1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

New install, trying to get some ideas

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by kevinwill1, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. kevinwill1

    kevinwill1 Cool Member

    15
    0
    Jun 12, 2009
    Hello, everyone...

    I have DirecTV coming in a couple of weeks for a new install, and I have questions I wanted to ask. I've searched for what I am looking for, but can't find the answers I was needing. Perhaps I wasn't using the correct terms, so please forgive me.

    Firstly, I live in a rental townhome community, that is especially peculiar about how installs for things like DirecTV are done. I know where I want to put the dish, but my concern is how to get the cable from the dish into the house. Where the dish is going to go is on the back of the house, right off the patio. I was thinking the best place to have the cable come through is the back bedroom window, and then up into the attic. Is there such thing as a flat cable (similar to flat Ethernet cable) that could be used in this manner?

    I'm not even sure what the cable that comes from the dish looks like or how big it is, so I don't know if the installer would be willing to go with my idea or not, or if thise would even work. Is there anything I could/should do on my own before the installer comes, to help facilitate a successful installation?

    Thanks in advance, and any and all advice or suggestion would be greatly appreciated. I hope everyone is having a good day.
    KEVIN W
     
  2. Manctech

    Manctech Icon

    542
    0
    Jul 5, 2010
    First off, welcome to the forums. Next i'll try to answer all of your questions.

    The type of cable run from the dish is RG6. The number of cables needed depends on what equipment you ordered. If you ordered an HD or HD-DVR then most likely only one cable will be needed.

    As for flat cable, yes we do have it but it is unlikely that it would be used to run inside your window and then to the attic. Typically it used to run from multi-switch/splitter to receiver.

    If your townhouse is pre-wired the cables should find their way outside but the isn't always the case.

    To better answer your questions it'll help to know about the townhouse. Is it multiple floors? How many receivers did you order and what kind? Does the townhouse have a crawlspace?

    Hope this helps.

    - James - Sent from my handheld
     
  3. kevinwill1

    kevinwill1 Cool Member

    15
    0
    Jun 12, 2009
    Hi, James. Thanks for the info. As to the answers to your questions...

    I have a two story house, and it does have a crawlspace. We are pre-wired for cable, but it runs through the attics of all the houses (my community is several townhouses joined together side-by-side) to the end of the whole building, where the central junction is (I think), and split off through the attic and crawlspace to reach the TVs in our house. Hopefully this won't be a hindrance. There are 4 other neighbors that have DirecTV, so I'm hoping it won't be a big deal. I only ordered 2 receives, but one is the Whole Home DVR, and the other is the standard HD receiver (non-DVR).

    Hopefully this will help you further.

    KEVIN W
     
  4. Manctech

    Manctech Icon

    542
    0
    Jul 5, 2010
    It does help. If the receiver is on the first floor the best way is into the crawlspace and either up through the floor behind the tv or down through the wall into the crawlspace. Down through the wall is considered a crawlfish and some companies/techs charge for it. It is considered the same as a wall fish which is ''custom labor''. If it is on the second floor then the best way into the attic is up behind a gutter into the gable.

    Optimally the best way is to run from the dish to the junction outside. Depending on the location and how far it is from the dish will determine if that is even an option.

    A good idea would be to check out your neighbors rigg if they don't mind you snooping.

    Most likely how theirs is installed will be similar to how yours will. This may vary depending on what equipment they have of course. You may see some with 2 or 4 lines. Your setup will only require 1.

    Lastly, the dish will need to be bonded to a ground source. The bestplace is the utility meter. If that is near the cable junction then near there will be the best place to put the dish. There are alternates to the utility but not many.

    I hope this helps answer some questions.

    Some good advice to prepare for the technicians arrival would be to have the tv's pulled out so that the outlets are easily accesible. Also I see you are in Nc, so having a cold bottle of water to offer the tech is always greatly appreciated. Especially if he is going to be in the attic which can easily reach 100+.

