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noob question about DECA

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Connected Home' started by loucapo, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. loucapo

    loucapo New Member

    1
    0
    Mar 1, 2011
    OK I may sound really dumb here but I don't see any talk about this. It seems like I can use the DECA to extend my network to a PC with no Ethernet (at least I think it does). I cannot find how this is done. Is this in fact possible? If so, how?

    Thanks!

    PS Just got my HD DVR Setup yesterday.
     
  2. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

    10,289
    35
    Jun 24, 2007
    Northern VA
    :welcome_s to DBSTalk!

    While it can be done, it is not a supported setup by DirecTV. So, here's the little disclaimer ahead of time... If something goes wrong, DirecTV might not support you in trying to rectify the issue. Also, it can cause unpredictablity or issues with MRV and also your home network.

    That being said, what you would want to do is connect a Broadband DECA in the room that does not have an available ethernet connection with the PC. If you have more than one component to connect, then you would hook a small switch to the Broadband DECA and your devices to the switch.

    If there is only one coax in that room and it is currently being used by a receiver, you will need to either install a green label splitter (with one output going to the receiver and the other going to the Broadband DECA). Or, if the receiver is currently using a DECA (not an H24/HR24), you can place a switch between the DECA and the receiver and hook up your devices (to include the receiver) to the switch.

    HTH,
    Merg
     
  3. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

    37,060
    287
    Jun 18, 2006
    Yes, bottom line is it can be done. And I have done it. But it's the opposite of what you're supposed to do, and here's the reason. DECA is supposed to be separate from the rest of your network so it can deliver smooth video to your DVRs. If you add regular network traffic to that, you risk losing the smooth video.
     

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