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NPRM and grounding question...

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by ecrabb, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. ecrabb

    ecrabb Cool Member

    26
    0
    Aug 5, 2003
    Hi guys,

    I'm moving a 5LNB slimline from a temp ground mount to the roof of the garage along with a new OTA antenna. Including the drop from the roof, it'll probably be a 50-60' run from the new location to the point of entry on the house. I'm confused about what I should or shouldn't do with the ground.

    I was thinking that where the run drops off the roof of the garage, I'd put in a new grounding rod, and run a #10 from the antenna and dish. From there, I'd bond the rod and the house's main ground with a 30' piece of #6 so I wouldn't have a floating ground. Is that OK?

    The point of entry is right next to the house ground rod, so I can ground the ground blocks right there with a short piece of #10.

    I didn't think I'd even need the new ground rod, but I read somewhere here that the NEC says 25 feet max for a #10 ground, and I'll be at 50 or 60.

    Am I on the right track?

    Also, any ideas for a cheap DIY mat to put the two FRM200's on? I was going to order them from Solid Signal, but the price w/shipping was silly. A scrap of EPDM would work perfectly, but I have no idea where I'd get some. A commercial roofing contractor, perhaps?

    Thanks!
    SC
     

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  2. ecrabb

    ecrabb Cool Member

    26
    0
    Aug 5, 2003
    Wow, 70 views and not a single comment? Let's try this again, only simpler...

    Given that I have a 60' run from dish/antenna to point of entry and main ground,

    Do I:
    1) Run heavy ground all the way from the roof to the main ground, or do I...
    2) Add new ground rod where I come off the roof and bond the two together

    Thanks,
    SC
     
  3. BattleScott

    BattleScott Hall Of Fame

    2,353
    7
    Aug 28, 2006
    The ground block at the point of entry to the house would be the simplest and probably the best solution. A single ground point is always preferrable and would be far less work than adding an additional ground rod and bonding the grounds.
     
  4. Bill C

    Bill C Mentor

    38
    0
    Aug 22, 2006
    I would run dual rg-6 with #17 ground attached from dish to ground block on house by main ground (ground block no more than 20 feet away). #17
    ground wire that is attached to dual rg-6 to be bonded at dish foot at one
    end and the ground block at other end. Run #10 ground wire from groun d block
    to main ground at house.
     
  5. David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

    5,689
    0
    Jan 29, 2008
    simple answer, ask your local code enforcement officer about requirements. depending on town size he/she may be able to give personal attention.
     
  6. ecrabb

    ecrabb Cool Member

    26
    0
    Aug 5, 2003
    And less expensive, too!

    Bill - Thanks, that's a another idea I hadn't considered.

    Dave, I was trying to avoid that as it's nearly impossible to interact with the code guys, here. They're so busy, it takes days just to get a call back. A good idea nevertheless.

    Any cheap matt ideas?

    Thanks, guys!

    SC
     

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