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Please Help Me Connect DTV On Demand

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Connected Home' started by TennisFan, Jul 9, 2010.

  1. Jul 9, 2010 #1 of 11
    TennisFan

    TennisFan New Member

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    Jul 9, 2010
    Hello all,

    I apologize for I have seen this type of thread on here but have also read contradicting responses.

    I am helping set up my dad's electronics for his new house. He just got DTV and their newest HD DVR (I fairly sure it's the HR 24) and has phone/internet from a smaller regional service provider. I have a Netgear WNDR3300 wireless router hooked up to the main PC upstairs and now want to wirelessly connect the HR 24 up to the home network for On Demand. Connecting via wired ethernet is too far and the hard wire method seems like it could be expensive and difficult? I have seen the Linksys N Gaming wireless adapter often suggested but wanted to know if there are less expensive options. I also heard the older model receives less complaints... Any and all help will be much appreciated. Thank you in advance and I apologize for a thread that has been posted before.
     
  2. Jul 9, 2010 #2 of 11
    pappy97

    pappy97 Icon

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    Nov 14, 2009
    Since the router is a dual band router, you could always put the router in 2.4 Ghz mode and broadcast in 802.11g and then get a wireless adapater that works with g.

    Probably won't spend $80-90, maybe more like $50. Someone here can probably suggest a specific product, but I can tell you that you won't be able to do 5Ghz N on the cheap.
     
  3. Jul 9, 2010 #3 of 11
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salem, OR
    Wired Ethernet is good for 100 meters so it isn't too far. It may be too far for a good wireless connection though depending on the construction of the home.

    The Linksys WGA600N is recommended if you want to try it.

    Even if you had to buy all of the tooling to make your own cables, wired would probably be cheaper unless you have to buy special long drill bits and wall fishing equipment.

    Ultimately, wired Ethernet is likely to give you the most expandable, stable and flexible connection to the home network.
     
  4. Jul 9, 2010 #4 of 11
    armchair

    armchair Hall Of Fame

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    Jul 27, 2009
    Yep; I agree but there's also another alternative that works as well as wired ETHERNET. DECA; here's a look at it: http://hr20.dbstalk.com/docs/DECA First Look.pdf (see pages 4 & 5)

    Directv seems to only be installing these by request at install. If you install yourself, make sure you use green label splitters. If you have a recent install, you've got more than one option, IMO. Start by calling Directv. They may do it for free or anywhere up to $74 plus tax. If you have more than one DECA compatible directv box in the house, it's the most convenient way to get Internet connection (it doesn't require unique connections at each box... one connection to the splitter brings it to all boxes over the coax from satellite).

    Anyone considering a switch to Directv or upgrade to Whole Home DVR should ask for the Whole Home DVR with Internet Connection Kit (aka WHD w/ICK make sure that's on your install ticket/confirmation).
     
  5. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salem, OR
    I'm wondering if they'll install Whole Home DVR Service in a scenario with only a single DVR. At $125, it may well be the most expensive solution and will still require running a cable to the router.

    DECA would work, but it isn't nearly as flexible for anything that you might need to connect to the home network and expansion comes at a relatively high price (running a new coaxial cable and installing a broadband DECA for each outlet).
     
  6. armchair

    armchair Hall Of Fame

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    I didn't mean to confuse anyone; in reference to the OP I was suggesting Internet Connection Kit via broadband DECA. If he did in fact have the HR24, only one additional DECA for broadband access would be required and that would be over the existing coax cable. I did make assumptions with my suggestion.

    For anyone else considering, I was suggesting WHD with Internet Connection Kit. Wasn't sure of the OP's TV services so I threw that in there for reference as well. Sorry for the confusion.
     
  7. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salem, OR
    You're assuming, judging by your "existing coax" phrase, that there is a cable running from a SWiM splitter to the room where the router is and that's probably not the case (unless the OP is holding out on us about additional equipment).

    Given a choice, CAT5 is much easier to run than RG6.
     
  8. -Draino-

    -Draino- Godfather

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    May 18, 2008
    New Hampshire
    DECA is the way to go with your setup. You already have a router, now you only need to get a DECA with a COAX and Ethernet feed to that router. Once you have that any H24 or HR24 will only need one COAX cable from the splitter to have whole home DVR and VOD. The DECA I am using for Internet isn't any where near my router because I have an ethernet cable that I ran from the router to an outside wall.

    Wired is cheaper than wireless and far more reliable. Ethernet is good for 100m (329ft) with no issues. CAT5E is real cheap from firefold.com or monoprice.com and will come with connectors already installed.

    Wireless my suite your needs but I have found that for streaming HD content wireless is not satisfactory.

    Good Luck and welcome to DBSTALK:)
     
  9. TennisFan

    TennisFan New Member

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    Jul 9, 2010
    Thank you all for the very helpful responses. Unfortunately, I am having to learn about most of this on the fly (this is my first behind the scenes work with cable or sat). Much of what you guys have suggested has gone way over my head (and for that I apologize).

    I should have been a little more clear with how everything is situated. The PC, modem and wireless router (SuddenLink internet and phone) are on the second floor. There are two tv's on the first floor with simple HD boxes and then there is the basement with another HD box and then the HR24. I would like to hook up BDP's to the two first floor tv's and then one with the HR24 tv in the basement. I'm thinking internet connection to those would be great for firmware updates and such, however, I haven't been able to pick those out yet so I do not know if they will be wifi capable...

    Also, due to this old and weathered PC, I have not been able to look at 'armchair's' link to explain DECA (my laptop bit it just the other day:mad:). I am looking to use my cousin's soon, though. Is DECA the best way to go given my setup? Or is running an ethernet cord through the wall? My dad may not be happy to hear that as he thought the wireless adapter was an option. And I guess it is although, I don't know if the signal will be very stable, given the structure and layout of the house.

    I hope this post helps you understand where I am at and I will read up on DECA and test the wireless signal in the basement with my Xbox later and get back to you guys.

    Let me know if I missed anything. Thanks.
     
  10. TennisFan

    TennisFan New Member

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    Jul 9, 2010
    Thanks!!!
     
  11. armchair

    armchair Hall Of Fame

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    I think in your case the wired ETHERNET is the best way to go. But you may want to look into this setup with BDP: http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?p=2468290#post2468290. It has been done and posted here and the poster wasn't chastised or challenged for it. I didn't go that route myself since I had already ran ETHERNET cables before I upgraded to DECA. You may want to PM the poster and ask how it's working for him. I'm sure he won't mind since he posted it for reference.

    As far as the BDPs, I have a Samsung but I'm not all that thrilled about how it streams Netflix. IDK if streaming Netflix is an option you want but there are other ways to do it. I'm wondering myself how the Roku PLayer compares or if Media Share is a good option or not. I wish Directv had a comparable service to compete with Netflix. I really like streaming the re-runs of old TV series I haven't seen in years. The one thing that got old is swapping disks in the player or waiting for a disk in the mail or forgetting to mail it back.
     

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