1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Poll- HR20-700 with OTA meters that max at 77%

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by donshan, Oct 20, 2007.

Do you have an HR20-700 showing OTA meter reading that max at 77% (multiple choice)

  1. At least one HR20-700- OTA meters max at 77 -Mfg date July,2007 or later

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. At least one HR20-700- OTA meters max at 77 -Mfg date June 07

    4 vote(s)
    30.8%
  3. At least one HR20-700-OTA meters max at 77 -Mfg date May 07

    3 vote(s)
    23.1%
  4. At least one HR20-700 -OTA meters max at 77 -Mfg date April 07

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. At least one HR20-700 -OTA meters max at 77 Mfg before April 07

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. My HR20-700 OTA meters can read 78-100-Mfg date July 07 or later

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. My HR20-700 OTA meters can read 78-100-Mfg date June 07

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. My HR20-700 OTA meters can read 78-100-Mfg date May 07

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  9. My HR20-700 OTA meters can read 78-100-Mfg date April 07

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  10. My HR20-700 OTA meters can read 78-100-Mfg date before April 07

    4 vote(s)
    30.8%
  11. I Have H20 – OTAmeters max at 77 ( please post mfg date)

    4 vote(s)
    30.8%
  12. Have different HD receiver from above –meters max at 77 (post model/mfg date)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. donshan

    donshan Godfather

    474
    0
    Jun 18, 2007
    The purpose of this poll is to see how wide spread an issue is concerning HR10-700 OTA meters reading a maximum of exactly 77%, and to see if there is any correlation with manufacturing date. Further is this a HR20-700 design/component change or is it a QA problem? This is a first attempt to determine how widespread this issue is.

    This issue concerns OTA meter readings ONLY- not satellite transponder signal levels.

    If you have at least one HR20-700 that has this 77% max problem please check the month of manufacturing ( Label is on the bottom). Also, if you do not have any HR20-700 receivers that have this 77 max issue and display normal behavior,but were manufactured in the April to present time frame please check those boxes. This will help determine if this is a design/component change or a random issue with just some current HR20-700 models. There is poll questions to report any OTHER models with this 77 percent issue. Many have more than one HR-20. If you have at more than one this poll is multiple choice.

    As background, there have been several threads recently reporting HR20-700 receivers where the signal strength meters on both tuners read a maximum of exactly 77%. Mine are rock solid at 77% with zero fluctuation.

    I first discovered this issue this past weekend when I put in a new DB4 UHF roof mount antenna which I ran to a splitter and to our Family Room and a Bed room. Hooked directly to the HDTV internal tuners in these rooms both deliver near 100 readings on all five of our local OTA channels. However when I connect the antenna cables to the Family Rm HR20-700 ( Mfg date 4/07/07) I get readings of 97-100, but on the new Bedroom HR-20-700 (Mfg date 7/21/07) every channel reads exactly 77%. I ran a number of tests, resets and even force downloaded SW 0x18a a second time. Both HR20s are sw 0x18a. The results are:

    It was DBSTalk to the rescue as I found was not the only one finding this OTA 77% max meter reading issue. My posts are in the threads below.


    I especially want to call attention to user bt-rtp whose tests show how the meters max out with increasing signal strength:


    http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?p=1219290#post1219290

    Background threads:

    Started 8/29/07

    http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?t=96518

    Started 10/06/07
    http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?p=1219290#post1219290


    Started 10/20/07
    http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?t=105748
     
  2. Kansas Zephyr

    Kansas Zephyr Hall Of Fame

    1,489
    0
    Jun 29, 2007
    Up to 100% -700s manufactured on 4/12 and 4/26, 2007

    All 77% manufactured 6/17, 2007
     
  3. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

    6,417
    1
    Jan 13, 2007
    You know, I have never checked signal strenght for OTA. Not to negate the importance of your poll, it is only a broadcast TV signal, you either receive it or you don't. The beauty of digital is if you do get the channel it is virtually perfect, compared to the old analog snowy picture drifting in and out. Hopefully the information you gather can at least assist someone choosing an antenna or how to properly aim it.
     
