1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Powerline Ethernet Adapter

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by gomezma1, Mar 8, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Mar 8, 2012 #1 of 12
    gomezma1

    gomezma1 Godfather

    462
    0
    Mar 28, 2006
    Can someone please recommend a compatible powerline ethernet adapter to use with my R22-200? My modem only has on ethernet port. Can I just disconnect the computer one and plug the adapter one in or should I get a modem with two ethernet ports? I have ATT broadband service.
     
  2. Mar 8, 2012 #2 of 12
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,683
    348
    Dec 9, 2006
    "I can't", but regardless of which you might try, remember it's the house wiring that effects how well or not they work.
    These need to share the same circuit [on the same breaker] to work very well. If they're not, things go downhill really fast.
     
  3. Mar 8, 2012 #3 of 12
    gomezma1

    gomezma1 Godfather

    462
    0
    Mar 28, 2006
    I read in the manual that the wireless connections are no good. my computer is far away from the dvr. may just give up.
     
  4. Mar 8, 2012 #4 of 12
    sdk009

    sdk009 Icon

    695
    19
    Jan 19, 2007
    Kihei, Maui, HI
    I use the Netgear XE102 powerline adapters from my router upstairs to my HR20-100 downstairs and it works fine. I too am an AT&T dsl customer. Not being a true tekkie, so I would take my word for what-its-worth, but buying a router to connect and distribute your internet connection from your modem should work better than a modem with two ethernet ports. By the way, Netgear no longer makes the XE102, so I bought mine used from a dealer I found on Amazon.
     
  5. Mar 8, 2012 #5 of 12
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,683
    348
    Dec 9, 2006
    Well they have their weakness too, "but" if you can set them up right, by selecting a good location for the transmitter and find channels not being used by other WiFi, you can get them to.
    I found some software that lets me see what is going on, and took it to a friend and found he was getting it to work from about 200' away while using the 2.4 GHz band.
    At my location there are a lot of other WiFi networks, so distance wasn't my concern, but "noise" was.
    I posted some about this here: http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?p=2975399#post2975399
     
  6. Mar 8, 2012 #6 of 12
    HarleyD

    HarleyD Hall Of Fame

    1,357
    62
    Aug 31, 2006
    I also use XE102 powerline adapters.

    They are fine for Mediashare and VOD. For MRV...not so hot. Once MRV went out of Beta and you had to start paying for it I stopped using it.

    Of course as veryoldschool pointed out your household wiring is the linchpin in Powerline adapter performance and my house was built in 1935 so I'm sure there is some impact there.

    Been thinking about picking up a couple of WET610N wireless bridges. You can get factory refurbs for about $45 however unlike your setup both of my MPEG4 compatible units (R22-200 & HR20-700) are within 25' of the wireless router. In fact the HR20 is on the opposite side of a common wall, probably 6 feet away...I just don't want to drill a hole in the wall to hard wire it.
     
  7. Mar 8, 2012 #7 of 12
    HarleyD

    HarleyD Hall Of Fame

    1,357
    62
    Aug 31, 2006
    You can find refurbed XE102s on ebay.
     
  8. Mar 8, 2012 #8 of 12
    lesz

    lesz Legend

    218
    1
    Aug 3, 2010
    I used a Cisco/Linksys PLE300 powerline adapter for a couple of years before I got my DIRECTV DECA set up. It worked great and just as well as my DECA set up does for both sharing programming between my DVRs and with DIRECTV2PC. In fact, I don't see any difference whatever between how the powerline dapter worked and how my DECA works now. For my set up, the powerline adapter's send and receive units are not on the same electrical circuit, and they still work fine. My home (and wiring) are about 13 years old. The powerline adapter was pretty much plug and play and worked as advertised right out of the box.

    Even though I am no longer using the powerline adapter for my DIRECTV service, I'm using it now to connect a TV and BluRay player to the internet, and it works great with those, too.

    I don't believe that Cisco is still making the PLE300. I think the current model is the PLEK400. When I bought my PLE300, I bought a reconditioned unit from the Cisco website, and the price was about 1/2 the normal retail price for a new unit.
     
  9. Mar 8, 2012 #9 of 12
    gomezma1

    gomezma1 Godfather

    462
    0
    Mar 28, 2006
    Thanks for the info. Can an administrator please close this thread.
     
  10. makaiguy

    makaiguy Icon

    898
    36
    Sep 24, 2007
    Aiken, SC
    I only know what I've read here and so am certainly no expert, but I was under the impression that the two didn't need to be on the same circuit, but to work best they must be on the same 110-v leg of the house circuitry, with most modern homes receiving 3-wire 220-v service, split into multiple 110-v legs for the various circuits.
     
  11. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    42,683
    348
    Dec 9, 2006
    It really comes down to the distance it has to travel.
    Two different circuits, but on the same leg/phase of the 220, means they cross at the power panel. This may be no worse than if they're on the same breaker.
    Now try going between legs/phases of the 220, and it needs to travel all the way to the transformer and back.
    I've heard of crossovers being installed on power panels that allow bridging of what you want and blocking of what you don't want, but these wouldn't be "customer installs".
    Romex was never designed for "high frequency", so it shows the talent of the manufactures that it works at all, and if you have "knob & tube", like the poster earlier with a house built in '35, chances of it working drop dramatically.
    DSL works over twisted pair that was never intended for anything close to the frequencies used. Again how well it works depends on how far you are from the CO, remote terminal, VRAD, etc.
     
  12. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

    37,060
    287
    Jun 18, 2006
    Closing your thread per your request.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page