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Problem with home network

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by Joe C, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. Mar 2, 2005 #1 of 25
    Joe C

    Joe C Godfather

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    I have set up a home network with 2 computers running XP pro and service pack 2. Things were working fine for a while but now I have run into a problem.

    The scenario, computer A can see everything on computer B and pulls files from B. Computer B can see everything on A and pull and receive files from A.

    The problem, I cant not send a file from A to B. An error msg comes up stating that the disk is write protected, full or the file may be in use.

    Does anyone know what I am doing wrong ? Thanks for any and all answers.
     
  2. Mar 2, 2005 #2 of 25
    Jason Nipp

    Jason Nipp Analog Geek in a Digital World Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    Are you running Zonealarm, Norton Internet Security, BlackIce, or any other kind of software non-natting firewall? disable them and see if your issue clears up. If it does you will have to scale back your settings a bit.

    I have to disable my internal protection while doing peer to peer sharing.
     
  3. Mar 3, 2005 #3 of 25
    SimpleSimon

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    One of the most common issues is to not have the folder set t be able to be written to from the network.

    Bring up the properties dialog for the shared folder and make sure it's enabled.
     
  4. Mar 3, 2005 #4 of 25
    Joe C

    Joe C Godfather

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    Jason, I have disabled the Norton Personal firewall, no change

    SimpleSimon, I will try that when I get home

    Thanks for the tips guys, please keep them coming.
     
  5. Mar 3, 2005 #5 of 25
    cdru

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    The share has to be be read-write, but in addition, the actual directory must also have read-write permissions. I'd put my money on this being the problem over a firewall-type issue.
     
  6. Mar 3, 2005 #6 of 25
    Bogy

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    As cdru said, the sharing box not only needs to be checked, but the box to allow other users to write to your disk needs to be checked.

    I have also had problems with Norton's firewall, but in most cases it won't even let the computers see each other.
     
  7. Mar 4, 2005 #7 of 25
    Joe C

    Joe C Godfather

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    Both boxes are checked but still no go. I have had the same problems with Norton Personal Firewall, it wont even let you see another computer. I'm thinking of reformating the HD and starting over as there are a few other quirks on this computer that I don't like.
     
  8. Mar 4, 2005 #8 of 25
    Bogy

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    The Norton Personal Firewall needs to come with a label that states, "If you have a home network and want to share files and printers, don't waste your time trying to make this sucker work."
     
  9. Mar 4, 2005 #9 of 25
    DonLandis

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    Right! Never did care for either Symantic or Norton stuff but that's just my opinion which is not based on any real science.

    Anyway, as some of you know I have been going round and round with intermittant network issues here too. I believe I finally have many of them resolved. Joe, you may follow what I ended up doing and copy some of it for good results as well.

    First, my system was a hodge podge of technology mix from the 80's through the present day. Way too complicated to be any good but I just kept adding to it over the years. This week I finally said to hell with this and went to the store and purchased a one box does all from Linksys. It is the wireless G WRT54G router with built in firewall. Simon, I finally put that new 54G right on the cable modem following the linksys setup wizard to configure it. It worked all except the WEP Keycode which I had to log on and set up later. From the WRT54G I fed a cable to my 8 port switch and connected all the 10/100 computers to that. I had a problem with the Thinnet trunk translators that feed the Color laser printer and my wife's windows 98se computer in her sewing room but adding the original second older router that used to work with the Thinnet translater got that end of the system reconnected. That end of the house is too far to run a twisted pair cable so I used the old Thinnet cable that runs through the walls. It works good enough but soon I plan to dump that mess and replace with wireless cards and a wireless printer card.

    After all was working I tested my IPAQ PDA and now it works great too. I was concerned that the range of this new WRT54G would not reach my poolside but I was pleasantly surprised. The signal, from the new WAP location is not only reaching strong through the house several walls but to the end of my yard about 150yds away! I used my PDA IPAQ to test the wifi connection. I bought a Linksys repeater but have yet to find a dead zone in my yard with the new WRT54G.