  4. tooloud10

    tooloud10 Legend

    164
    0
    Sep 23, 2007
    You know, this is kind of a half-truth, albeit one that I hear all the time. I find three different levels of digital reception:

    1) It comes in perfectly
    2) It doesn't come in at all
    3) It drifts in and out of various degrees of pixellation, remarkably similar to "the old analog snowy picture"

    So no, the picture doesn't get snowy, but it WILL get pixellated if your receiver is having trouble with the digital signal. I'm not sure how that's any better than than analog.

    IOW, if it comes in perfectly, you're fine (just like analog)...if it doesn't come in at all, it sucks (just like analog)...if it drifts in and out, you'll get snippets of a perfect picture mixed with unwatchable pixellation (an awful lot LIKE analog)
     
  5. davring

    davring Hall Of Fame

    6,417
    1
    Jan 13, 2007
    I suppose my stating you either receive it or you don't was an incorrect way to make my point. Thanks for clearing that up. I don't consider a digital picture watchable when it fades in and out, but analog could a have a consistantly continuous bad picture. Somewhat watchable at least. It is very difficult to measure a digital signal strenght accurately very similar to FM radio.
     
  6. mauijiminar

    mauijiminar Godfather

    264
    0
    Oct 11, 2007
    Well I just switched to D from E.
    NBC E- 100% D 77%
    CBC E- 95% D 77%
    FOX E- 97% D 77%
    Now I wll say this with D I am getting a GREAT PICTURE and no problems. Before I fixed my OTA with E @ 75-80% I had alot of problems! So I dont know if the % with D is better that it is saying or what.
     
  7. Kansas Zephyr

    Kansas Zephyr Hall Of Fame

    1,489
    0
    Jun 29, 2007
    As you'll see from reading the posts, we're trying to figure out whether a metering software bug or hardware issue exists with the newer units, that's leading to false displays.

    That's all.

    We're not carping about "getting the signal" or not.

    Bad metering can interfere with OTA antenna tweaking.
     
  8. donshan

    donshan Godfather

    474
    0
    Jun 18, 2007
    I agree that it is those intermittent bouts of pixellation or sound dropouts or both that are very frustrating. Everyone has experienced such problems at some time when using OTA antennas. Your description of drifting in and out is typical of of multipath reflections hitting the antenna, that are far more common that realized. The question then becomes where is this coming from, and can it be corrected? I find these meters give a lot more info than just one time aiming the antenna. That is why I am not happy about this stuck at 77% meter issue.

    When a primary data bit stream arrives at the receiver along with a slightly delayed reflected copy of those same numbers, receivers can become confused and lose essential data numbers that lead to pixelization and sound drops. This is a well known problem in the ASTC 8vsb digital broadcast signal. Error correction routines are built into receivers and the lower the error rate the higher the meter reading. Each new receiver generation has become better at multipath error correction. This link below has a discussion and excellent drawings about how obstacles break up the RF signal into multiple paths.

    http://www.hdtvprimer.com/ANTENNAS/siting.html

    And see the discussion of mulipath in this link

    http://www.hdtvprimer.com/ANTENNAS/glossaryG.html#multipath

    A bouncing signal meter is likely indicative of some multi-path reflections hitting your antenna from hills or buildings or diffraction due to lack of direct line of sight to the towers . If the bounce is small, the receiver error correction fixes it. If multipath is excessive you get a pixelated picture or sound drop. Adjusting antennal angle not only for maximum reading, but also for a stable minimum bounce is a part of using these meters. Sometimes changing the directional angle or using a narrower beam width directional antenna can reduce this multipath pixelation/sound drops.

    Two other examples of how meters are valuable:

    When I put a Channel Master pre-amp on a VHF-UHF antenna the signal went DOWN instead of UP. I was trying to get a channel 8 digital station from 66 miles away , but the VHF antenna also picked up FM radio and the preamp amplified that too overloading the D* tuners ( This was an HR10). a Installing an FM trap in the RG6 line corrected the problem and raised the meter from 20 to 80 and I got the distant OTA Fox station fine .

    I also had a case where the wind rotated my antenna a little and only one channel started pixelating, but it was accompanied by a bouncing signal meter. I first thought it was the station, but then I checked with a friend and he had no problem. When I examined my antenna and corrected the aim the meter bouncing stopped and the pixelation stopped too.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page