to watch the DVR"d programs from all receivers on all TV's. Is this possible?

    I'm just really having a hard time trying to decide which TV's to pair up on the duo receivers.

    Is it possible to have more than 2 tv's on a duo receiver? But would that mean that we'd have to watch the same channel on more than one of those TV's?

    BTW...I'm really not wanting to spend a TON of money to get things working the way I would like/need...I'd just like to lease a few receivers if needed. I guess if we have to put money into it, thats ok, but not a bunch! I'm willing to sacrifice to save money too if needed. I'd like to know though what is possible for my situation. We are currently Dish Network customers, and planning to do dish mover for our service.
    If anyone has any suggestions or info for me I would sure appreciate it! I've just never had to worry about having more than 2 TV's and 1 duo receiver. Thank you.
     
  2. retiredTech

    retiredTech Icon

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    Oct 27, 2003
    How many veiwers are going to be in this new house?
    Do you need independant viewing on each of the six tvs?
    If not than you can save a lot of receiver fees.
    1 duo receiver "can" run 6 tvs if you don't need more than 2 different views.
    It all depends on your needs vs the cost per month.

    Yes the rf remote 2 works through walls/floors pretty well.( you can also enhance the rf remote by extending the small antenna on the receiver with coax)

    by using only 1 duo receiver on all tvs, you can watch any dvr program on any tv.
     
  3. jsk

    jsk Icon

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    Fallston, MD
    The remotes are UHF and will work through walls. If there are any problems with using the remotes in other rooms there are ways of getting it to work by using your home distribution coax wiring.

    You could plug all of your receivers into your home distribution wiring and that way, you could watch the content from any TV. Just make sure the RF channels are one channel apart from each other (i.e. Recv. 1 TV1 = ch. 52; TV2=54, Recv. 2 TV1 = ch. 56, TV2=58, Recv. 3 TV1=60, TV2=62). You would have to use the correct remote for the receiver that you want to watch.

    However, everything going through your home distribution coax will be in SD.
     
  4. MrDave

    MrDave Cool Member

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    Jun 26, 2010
    Since you're designing a system from scratch, let me suggest some approaches that have served me well over the years.

    When I installed my first Dish system 15 years ago I put 2 state-of-the-art model 5000s in a single cabinet. Even then, I decided that each of the 6 or so TVs in the house should be able to see each of the receivers. My equipment has changed a lot over time, but never my basic philosophy. Today, the same cabinet holds 2 622s and each 622 is easily viewable on any of 4 HDTVs or 2 SDTVs throughout the house.

    Think of each DuoDVR receiver simply as a signal source. In single mode, it outputs a single program thru numerous connectors, both HD and SD. Splitting the SD output is easy using simple coax splitters or coax distribution amps. Send SD over coax anywhere in the house to drive any reasonable number of SDTVs.

    Surprisingly, the HDTV distribution isn't that much harder. I've had excellent luck splitting the HDMI from each of my 622s. Each 622 is hooked to a Monoprice 4-way powered HDMI splitter and drives 4 HDTVs thru cables of 12ft, 25ft, 50ft and 50ft. 8-way HDMI splitters are also available, as well as splitters that serve CAT6 for longer cable runs.

    If you can physically route the HDMI cables and deal with distances you can make each DuoDVR box serve some or all of the TVs in the house. The key to this system is that each DuoDVR runs in single mode... much less confusing.

    Think of it this way:
    1.The number of DVRs you need may be determined by the number of users who need to watch different programs at the same time. PERIOD. It may have nothing to do with the number of TVs in the house.
    2. You'll need remotes, easily available on eBay. You can use 6.0 thru 6.4 remotes interchangably (assuming you remain on default band A). Buy them in bulk if possible and label or color code them with tape when you have more than one system available at any given TV. 5.n remotes work ok, but are IR only. Remotes don't care about TV1/TV2 when the DVR is in single mode. All remotes simply run "the box".
    3. If you dislike long HDMI cables because of flexibility issues, Port Savers (Monoprice item 2891) are your friend.

    I hope you find some of these ideas useful.
     
  5. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    +1 with MrDave - when I first started with Dish, we had a single 4700 receiver. We got a Sony version of this

    http://www.smarthome.com/7717/Channel-Plus-3025-Multi-Room-Video-Distribution-System/p.aspx

    and then this exact box when the Sony crapped out. The Channelplus is still going strong, and I've supplemented this with an additional distribution amp for additional tuners as well. I also distribute OTA signals and some other RF sources through this. It all works very nicely. We also have some IR targets for remote TVs / emitters for the sources.

    Admittedly, the RF is strictly SD, but since our only HD is OTA, it works well for us. If I get around to needing HD distribution, I'll check into those powered HDMI splitters.
     
  6. boba

    boba Hall Of Fame

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    Each dual tuner DVR adds $17 to your account so 3 total DVRs is going to add $34 every month to your bill plus $6 DVR fee plus the programming package. Think about some of the suggestions you have been given.
     