    Since I had removed my original 2001 vintage firewall and had all the lan and WAP using the firewall built into the WRT54G, I decided it is a good idea to use an online probing service to verify my security. Did that, andit gave me a secure report.

    So, in conclusion, I found that using a simpler system that puts the WAP (WRT54G with built in firewall right on the modem and feed the rest of the Lan from that resolved many of my connection problems. I don't understand the new RF technology but the WRT54G seems to work much much better that the older stuff I had in place over the years. Basically, signal strengths are much higher, less noise and faster file transfers, plus far more reliability on the G speed that previously did not work well with the older G devices.

    Sometimes, we just have to rip everything out and start over again! Right? The next phase of this will be to permanently retire the ThinNet and replace with Wireless G. I only have two older computers and a printer on that section of the LAN anyway.

    As for lan sharing- Joe, I have most of my drives shared here because I have to access and modify them all from remote locations on the lan. In order to communicate with other computers you must have the drives or folders set for sharing but that will only get you read capability. If you want to transfer files, rename etc. from the lan you must also check the box that allows you to do that and ignore the warning about not doing that. If you tie to the internet, as I;m sure you do, then the firewall should protect you from others accessing your drives and stealing or planting stuff. Just do what I did after everything's working and go online and have one of the test sites probe your network for leaks. I used this one and 3 others:

    http://scan.sygatetech.com/quickscan.html
     
  10. motorcycle_rider

    motorcycle_rider Cool Member

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    If you are using nortons it is possible to set up your home network. I am assuming that you are using norton internet security. You would need to know your internal ip's for the computer that you wish to allow access too. It will probably be something like 192.168.1.???.
    At this point open your Norton. Click on personal firewall. On the lower right side click configure. Click the networking tab. At this point add the ip of the computer that you wish to allow access to. Again make sure it is your internal ip and not the WAN IP. Now this should allow you to have your access. Also as others have suggested make sure that you have allowed read/write access to the folder in sharing. I would suggest using a password for write access. This set up has been working great for me for some time.
     
  11. DonLandis

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    Motorcycle rider-
    Sorry for my ignorance but how do you do what you said when running DHCP? MY router is a DHCP server and assigns the computers on my lan (1 to 13 now) with differing IP's depending on what's on and what's not. What you suggest doesn't seem practical with DHCP.
     
  12. Bogy

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    One of my failures with setting up computer sharing with Norton Firewall installed was in a university dorm room on the university system. Two other semi-gurus failed before me. It worked fine with XP SP2s firewall however.

    I did get it to work here at home, but was bugged by constant messages and refusal to ignore things I told it were OK. Same problem with Norton's Virus Scanner. I had taken off my computer, and then took Norton off my son's computer when it would continually pop up in the middle of things he was doing, like playing a game. Sorry, just not impressed with Norton. I used the XP firewall and installed my old favorite AVG and am much happier. AVG immediately found a mediocre virus Norton had missed. I don't know how people put up with Norton. They must not know there are better, and free, options out there.
     
  13. SimpleSimon

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    Bogy - finally something you & I agree on. :)

    Add McAfee - especially the worthless AOL version - to the garbage list, too.
    (Sorry, John - but your company has gone downhill since you sold it - your WiFi ISP is aces, though. ;) Help Kerry get Divide covered soon, please! LOTS of demand there.)

    Edit: Oh - the same logic applies to the anti-spyware software, too. SpySweeper, et al are near worthless. The 3-way team of AdAware, Spybot S & D, and SpywareBlaster are (so far) unbeatable. Add in the ActiveX protection in XP-SP2, and you're golden. Only time will tell if the MS stuff will be worthwhile.
     
  14. motorcycle_rider

    motorcycle_rider Cool Member

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    Ok a few question i would need to ask to actually be of any use. What kind of router do you have. It may be in the above post but its been a long day. Once i get that information I will send a few links to help you configure it correctly. You are running xp??? You will have to configure a few settings on the router and in xp to give your internal networks static ip's.
     
