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New to HD and RVU

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by WalkGood, Sep 28, 2013.

  1. WalkGood

    WalkGood Cool Member

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    I am a newbie with HD and RVU. Presently I have SD DVR - been with DirecTV since 1997.

    I just bought a flat screen Samsung series 6, UN55F6350A. Had no idea it could be a "client" for a DireccTV whole-house/Genie setup. Found out by starting to read on this forum.

    Anyway, is there a "primer" of sorts that explains the whole scenario?


    Also, what are the additional DirecTV chargers of having a TV as an RVU client (is that the way to properly say this?)

    Presently I have the Premiere package, with one SD DVR R15/500 and one wonky HDVR2 TiVO unit. I own the receivers. Monthly I pay the following:

    What will I be charged monthly to just add an HD DVR receiver? Right now the receiver is free from DirecTV.

    What will be charged monthly to have the Genie system? And to add my TV as an RVU client?

    Will I still NOT be charged the "Advanced Receiver" $10.00/month fee ? What if I add the new HD DVR receiver and drop the old HDVR2 receiver (it often locks up and won't restart). I'd only want to keep it active if I can get some TiVo'd recordings off of it that I cannot find anymore (discontinued kids show); then I'd drop it.


    Thanks for any help!
     
  2. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    First, welcome. Your Sammy appears to be the same model I bought earlier this year. Nice looking picture. Especially in HD.

    Unless there is something else going on with your account, DirecTV would probably upgrade you to a Genie w/o any issues. They want you under contract for two more years. Probably for free -- premium subscriber, equipment older than most.

    The Genie itself doesn't have any fees, but you have to add on the $10 per month HD service and the $3 per month MRV (multi-room viewing). Both of these fees are per account, not per DVR. New customers get hit with a $25 per month Advance Receiver Fee that includes DVR, HD and MRV.

    The Genie requires SWM (single wire). One coax per DVR instead of two (and certainly not five for the Genie). So your LNB on your dish will probably be replaced (free). If you have more than eight tuners (Genie has 5; DVRs have 2, Receivers 1 and Genie-client/RVU 0), they run four wires from the dish to a SWM16 multi-switch and then one coax to each box.

    The Genie is going to be super-fast to operate when compared to your current equipment.

    The first TV is $6 per month, but you get that 'back' with a credit; $6 for each TV after that. I forgot whether you pay the same $6 for the RVU.

    I'd rather have a DVR or HD receiver than RVU. The RVU, like a Genie client (mini-Genie), use the tuners from the Genie. If the Genie dies, you have no TV in your house (other than OTA).

    Read some more around here. Know what you want before you call DirecTV (I have always gotten better deals with a live person than when I went online to upgrade equipment). If the CSR you're talking with is offering you everything a full price, you'll want to thank them for their help and tell them you have to check with your spouse.

    Good luck and again, welcome.
     
  3. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    There is a $6 monthly whether you use the Samsung client or a C31/41 Genie client. With the upgrade D will probably give you the client boxes for free.

    Once you add a client on your account and get a Genie, you can experiment with your Samsung as a client. Get an RC71 remote control (comes with Genie HR44 or C41) and enter 54000 for code.

    The only advantage is not using an HDMI port on your TV and not having the small CX1 client box / power consumption.

    I got a Sony that has the client and tried it briefly back in May. I agree with TRH above, I'd rather have another HR2x DVR for more space and backup recordings.
     
  4. WalkGood

    WalkGood Cool Member

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    Nov 18, 2006
    If I use the Samsung RVU then I assume that I should put the Genie box itself in the same room as the other TV? Which is NOT an HD TV so maybe a Genie is not for us right now. Although it does sound pretty cool with all it's features. With just two TVs how is the wiring? From dish to Genie first? Is there an output from the Genie that is viewable on an SD crt TV? Then what type (coax? HDMI?) and how many wires are run to the Samsung RVU from the Genie?


    So if u have a Genie and one client box, then the Samsung as a client just works as a (free?) bonus?

    How did u try your Sony "briefly" as a client? Did you cancel the Genie and send it back, reverting to an HD DVR?


    Thanks for the replies!
     
  5. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    Sounds like your new HD TV is your primary TV.

    So I'd put the Genie at that location and then another receiver/DVR/mini-Genie at your CRT TV. I wouldn't use the RVU on that TV.

    With MRV, there isn't a direct wire from the Genie to the client or RVU TV. It uses the coax that I assume you already have.
     
