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OTA and Satellite signal via single coax

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by WB4CS, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. WB4CS

    WB4CS New Member

    150
    33
    Dec 12, 2013
    Huntsville, AL
    I'm considering purchasing a AM21 to add a few local OTA subchannels to my system. I have a Slimline dish with the 3 LNB feeding a HR44 receiver with 2 Genie mini receivers.

    My outdoor antenna is on the house next to the dish. Is it possible to feed the OTA signal through the same coax that comes from the LNB into the house, and then split the signal at the HR44 so that the satellite signal goes into the HR44 and the OTA signal goes into the AM21?

    The home was wired with coax when it was built and all the drops terminate to an outside box. I originally had the OTA antenna connected to this junction box to the living room, but once I got Direct TV the installer used that connection to get the satellite signal to the living room. I'm trying to find a way to not make another coax run to the living room because the living room jack is on an exterior wall where there's not enough room in the attic to make a new drop down the wall.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. peds48

    peds48 DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

    18,441
    915
    Jan 10, 2008
    NY
    nope, you can't diplex with SWM and DECA (MoCA)
     
  3. fleckrj

    fleckrj Icon

    1,546
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    Sep 4, 2009
    Cary, NC
    It would work if you had a SWM 8 and you did not have the Genies, but the Whole Home DVR and Ethernet over coax uses the same frequencies as OTA, so I do not think there is any way it can work in your setup. The OTA will have to go on a separate coax.
     
  4. WB4CS

    WB4CS New Member

    150
    33
    Dec 12, 2013
    Huntsville, AL
    That's kind of what I figured :) I'm a newbie with the current Direct TV systems. About 15 years ago I was a Direct TV subscriber and knew just about everything on how the whole system works and even did a few installs back when it was cheaper to do-it-yourself. Wow have things changed lol.

    Right now I'm looking for information and reading up on how SWM and DECA work. (If you know any good links please share!) I'm a geek and can't just sit back and enjoy satellite TV, I have to know how it all works!

    Thanks for the replies.
     
  5. Supramom2000

    Supramom2000 In Loving Memory of Onyx-2/23/09

    3,787
    159
    Jun 20, 2007
    Colbert, WA
    Solid Signal has a great blog and info. I also search through DBSTalk itself to read up on what I need.
     
  6. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    6,560
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    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    It WILL work to diplex the satellite and antenna outside the house IF you diplex the OTA back out BEFORE that coax cable coming from outside reaches the splitter that connects to your HR44 and clients. The DECA/MRV frequencies don't need to reach the dish, they are used only for communication between the Genie and clients across the splitter. You cannot have a diplexer in the path between those devices.

    Unless your splitter is near to your HR44/AM21 you'd need a second coax run from where you diplex out the OTA to your AM21.

    This isn't something Directv will support, so if you have issues and they send an installer out he may question it and want to remove the diplexers. You can always put them back after he leaves :)
     
  7. SolidSignal

    SolidSignal Cool Member

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    1
    Oct 2, 2007
    Thanks, Supramom2000!

    We don't recommend OTA diplexing with a SWM system but that doesn't mean it's utterly impossible. One method that has worked for some people is to use a combiner to add the signal from an antenna and the signal from the Broadband DECA together. The trick is that you use a band stop filter on the input with the antenna to make sure that no signals that would interfere with the DECA can get through. This sometimes means you lose channels, if any of your locals are on the 475MHz to 625MHz band.

    Personally I wouldn't do it and I certainly would stop doing it if it looked like it was causing problems, but yes, people report they've done it.
     

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