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OTA and diplexer

Discussion in 'DISH™ OTA Support and Discussion Forum' started by dkelly701, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. Oct 6, 2013 #1 of 12
    dkelly701

    dkelly701 New Member

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    I need to get an OTA signal to my Hopper. I understand that you cannot use a diplexer with the satellite signal with a hopper, but I have another question. I am outputting the signal from my Hopper to 2 separate TVs. I have one output going to an HD TV via HDMI. I have a second output going to a remote TV in my kitchen using the composite output, through a modulator, through a coaxial cable, to the kitchen TV. Can I use a diaxplexer in this cable to get the OTA signal to my Hopper. If so, what will I need and where can I purchase them?

    Thanks for any help!
     
  2. Oct 6, 2013 #2 of 12
    scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    You don't need a diplexer - you need a combiner. Diplexers are used when you combine 2 signals with non-overlapping frequecies on the same cable and then split them apart again. A Modulated signal combined with OTA are combined - not diplexed. I would recommend that if you do this - that you put your modulated channel above channel 55 (using the OTA channel scale).
     
  3. Oct 6, 2013 #3 of 12
    gov

    gov Legend

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    What kind of margin do you have on OTA signal strength ?

    If you're deep rural and have little strength, you will want to conserve every dB of signal.

    If that is the case, and you already have a VHF modulator, and all your OTA is UHF, UHF/VHF combiner splitters would give a bit more OTA signal to the TV.
     
  4. Oct 7, 2013 #4 of 12
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Given the impending reallocation of these frequencies, this is probably not good advice. It is arguably better to recommend a channel that is at least two "real" channels away from any local broadcast station in the 21-51 range. You may have noticed that DISH already cuts out 14-19 in the agile modulators; they are optional for emergency services and that's where 52-69 were supposed to be allocated to.

    TVFool.com will tell you what "real channels" your local channels broadcast at.
     
  5. Oct 8, 2013 #5 of 12
    dkelly701

    dkelly701 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. OK, I went to Radioshack web site and found this. Is that what I need? It says it is a combiner-splitter. I have several spliters laying around the house. Is any splitter also a combiner? If I purchase this, would I need 2 of them, one to combine and then another identical one to split?

    Thanks for your patience.
     
  6. Oct 8, 2013 #6 of 12
    gov

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    Crikey that's expensive !!
     
  7. Oct 9, 2013 #7 of 12
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    In most cases, yes.
    That depends entirely on where you plan to insert the antenna and I think this is where you might get hung up. You still need to bring a cable from your antenna and it must meet up with the existing distribution cable somewhere along the line.

    You need a combiner to bring the signal onto the cable and another to split the cable between the modulator output and the Hopper's OTA tuner input. Understand that out of the box, the Hopper does NOT feature an OTA tuner so you need to make sure you have one as you embark on this adventure.

    It is important not to get hung up in which way the signals are travelling as the signals aren't directional.
     
  8. dkelly701

    dkelly701 New Member

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    Apr 15, 2007
    I have the cable from the antenna under my house. The cable to the hopper is also under my house. My plan was to combine the signals there and separate them at the hopper. I have an OTA module in the mail.

    Thanks for your help. As soon as the OTA module arrives, I will try your suggestion.
     
  9. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    You must NOT involve the cable coming into the Hopper input in any way. Any signal that leaves the modulator associated with the Hopper must travel on an entirely different cable.

    In the end, there must be four distinct cables:
    • from node to Hopper (DO NOT MESS WITH THIS CABLE)
    • from OTA antenna to combiner input (splitter output)
    • from modulator to combiner input (splitter output)
    • from combiner output (splitter input) to Kitchen TV tuner
    Note that if the node is very near the hopper, there may be a way out that involves using a line from the dish.
     
  10. dkelly701

    dkelly701 New Member

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    Apr 15, 2007
    Yea, I didn't give a very good description of what I have. Bear with me as I try again. There are 2 coaxial cables at my hopper. Cable 1 is the cable that goes from the node to the hopper that I won't mess with. Cable 2 is the cable that takes my signal to the kitchen tv. It is connected to the hopper from the composite output, to a modulator, then to the kitchen through cable 2. The hopper is on the 1st floor of my house and the coaxial cables go from the hopper to a double wall jack and then under my house to the crawl space. That is were the node is located. I also have the coaxial cable from my OTA antenna (cable 3) coming from the attic to the crawl space. My intention was to try to bring in the OTA signal from the crawl space, using cable 2 and then to the hopper. I also want to send out the signal, through the modulator, to my kitchen TV, also through cable 2. So, to recap, cable 2 would get the OTA signal to the hopper while also sending the output from the hopper to the kitchen TV. When I read your instructions above, it seems to me that would send the OTA signal to the kitchen TV, not the hopper.

    As always, thanks for your patience.
     
  11. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    That's where the other combiner comes in. It allows the OTA signal to make a U-turn on the distribution line and come back to the OTA tuner.
     
  12. shadough

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    Dont know why u would even need OTA signal togoto the kitchen. as long as u get it to the hopper, you can use the Hoppers OTA tuner to view the channels anyway, and since your sharing the HD signal from the hopper at both locations........ As i understand it, the OTA tuner is only ONE on the Hopper, so I would assume that the 1 an only tuner would only be viewed on the Hopper itself, an not via any Joey. Therefore, it would behoove you to connect HDMI to local TV, component to KIT tv (for HD Viewing). Or composite, if Hopper even has composite, probably does. With my 922, which has 2 OTA tuners (w/ the add-on module), when using the reciever in dual mode, 1 OTA tuner is viewable at both locations (TV1 & TV2), as is 1 SAT tuner.

    I myself wouldnt touch the cable going from the hopper to the KIT, i'd try to get another cable from the crawl space up to the hopper. just drill a hole in the floor behind the TV if nothing else (where no 1 will c it), or in a closet.
     

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