    If you have anymore questions let me know. Customer just got home for his 4-8 service call. But I'll reply when I get home after.

    - James - Sent from my handheld.
     
  5. kevinwill1

    kevinwill1 Cool Member

    15
    0
    Jun 12, 2009
    Thanks again for the response, James.

    The junction is at the far end of the complex, approximately 160 feet away, so I doubt the installer will bother with going that route. I sure wouldn't want to. My neighbors aren't home yet, but I walked by the dish setups for all of them. Three of the four neighbors have the cable from the dish going into the house via their back bedroom windows, or through the door on the back of the house (which I can't imagine them doing, with my thoughts of cable strung loosely throughout the house, but who knows how it is actually done inside). The other neighbor actually lives on the very end of the complex, and has the cable from the dish apparently going into the junction box. There is a very low hanging tree on that side of the complex, so there is no line-of-sight right there. All four of the neighbors actually have the dish mounted near the air conditioning units for their homes, which are placed directly ontop of the outdoor mini-storage rooms that all of us have, right beside the back bedroom windows. But none of them are near the utility meter. Could the A/C units assist with grounding?

    My intent was to put the main receiver (Whole Home DVR) on the 1st floor and have the 2nd one in the front bedroom upstairs. The crawlspace really isn't readily accessible, except through the attic, where you can see down directly into it, or through an access panel in the downstairs bathroom. (Side note, whomever designed these houses was obviously not thinking all that well, or ran out of money, or was bored, or something...)

    My idea was to run the cable from the dish into the back bedroom window, and then have it go up through the inside of the back bedroom closet, into the attic. From there, I was going to have the cable run down into the front bedroom for the 2nd receiver, and then down into the crawlspace for the Main Receiver. I obviously don't know very much about the whole process, but it's sounding like I might be having to deal with a custom install. :nono:
    Should I even bother with it at this point? I'm sick of Time Warner Cable!

    KEVIN W
     
  6. Manctech

    Manctech Icon

    542
    0
    Jul 5, 2010
    You pretty much nailed it. Flat cable in the windows seems like your only option. It's not the optimal setup but it sounds like some pretty strict restrictions on what can and can't be done. As long as the tech does it right, then it shouldn't look too bad.

    Whatever you do, don't cancel. Every tech is different and there might be no custom charges or may not even charge you for them. Either way, he might have other options. The tech will be able to fill you in on what your options are. It's hard to say without physically being there. Good luck! Gotta run! Dinner with the in-laws.

    - James
     
  7. satguy22

    satguy22 Legend

    120
    0
    Oct 1, 2006
    You need a letter from your landlord or dtv cant install anything. It has to tell dtv what the rules of you housing unit and have thier letter head.
     
  8. kevinwill1

    kevinwill1 Cool Member

    15
    0
    Jun 12, 2009
    Thanks again, James. I really appreciate the insight. With the flat cable, is that something the installer would have with them as a "just in case", or would I need to call DirecTV and see if they could add this to the order to bring one, or could I/should I just buy my own?

    KEVIN W
     
  9. kevinwill1

    kevinwill1 Cool Member

    15
    0
    Jun 12, 2009
    Hi, satguy...

    I knew about having to get permission from the housing community beforehand, but thanks for the reminder. DirecTV told me there was some kind of form available through their website that I could download and print, and get a signature to give to the installer. Does anyone know where I could find this right off hand? Property letterhead would be no biggie, either. I just like knowing all my options beforehand!

    KEVIN W
     
  10. Manctech

    Manctech Icon

    542
    0
    Jul 5, 2010

    http://www.directv.com/see/pdf/installationpermissionform.pdf
     
  11. Manctech

    Manctech Icon

    542
    0
    Jul 5, 2010
    Any professional installer should have flat cables on them. It's standard on most apartments/rentals. Also, it needs to be high frequency flat cable. Don't let a tech just feed coax through the window and smash it down. (seen it a lot)
     

Share This Page