  15. motorcycle_rider

    motorcycle_rider Cool Member

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    To make your computers ip static on your network you will need to do the following. I will post a link to a walk thur of pictures of the process if you request it. You may not use the identicle addresses do not be concerned with that. Mine are actually nothing like the ones below. If you have questions ask away.



    Windows 2000/XP

    1. Click on the Start menu, and then click on the Run option.
    2. When the “Run” window appears, input control ncpa.cpl into the “Open” field.
    3. After the “Network and Dial up Connections” or “Network Connections” window opens, right click on the Local Area Connection or Wireless Network Connection which controls the connection to the router.
    4. After the “Local Area Connection Properties” or the “Windows Network Connection Properties” window appears, click on Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) then click on the Properties button.
    5. Once the “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties” window opens, change the option from “Obtain an IP address automatically” to Use the following IP address. Set the options under “Use the following IP address” and “Use the following DNS server addresses” to the following:

    *
    IP: 192.168.1.20 (If there are multiple computers being setup with static IP's, then the next computer would be .25, and next would be .30, etc)
    *
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    *
    Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
    *
    Preferred DNS server: 192.168.1.1

    6. Click OK then OK or Close.
     
  16. DonLandis

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    Motorcycle rider- I have a linksys system but I understand the point and knew how to do static IP's. My question was asking how it could be done with DHCP and aparently it can't. I also use quite a few OS here due to software requirements., i.e. win 95 OSR2, Windows for workgroups, Windopws 2000, win XP SP2, Win 98se, Windows mobile pc 2003. I believe that about covers the range of required operating systems in use on the lan. :)
     
  17. SimpleSimon

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    Well, Don, you left off Win 2000 Server - or any variation thereof.

    Shame, you could use THAT as your DHCP server to keep all your pseudo-static assignments in one place.

    But aren't we trying to kill an ant with ana tom bomb here?

    If I remember the problem correctly, it's just Norton. Kill Norton. And die evil AOL, die! Oops - got carried away there for a minute.
     
  18. DonLandis

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    Well, I don't have this system to support the network. I have it to support the older software I sometimes need to run that really doesn't run in subsequent OS. Actually, the win2000 machine could now be upgraded to xp because I retired the Pinnacle Edition and Animation that ran under it. I agree with you about Norton- retire it! because there are other products, just as good mostly better I understand out there.

    AOL- I rolled my account back to $4.95 per month and carry it for those few places I get stuck in my travels that does not yet support GPRS wireless internet connect. In all my research to dump aol- I found it remained superior for a backup service to have nationwide dialup access when needed. Others I found were equal to aol but inferior to phone numbers. Since I only use it as insurance for a connection from a hotel room, the cost needed to be low yet connections everywhere. AOL satisfies my need.
    Then as a side benefit- Having the aol account allows me to troubleshoot a problem when a client who uses it may complain about my video web service I may do for him. AOL sometimes has these weird issues. But when a complaint does come in I can at least verify it as aol or something they are doing wrong. Again- $4.95 is a cheap insurance for that capability in my business.
     
  19. Joe C

    Joe C Godfather

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    Motorcycle, I currently have Norton personal firewall disabled, I am relying on the Windows built in firewall right now. I will follow your directions and see how it works. I am using a Liksys wired router if that makes any difference.

    Don, are you talking about sharing the contents of the root drive and checking that box ? I'm going to try it.
     
  20. motorcycle_rider

    motorcycle_rider Cool Member

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    Joe I am currently using a linksys router also. I have 3 computers that have access to each other. One XP pro, Two running XP home. On the xp pro system i am running windows firewall and Nortons internet security. On the xp home systems I am running Windows firewall and Zone alarm. Now I followed these steps for static ip for each of my computers.

    Computer A IP 192.168.2.100
    Computer B IP 192.168.2.101
    Computer C IP 192.168.2.103

    Now how i configured nortons was in configure for personal firewall, under networking, Trusted IP's are 192.168.2.101 and 192.168.2.103. You may or may not need to rerun the
    Set up Home or Small office wizard again on both computers. Remember to name your workgroup name the same on both.

    I also had to set the appropriate IP's on both of the computers running Zone Alarm in its settings but this is irrelivant in your case.
     

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