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Observation of people on Internet apologizing for language skills

Discussion in 'The OT' started by dpeters11, May 16, 2012.

  1. May 20, 2012 #61 of 118
    Rich

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    Huh. Never heard that one.

    Rich
     
  2. May 20, 2012 #62 of 118
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    I often pronounce often, often.
     
  3. May 20, 2012 #63 of 118
    Rich

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    From what I read before, the t was pronounced and then was left out. But I only read what a few sites had on them. I Googled "pronunciation of often" and got a lot of hits.

    Rich
     
  4. May 20, 2012 #64 of 118
    Rich

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    Ever notice how the new posters come around to writing properly after they've posted a few times?

    Rich
     
  5. May 20, 2012 #65 of 118
    Rich

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    "Axed" and "ast" seem to be synonymous with "asked" on TV shows.

    Rich
     
  6. May 20, 2012 #66 of 118
    Rich

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    OK, here's what drives me nutz: People that start, what seems like every sentence, with "OK". And they end the same sentence with "OK?" I don't think I've ever seen this in written form, but I've heard it many times in seminars and meetings. OK?

    Also "irregardless" being used as a word really annoys me. It's a double negative and "regardless" is the word that should be used.

    Rich
     
  7. May 20, 2012 #67 of 118
    TheRatPatrol

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    Sup? :D
     
  8. May 20, 2012 #68 of 118
    SayWhat?

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    Dude!!

    OK, like I get yer point ferr sure, OK?
     
  9. May 20, 2012 #69 of 118
    Herdfan

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    It went away when they tried to have the Miss Ebonics pageant. Nobody wanted to be Miss Idaho. :eek2:
     
  10. May 20, 2012 #70 of 118
    Rich

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    I think you mean S'up?.....:lol:

    Rich
     
  11. May 20, 2012 #71 of 118
    Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    Definite hot buttons for me: improper use of the personal pronouns, "I", "Me", "He", "Him", "She", "Her", "We", "Us", "They" and "Them". I cringe every time I hear my grandsons say "Me and Him went to the show."

    It also bugs me when a waitress addresses two or more people as "guys".
     
  12. May 20, 2012 #72 of 118
    Rich

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    Thanx, almost fell off the chair laughing.....:lol:

    Rich
     
  13. May 20, 2012 #73 of 118
    SayWhat?

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    'The girl was asked out' has a considerably different meaning than 'the girl was axed out'.

    If you get my drift.




    Maybe sometimes, but not nearly offen enough.
     
  14. May 20, 2012 #74 of 118
    Nick

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    Watch how many people, when being interviewed on tv or before a audience, will open with "Well, I mean, you know...", or a variation, thereof.
     
  15. May 20, 2012 #75 of 118
    AntAltMike

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    Actually, it should be written as 's'up, if it is a contraction of (what)s up. I'll leave it to others here to contemplate whether the "S" needs to be capitalized, as the first word of a sentence.
     
  16. May 20, 2012 #76 of 118
    AntAltMike

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    The incident I alluded to occurred before your son was born... and possibly before you were born
     
  17. May 20, 2012 #77 of 118
    dpeters11

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    It depends on who it is. If its someone not used to being on TV or being in front of an audience, their normal language skills can drop several levels just from being nervous.
     
  18. May 21, 2012 #78 of 118
    Nick

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    Okay, (OK, Ok?), it's important that we get this right. According to the yet-to-be-published Oxford English Book of Urban Style & Usage, the combined greeting and inquiry, "What's up?", is a derivation of the original "What's up, doc?", as spoken by that irascible and wascaly wabbit, Bugs Bunny of Looney Tunes and Merry Melodies fame.

    Just as water will always seek the lowest level, and electrons will take the path of least resistance, the American language, over time, will naturally seek the shortest distance from beginning to end, human nature being what it is.

    My father was a newspaperman and, as such, had to edit, shorten, condense and abbreviate copy to fit within the limited space of a headline or caption. While he may not have approved of the corruption of 'what's up' to 'sup', he most likely would have ok'd the virtually instantaneous transition of the term 'web log' to 'blog'.

    Going forward, look for the American language to deteriorate at an even faster pace than (not then) ever before due to a younger generation fully immersed in the bastardized language of texting, as well as the continued influence of immigrants and ethnicities on the American language.

    Lest anyone think this is a contemporary phenomenon, even the revered Wm. Shakespeare, in the English of his day, and with all of his verbal flourishes, was a master of the economical use of space on the page. Finally, I am reminded of the cryptic advertisement (ad) placards that emblazoned Washington, D.C. busses and streetcars of my yout, asking "Cn u rd ths?"

    At least we don't have to speak/write German.
     
  19. May 21, 2012 #79 of 118
    Rich

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    I wouldn't have capitalized it if it hadn't been originally capitalized in the post I referred to. There's a member with the user name of S'up. He lives across the river from me. I've never seen 's'up in print so I didn't consider it, but you're right or as right as you can be about something like this.....:lol:

    Rich
     
  20. May 21, 2012 #80 of 118
    Rich

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    Hmm, that son's 46 and it sure didn't happen before I was born....:lol:

    Rich
     

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