1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

options for running HD Sat and broadband on the same coax?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by highway jones, Apr 11, 2011.

  1. highway jones

    highway jones New Member

    2
    0
    Apr 11, 2011
    After trying to install an HD sat. receiver in my bonus room (the same place my modem resides for TWC cable/phone service) I realized that this is not possible on the same line with my current configuration. Directv diplexed my existing cable line for the initial SD installation. I assume these details are not available to Directv Tech Support operators when I recently tried to install my HD receiver. It took a visit from a Tech to make this discovery.

    I would really prefer not to drill for a second line in my bonus room. While I might could set my modem up downstairs, my digital phone line is installed upstairs....plus my only PC is upstairs such that I can control the router, network, etc.

    What are my options?

    Do I just need a way to up-convert the lower band HD Sat prior to diplexing in the cable signal? I have been reading quite a bit about the SWM-8 and diplexing and it sounds like this could be an option but, is there something else besides the SWM-8 that will do the conversion for me? If I did use a SWM, should I use the OTA for cable or should I diplex it in after the power amp? I have also read that cable and HD Sat may no be optimal on the same line. Does this apply to any cable signal or to a specific application(broadband, digital phone, cable TV) ? Note: I have no plans to use MRV.
     
  2. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,435
    929
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    You really don't want to try and diplex cable with HD DirecTV service. Even if you manage to get something that appears to be working, it will be unsupported and if you need service the first thing that will happen is the diplexing will be removed before any other work on your system is done.

    If you absolutely refuse to run another coax into your bonus room, then the cable router needs to come out and anything related to that system done via ethernet.
     
  3. Tech_1438

    Tech_1438 Legend

    157
    0
    Jun 1, 2008
    Your options depend on the model number of the NEW receiver and whether or not it requires an external B-Band converter.

    This will NOT work if the NEW HD receiver is a model H23-600 (internal B-band converter). This should work on all other HD receivers (H20, H21, H24, H25).

    Locate the FIRST diplexer, and place the external B-band converter BEFORE this diplexer. This will upconvert the B-band (250-750 MHz) Ka satellite (99c, 103cb) signals to 1650-2150 MHz prior to the injection of your cable signal frequencies. The B-band converter is directional and MUST be installed properly.

    Again, diplexing of any sort is no longer supported by DirecTV, and having seperate cables for each feed is highly recommended.

    Having said that, this will work fine, provided your new receiver is NOT an H23-600.

    Good Luck!!
     
  4. highway jones

    highway jones New Member

    2
    0
    Apr 11, 2011

    The receiver is an H21. I'll give this a shot first since it is easy and inexpensive. I'll keep the more involved solutions on the back burner in case I notice a deterioration in either my broadband or satellite signal.
     
  5. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

    3,071
    0
    Feb 28, 2007
    I have done this as an installer and it does work. The problem with the diplex installation , as presented here, is always interruption of internet service. If you can work around that by turning off the receiver when on the internet you could be ok.

    The other work around = a new dedicated line.

    Joe
     
  6. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

    5,251
    4
    Mar 18, 2007
    Since DIRECTV receivers are never really "off", how would that help? Maybe the non-DVRs are different (haven't had one in many years).

    Also, not really sure what you mean here:

     
  7. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

    3,071
    0
    Feb 28, 2007
    I am just trying to put things back together in reverse order. I got service calls to fix installations where diplexers were used The complaint was always internet interruption while Directv was being diplexed on CATV lines.

    In thinking on it...you are correct...the cure was disconnecting the Directv receiver from the diplexer. I don't know what output receivers produce when off. In the cases where the customer agreed to connect the receiver when not on the internet they were satisfied with the arrangement. Others got a dedicated line.

    Locating the BBC upstream from the diplexer seemed fundamental. The rest followed according to the comfort level of the customer. I guess there is a reason why Directv chooses not to support this fix.

    Forums are like fruit trees; you get to pick what you like.

    Joe
     
  8. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,679
    348
    Dec 9, 2006
    Non SWiM, is merely the tune voltage to the LNBs.
    SWiM is the 2.3 MHz FSK.
    In either case, it doesn't matter "on or off".

    Now there is a newer internet [DOCSIS 3.0] that is using the 800-1000 MHz band, which will raise hell trying to diplex.
     
  9. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

    3,071
    0
    Feb 28, 2007
    As always, thanks Old School.

    All my experience would be with non SWiM stuff.

    So diplexer stock goes down.

    Joe
     
  10. charlie460

    charlie460 Godfather

    401
    5
    Sep 12, 2009
    DOCSIS 3.0 doesn't necessarily use 800-1000 MHz, it depends on your cable system. I'd say most don't go any higher than 800 MHz.

    My area uses 3 bonded downstream channels, at 585, 591 & 597 MHz.
     
  11. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,679
    348
    Dec 9, 2006
    Not sure of "most" or not, but some do as it was found to not be compatible with a SWiM setup.
    Not sure why a cable company would give up channels that it could use for video to internet, but each company will use what works best for them.
     

Share This Page