  7. tampa8

    tampa8 Godfather/Supporter

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    I have done similar to what MR Dave is saying. One of my 612's has a powered HDMI splitter on it, it goes to the Audio/Visual receiver then to the TV. (It could go directly to the TV) and it also goes to my HD Slingbox. (It could go to a second TV) I use the slingbox often and in many ways. While only channel can watched at at time, I have more options.

    My second 612 also has a powered HDMI splitter, it goes to the TV it is near upstairs, AND to the Audio/Visual receiver, which goes to the first TV. (It could go directly to a second HDMI input on the TV). Using the UHF remote, that first TV is then connected to two 612's, HD.
    In addition to that, I do have a coax from the second 612 going to the room where my wife does light work outs in the morning, and she can watch on the SD tv we have in there. I could of course go farther with more TV hookups, but you get the idea.
    I guess it most depends on how many TV's have to be watching different programs at the same time. If you had a 722K in place of the 612 for instance, that would allow two different TV's to watch two different programs, though one would be in SD.
     
  8. Kevin F

    Kevin F Hall Of Fame

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    I understand this is a Dish forum but with 6 TVs DirecTV may be a goo option. Especially that you mentioned you wanted a whole home DVR setup.

    Kevin
     
  9. Dec 2, 2011 #9 of 26
    nikkidan

    nikkidan New Member

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    Nov 26, 2011
    Wow...Thanks! It all doesn't make sense to me (a little bit)...but lots of info I can forward on so it all gets hooked up right. I'd like to do what I need to do to be able to watch DVR's programs on all the TV's.

    Most of the time there would be 2 TV's going...4 at the most at one time, maybe occasionally 5. I'll be caling Dish Network next week to get it all figured out. I wonder if Dish will be doing the wiring of the coax in the house, or will my electrician?
     
  10. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    You will want your electrician to do it. Actually my builder had a different company do all the low voltage work. You will want a minimum of two coax and one cat-6 to each TV location. Much cheaper to run all this stuff before the sheet-rock goes on. If you really want to run HDMI or component video cables between rooms you will need that done as well.
     
  11. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    One coax will suffice. No need to get crazy.
     
  12. nikkidan

    nikkidan New Member

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    Nov 26, 2011
    We are building on a slab foundation. So we need to have everything we will need in the walls done now. Anything that would need to be done later, would be alot of work since there is no basement.
     
  13. FarmerBob

    FarmerBob Godfather

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    When I first got DISH in 1994, we had 8 TV's and DISH only did one box, one TV. I put 4 receivers in the basement (still have every box we have ever had) and installed a modulator system that we still use today. The UHF remotes are a god send. Everybody has their own remote and can take them to any TV in or around the house. Originally I used our copper pipe hot water heating system as the UHF antenna, I could easily change channels from the neighbors house or the backyard where we have two sets. But after about 5-6 years it stopped being effective. So I switched over to our old RG-59 system that puts the same antennas that are on the backs of the receivers right in the middle of each quadrant of the house. Mixed with the Modulator output off the new receivers into the main distribution buss, now we have 12 custom channels plus all local OTA available to 18 outlets, 9 sets at the moment. I figured that when the conversion came along I'd have to get an HD Mod system. But much to my surprise as we added HDTV's and set them to Auto Picture Mode they show the fare in unadulterated 16:9. If set to normal the picture is squished into a 4:3 format with everything long and tall. So when left on auto it's 16:9 and beautiful. The large sets also have direct feeds via HDoF (HD over Fiber).

    One thing I have noticed is that the audio over the receiver modulators in muffled on TV2 more so on TV1.

    Every time DirecTV shows their "whole house" product
    Grandma says, "We've had that since the old days".
     
  14. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    Disagree, with new construction it is silly not to. For a 622 or 722 you might actually want three. One for input from the satellite, one for OTA and one for the Home Distribution output. Yes some of those can be combined with diplexers but why if you don't have to?
     
  15. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    Diplexers are cheaper than coax.
     
  16. FarmerBob

    FarmerBob Godfather

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    Diplexers are great. I use one to combine OTA Antenna on the roof and one feed from the DPP44. Would use more but all the receiver runs are direct and only need one OTA line to the distribution buss. Although, you can not combine the UHF Remote Antenna feed with any of the RF to TV or OTA lines. That's why I used the old RG-59 lines for the Remote Antennas. The remote IR senors, don't use any, that go with my distribution system use the same technology to send IR back to the buss and equipment racks.

    In installs I use a bundled cable that has 2 Coax, 2 Fiber, 2 Cat6, minimum. Sometimes we need to run two cables to each location. But then there are many other combinations to be had.
     
  17. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    You CAN mix the dish UHF remote antennas with the Dish signal (from the LNB) - it's when you put the OTA in there as well that the RF remote quits.
     
  18. FarmerBob

    FarmerBob Godfather

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    Sorry I wasn't clear. The point is that you can not mix the RF's, but can dish and one of the two RF's.
     
  19. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    I was just clarifying it - OTA will kill the RF antenna remote, but LNB signal is fine.
     
  20. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salem, OR
    Conduit (PVC) is your friend. I'd suggest 1-1/2" and that it be independent of any electricity runs.

    Conduit has served me better than all of the advanced planning I've undertaken.
     

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