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Pole Mount Question

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by mceevans, Oct 16, 2007.

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  1. mceevans

    mceevans Cool Member

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    Jul 15, 2007
    Ok. I am scheduled for an upgrade to the 5lnb dish and HD DVR on November 2nd. I want to put the dish on a pole mount. I understand that it must be a 2” OD heavy gage post. I have called a local Fencing dealer and they said they have that size post. Now I want to put the pole right next to my 6 foot wood privacy fence (my current 3lnb dish is mounted right there on one of the 4x4 posts of the fence). So, since I need the dish to sit just above the fence, I will need an 8 to 10 foot pole so that I can sink a good 2 to 3 feet in the ground in concrete. So I plan to have about 7 feet of post above ground. Does anyone think this will cause a problem having that tall of a post for the 5lnb dish? It is on the east side of my house and is somewhat protected from wind by the house.

    Thanks,
    Mark
     
  2. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

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    Jan 13, 2007
    It should not be a problem as long as it is heavy guage galvanize, three feet in the ground with concrete. Drill the pipe and place a large bolt/pin at 90 degrees so it can't rotate in the cement.
     
  3. 248 F1

    248 F1 Legend

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    Sep 22, 2007
    Agree. Mine is 3' down 10' up so I used black iron and guy wires. Rock solid.
     
  4. finaldiet

    finaldiet Hall Of Fame

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    Jun 13, 2006
    I was going to do it myself until I called DTV about some other matter. I mentioned to the gal I was talking to about putting in pole myself and she said DTV would do it for $52.80. They came out, put pole in concrete, took dish off roof and installed on pole, ran new cable underground to house, re-aligned and did set-up. They provided all material, all for $52.80. Why would anyone do it their-selves?:D
     
  5. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

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    Aug 4, 2006
    That's interesting. Last fall they installed my pole-mount AT9 and ran the underground RG6, all free.
     
  6. 248 F1

    248 F1 Legend

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    Sep 22, 2007
    Because some of us have been visited by installers that are amazed and mesmerized by the intricate mechanics of a garden hose nozzle.
     
  7. condensr

    condensr Mentor

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    Oct 13, 2007
    They actually buried the cable as part of the installation, at no extra charge?

    My local Ironwood office said it was hourly rate (70 something) if I wanted them to bury the cable from my pole mounted dish. I have no LOS from any house mounted locations, so the pole was required.
     
  8. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Sep 3, 2004
    Damn, and I thought this thread was going to be about strippers. :(
     
  9. Coffey77

    Coffey77 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    Nov 12, 2006
    If you do run it underground, make sure the cable is rated for direct burial. It will be a less rigid jacket and will probably cost a bit more. Another solution to this is to get some of that grey pvc used for running electrical wire - usually by the EMT in the electrical section at Home Depot. Depending on where you live, I see Iowa, you may want to sink your post a bit deeper. Freezing can cause the post to heave and tilt/shift. 3' will probably be good but I know our frost line here in IL/Chicago is around 4'. :)
     
  10. Smooth Jazzer

    Smooth Jazzer Legend

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    Sep 4, 2007
    My AT-9 relocation( great LOS) along with the underground RG6 done FREE last June. The two inch pole also included-FREE of charge which is about 7' up.:allthumbs
     
  11. Smooth Jazzer

    Smooth Jazzer Legend

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    Sep 4, 2007
    The reaction is:!pusht!>:backtotop
     
  12. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Sep 3, 2004
    ^ And that is the proper response.

    Beyond that, sorry. Just a joke. You'll have to excuse me. I went to school at Stanford (class of '75). [​IMG]
     
  13. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Sep 3, 2004
    Back on topic.

    Let me reinforce the idea of not directly burying regular coax. I also really like the idea of putting it in a piece of PVC pipe. Direct burial coax is a bitch to work with. It is very stiff and still not resistant to animals, which are the biggest problems with outside wires. What squirrels taste in wire I will never know but it must taste good. Putting the wire in PVC will allow of a lot of flexibility and serviceability in the future should you need to run more or new wires. Make sure your bends are easy - I always used multiple 45 degree adaptors instead of 90 degree elbows - and make it big enough to run a snake through it even if a wire is inside. I like using 2" pipe myself. Also make sure you place a 180 degree turn where it comes out of the ground so that water won't get into the pipe. I usually don't glue these on so they can be removed if you need to run new wires.

    And go to the equipment rental store and rent a trenching tool. Your back will thank you for that.
     
  14. diggerg56

    diggerg56 Legend

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    Sep 26, 2007

    How deep did you bury the pipe?
     
  15. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Sep 3, 2004
    Not that deep. 12" down. It depends on the terrain. Around here it's mostly sandy soil. In that I'll go deeper, maybe 18", because it's so easy with the trenching tool. Plus all the sand that falls back in the trench probably takes me to 12"-15" anyway.

    I made one mistake above. I stopped by the hardware store today on another matter and noticed I tended to use 1 1/2" or even 1 1/4" pipe, not 2". Faulty memory on my part.
     
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