  6. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, I had a Genie client for a few months and got the Sony that had RVU client. But I also had a Genie on that TV so I just tried the RVU client to compare.

    I later cancelled the genie client and kept my DVRs.

    The Genie clients are networked via the coax and your TV can have an Ethernet connection on the same network or if coax is handy use a powered DECA to extend the network to the TV.
     
  7. WalkGood

    WalkGood Cool Member

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    Seems that I need a pro & con list of getting a Genie setup versus just adding an HD DVR. Online I can get the HD DVR for free, a big PLUS in PRO column since we just bought the Samsung flat screen.

    The Genie and RVU on my new Samsung tv sounds slick, but if it really isn't worth it then the regular non-genie HD DVR setup will win out.


    Don't know if this makes a difference, but my broadband is DSL, 3.0 Mbps. The router/firewall has WiFi which I use for laptops. I will probably Ethernet hard-wire the tv and whatever new HD box I get, for their internet access.
     
  8. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    I recommend you call. Typically a big difference between the two. Especially with your plan and 'old' equipment (assuming you have a good payment history with DirecTV). I was still under contract in July when I added a Genie, Genie-client (long story), NFL Sunday ticket and the installation, all for $99.00. I just had some upgraded equipment last year, so I was surprised to get that deal.

    Others have reported getting a Genie for free.

    Prior to April, I was running my MRV with six DirecTV boxes (5 DVRs and one receiver), sometimes four computers, several iPads and four smartphones on Wifi. My AT&T DSL 3mbs was no worse than prior to the MRV. But the Genie does allow you to plug your Ethernet into it and use it as a bridge to your other DVR/Receiver/mini-Genie instead of the CCK I have installed.

    Based on the equipment pricing you can get from calling DirecTV, I'd still recommend a Genie for your new TV and another SWM-capable DVR for your other TV. If not, then an HD receiver (H25 is great).
     
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  9. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    It just depends on the upfront cost . . . over the years I accumulated 7 DVRs for not much upfront and just turned in a HR22-100 for no reason other than to try to slim down a little.

    Monthly cost of a genie client and a DVR is the same. (other than power consumption- a few watts different). But a DVR gives 500 gb more storage and doesn't use resources from the Genie.

    If the genie dies, you're toast.
     
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  10. WalkGood

    WalkGood Cool Member

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    Very good points for consideration, thank you.


    I am not quite sure what that means - I really need som ekind of "primer" that explains all of this! Any recommendations? Besides, "read all of this forum"! :) Thanks!
     
  11. studechip

    studechip Godfather

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    BTW, that Tivo isn't going to be supported by Directv much longer since it doesn't have an RID number.
     
  12. WalkGood

    WalkGood Cool Member

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    Yeah, I'd get rid of it except it has a bunch of kid shows that are not aired anymore and not on DVD or VHS. It's a "project" case right now, either has a bad power supply or the HDD has issues. It won't fully boot up anymore But that is a different discussion thread!
     
  13. Supramom2000

    Supramom2000 In Loving Memory of Onyx-2/23/09

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    Typically, Direct TV installers adding a Genie to someone's system will hook up what is called a "Cinema Connection Kit" that runs to your router via ethernet cable (or a wireless version is also available) and this allows all your receivers to access the internet and "apps" and Video on Demand, etc, via the coax connection to that CCK.

    With a Genie, you can bypass that CCK and place your Genie near your router so that an ethernet cable can be connected directly to the Genie. This acts as a "bridge" to the rest of your network and again, any other receiver can access the internet via that Genie bridge set up.
     
  14. DB Stalker

    DB Stalker New Member

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    If you CAN get the genie for free, then do it. I think the only pros and cons that need to be weighed are what type of box to get in the second TV.
    They won't likely give you a genie AND an HDDVR for free (it doesn't hurt to ask), but that would be the ideal setup. If they don't, the only pros and cons are whether to get a client or an HD box. With only 2 TVs, I would prefer the client. That way you've got access to VOD and Pandora.
    To answer your previous question, you can hook any HD box into any tv. Even grandma's old cabinet TV.
    #)
     
  15. peds48

    peds48 Genius. DBSTalk Club

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    To answer your previous question, you can hook any HD box into any tv. Even grandma's old cabinet TV*.
    #)
    *some accessories may be required


    Sent from my iPad using DBSTalk
     
  16. DB Stalker

    DB Stalker New Member

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    *some accessories may be required


    Sent from my iPad using DBSTalk
    True, but for most TVs composite cables are sufficient.

    #)
     

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