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On-Demand way too slow to be usable.

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Mike Greer, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. Feb 19, 2012 #1 of 178
    Mike Greer

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    What kinds of speeds are you all getting for so called 'On-Demand'? I've only used it a few times because of how long it takes to watch anything. I'm downloading a 30min HD On-Demand program and it has been downloading for about 90 minutes and is at 80%.

    I'm wondering if my complaint should be with Comcast? My Internet is pretty darn quick - I just did a few 'speed tests' (even while the DirecTV download continues) and I am getting about 35Mbps down and 20Mbps up. That's a good thing but maybe Comcast is throttling the connections to DirecTV? I wouldn't put it past them that's for sure!

    The way it stands now On-Demand for me is worthless.

    I'm using DECA and there is a DECA adapter about 4' from my SWM16 plugged directly into the Comcast cable modem.

    If these results are not typical I may try plugging my laptop into the DECA adapter on one of my HR22s and try the speed tests there....
     
  2. Feb 19, 2012 #2 of 178
    allenn

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    I have AT&T DSL, 3 Mbps, connected to a Linksys wireless "N" router which transmits to a wireless "N" gaming adapter and a wireless "G" bridge. I can download on-demand HD programs and movies, greater than 60 minutes, in less than 30 minutes. When I had a hard wired ethernet connection to the DVRs it was faster.

    I have heard that Comcast reduces download speeds for some media downloads. You may be experiencing the new bandwidth restrictions. Another possiblility is cable providers have shared bandwidth and your neighbors are all hitting the network at the same time. I'm no expert in these matters, but there are plenty of DBSTALK members who may shed light on your on-demand speed issue. Best wishes!
     
  3. Feb 19, 2012 #3 of 178
    veryoldschool

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    The limit is close to 7-8 Mb/s from their end, so even if you have a faster connection, it won't come any faster.
    ISPs have been known for "choking" DirecTV On Demand, since it may compete with their own service.
    HD with my 6 Mb/s varies from 1:1 to 1:1.5 [mins of programing verses download time], but checking the program bit rates has shown these are what vary, and my ISP isn't the choke point.
    "In most cases" you can buffer enough within a short time, to start watching a program, without running out of buffer, unless you have a slow connection, or your ISP is choking it.
    "On Demand", might better be called "on request", but it shouldn't take all that long.
     
  4. Feb 19, 2012 #4 of 178
    CCarncross

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    Just a small point, wired or wireless should make little to no difference for VOD stuff, if your wireless network is running well, even g speeds are usually faster than your connection to your internet provider...I have AT&T's 6Mb/sec DSL package, my wireless g at 54Mb/sec is way faster than my internet connection. Hard-wiring to my network would not speed up VOD downloads one bit because my wireless connection is not the bottleneck, my ISP connection is. Until you have an ISP giving you upwards of 36Mb/sec connection speeds and no content throttling, wireless g for VOD is all that is needed.
     
  5. Feb 19, 2012 #5 of 178
    Red Orc

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    It is not possible for your wireless connection to be 54MB per second if AT&T is only providing you with 8MB per second speed. I don't think AT&T even has internet speeds that fast. Your wireless migt be 54 megaBITS per second but I very seriously doubt if it 54 megaBYTES per second.
     
  6. Feb 19, 2012 #6 of 178
    dpeters11

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    And for wifi, that is theoretical and dependent on many factors (other devices connected, distance from the access point, encryption etc etc.
     
  7. Feb 19, 2012 #7 of 178
    Red Orc

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    I just did a speed test on my laptop using my WiFi and I got about 35MB/s, That's also the same speed as my wired connection.
     
  8. Feb 19, 2012 #8 of 178
    CCarncross

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    My wireless is 54Mb/sec, usually achieving around 40+ speeds....I thought that was implied..I never implied it was 54MB/sec. The wireless speed I'm referring to is my internal wireless network speed, my connection to my ISP is 6Mb/sec( Elite package)....The wired parts of my home network are all gig connections and those devices cant download stuff any faster...my point was if you have a setup similar to mine(many would), switching from wireless to wired would not make VOD any faster, as your internal network, even the wireless parts are faster than most people's ISP connection...again provided your wireless network is up to snuff, mine is.
     
  9. Feb 19, 2012 #9 of 178
    veryoldschool

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    B verses b does make a difference.
     
  10. Feb 20, 2012 #10 of 178
    Red Orc

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    Gotcha
     
  11. Feb 21, 2012 #11 of 178
    allenn

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    The weakest link is the internet service provider. In my case, I have AT&T DSL at 3 Mbs which is far less speed than my N Wireless, or G Bridge, or 1 Gb wired. Currently, AT&T has not throttled back my downloads; so On-Demand for HD programs and Movies work great. Best wishes!
     
  12. Feb 21, 2012 #12 of 178
    Mike Greer

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    Just ran a few speed tests on laptop connected to one of the DECA adapters off one of my HR22s... Nice and quick - about 28 down and 18 up...

    Must be Comcast? This weekend I'll tether my cell phone to my laptop and connect it using ethernet to an HR24.... If On-Demand works faster over my cell phone I suppose I'll start yelling at Comcast. Not that they care!
     
  13. Feb 21, 2012 #13 of 178
    T-Mac

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    I'll be very interested to hear your results because I'm a Comcast customer who's about to switch TV service to DIRECTV and keep the internet with Comcast.

    This seems highly unethical if they are doing this. Comcast already jacks up the monthly internet fee if you don't also have their TV or phone service. Greedy, greedy, greedy.
     
  14. Feb 21, 2012 #14 of 178
    veryoldschool

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    It might be Comcrap. I can only "speak" about the cable service I had, which was over sold, over loaded, and mismanaged. I worked with them over a year trying to resolve the issue. Using speed tests would show the number of users [or the affects of them] over time of day. In all the time trying to work with them, the only change they made was to have speed test always report full speed, so they know how to fool the tests. :nono:
    My last few days with cable, SD On Demand shows were taking 14+ hours to download. DSL had just come into the area, and the cable company simply gave up on "my problem", so I've been with DSL ever since.
    A 6 Mb/s connection gets HD [depending on bit rate] between 1:1 to 1:1.5, which is "close to" being able to watch in real time, after a few mins of buffering time.
     
  15. Feb 21, 2012 #15 of 178
    Red Orc

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    I agree that Comcast is probably the problem. My internet tests at about 35MB/second and it takes me about 2 1/2 to 3 hours to download 1 HD movie.
     
  16. Feb 21, 2012 #16 of 178
    Richierich

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    The Biggest Problem with Speed Test is that they use small files and AT&T, Comcast, etc. are aware of that so they don't Throttle Back until after a certain amount of data has been Downloaded so that is just an Optimal Download Speed but Not Indicative of what takes place after a few minutes Downloading a Large File such as HD Video.

    Sorry to Bust Your Bubble but they have figured out how the Speed Test works and they work around it.

    Unless you can Monitor Download Speeds as they are occurring you will think you have Great Speed but it is just for a few minutes and then you are Throttled Back.
     
  17. Feb 21, 2012 #17 of 178
    veryoldschool

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    I do and AT&T has be "good to me".
    Even when I was on that crappy cable, DirecTV was choked, while large downloads from Microsoft wouldn't be [used service packs as a test]
     
  18. Feb 21, 2012 #18 of 178
    Richierich

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    AT&T has just announced that they will Throttle Back any user that Abuses the Download Threshold which means if you are in the Top 5% of Usage per User you can be Throttled Back as you have been labelled a Data Download Abuser and if you read the Fine Lawyer Print they have the right to do this.

    I just read it last week and more and more ISP Providers are being forced to do it since there is only so much space in the pipeline. :D
     
  19. Feb 21, 2012 #19 of 178
    veryoldschool

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    That's not exactly how they put it in their message to me, but there is a GB limit/month, that varies by account type.

    Welcome to the world of video. "Unlimited access", has a limit, until the ISP has improved their supply side.
     
  20. Feb 21, 2012 #20 of 178
    Richierich

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    You ought to be able to sue them as they are offered Limited "Unlimited Data Plan" but they don't tell you about the Limited Portion of the Agreement unless you can get out your magnifying glass to read the Fine Lawyer Print Data designed to hide all of the information from you.

    Always Read The Fine Print!!!
     

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