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Producer/Director Tony Scott dead at 68

Discussion in 'The OT' started by phrelin, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    You will find a number of stories on line. Tony Scott, 68, the brother and partner (Scott Free Productions) of producer/director Ridley Scott, director of Top Gun, Days of Thunder, and many other movies, and Producer of a long list of movies and TV shows including "The Good Wife" and "Numb3rs", climbed a fence on the bridge in Southern California and jumped around 12:30 p.m. today. Reportedly police found a suicide note at his home.

    He had a number of projects in planning or production. He will leave a void in the business.

    At this point, the most complete obituary is on Variety.

    RIP
     
  2. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Whoa!!

    I'm shocked.

    I can totally understand committing suicide as a teenager. Finding life sucks is a terrible realization.

    And even as a young adult, trying to transfer into what society says you should be...or not making that transition, depending on your inclination...that can be tough. More than once, back then I felt offing myself then would be a very easy way out.

    But when you are 68 and successful?????

    What the f***, Tony?

    Unless you were screwing the neighbor's German Shepard and that was going to be on Page One in the LA Times, what possible problem can't an assistant, a lawyer, an agent, and a totally legal, just around the corner pot dispensary solve?

    This I don't understand.
     
  3. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Very tragic and a great loss for Hollywood. He directed many great films including Top Gun, Crimson Tide, Spy Game, ect. He will be missed. R.I.P. Tony.
     
  4. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    Supposedly he had inoperable brain cancer.
     
  5. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    WHOA!

    Shame to lose a gifted legend like Tony Scott, reagardless of the circumstances.

    RIP.
     
  6. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    Real shame.
    From that Obit:
    Air Force?? Really?
     
  7. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    I'm sorry but this excuse doesn't come even close to cutting it for me.

    Eleven years ago I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. It is an incurable bone marrow cancer where your bones turn to swiss cheese and your urinary system fails. It is a slow, painful and ugly way to die. There is no treatment beyond experimental ones like bone marrow transplants and of all things, thalidomide, but those will just extend the life of the patient. They don't halt the cancer or cause it to go into remission.

    Upon further review, it turns out my diagnosis was incomplete. In multiple myeloma, all of the blood producing bones in your body are putting out cancerous tumors. In my case, I had the same cancer but instead, the tumors were being only put out by my L4 vertebra in my back. I had a solitary plasma cytoma. Unfortunately, it took that vertebra exploding and my becoming paralyzed for that diagnosis to be made, but it was. Because of an operation that removed all of the shards of the bone and pieces of the tumor from my back, along with receiving massive doses of radiation, I am now cancer free. The doctors consider me cured. I am one of the few people I know who can say they were cured of cancer. Statistically, I am literally one in a hundred. In my oncologist's case, I'm one in over 300. I'm the only patient of his to be diagnosed with multiple myeloma who has lived.

    Any cancer patient who has a strong will to live knows are always options. Suicide negates those options.

    (Just to finish the story, I went through months of rehab to learned how to walk again. I am actually pretty good now and you wouldn't know I'd been paralyzed, unless you ask me to pick something up off the ground. With five vertebra fused, I don't do that easily anymore.)
     
  8. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    While the debate on suicide is a valid one....I believe this thread was intended to announce and comment on the death of Tony Scott, regardless of the circumstances.

    A loss is a loss.
     
  9. Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Not to drive this thread off course but you touched upon something interesting. Obviously you have a strong will to live but shouldn't it be reasonable to allow others to make the decision to end their life who do not want to endure the pain of cancer treatments and rehab? I personally have thought about this a great deal ever since watching my mother suffer the pain of cancer treatments. She did everything the doctors told her for over 10 years. Then, the cancer came back a third time and after suffering more pain and getting pneumonia, she finally pulled the plug herself (removing her breathing tube).

    I don't fault her for that because she tried her best all the way to the end. In any case, calling it an "excuse" is kind of a strong word. We all have our limits. Luckily, yours are very high. That's a good thing.

    In any case, I was saddened to hear about Tony Scott. He has been one of my favorite directors. His films have always been exciting to watch. I'm kind of curious what the suicide note said but I would imagine we will never find out. RIP.
     
  10. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Thank you for your thoughtful reply, Chris.

    My mother died of lung cancer at the age of 82. At the time she was diagnosed, I was all ready to move in with her and lead her on a courageous battle against the disease. I wanted an operation. I wanted chemotherapy. I wanted her to fight it. I wanted her to be like me. Instead, she said she wouldn't and instead would let the disease take its course.

    I was very angry with her and thought she was being chicken, although I wouldn't have said that to her. Still, I rejected her decision.

    And then I got to understand it. Her husband was dead. All of her friends were dying. She'd lived a full life and she felt it was time for her to go. My mother was a very proper lady and she wouldn't have overstayed her welcome at a dinner party. She didn't want to do that with life either. I learned that her decision, far from being cowardly, was a very courageous one. She wanted to meet death on her terms, not its. Death does come to us all. She wanted to take control of her own passing. She gradually declined in health over the course of six months (the doctor gave her 2-3) and died peacefully at home with me by her side. Instead of being frightful, her death was one of the most beautiful experiences in my life. I didn't know death could be so life affirming. Hers was.

    My mother did go on an excursion two days before she died to get her hair done. You can't go into the afterlife looking poorly, now, can you? That's part of looking death in the eye and saying, "You're going to do it my way."

    I find a world of difference between being a vibrant man of 68 who nobody saw as sickly, or one of 48 when I was diagnosed with cancer, and being 82 and feeling your string has run out.

    I'm also not saying that if I had the standard version of multiple myeloma, I might not have shortened down the final days by a few. Hospice is a wonderful thing and they help patients make these tough decisions all the time.

    We don't know if Tony Scott was sick. It is only a conjecture in this thread. If he was, he owed it to life itself to look into other options.
     
  11. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Rest in Peace, Mr. Scott
     
  12. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    For a person who's life was built around creating fictional worlds involving vision, hearing, talking, etc., anything brain related would create a great deal of fear and depression.

    It's upsetting that he made the choice to jump off a bridge at age 68. But it is understandable if he was facing an inoperable brain tumor that would at some undefined time make it impossible for him to control how he lived and how he died.

    With that said, whatever happened it is sad and this photo from two years ago does cause one to wonder about his choice:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    Some people deal with bad news differently. I guess it comes down to being a "glass is half full" or a "glass is half empty" person. Tony saw his glass as half empty where as you see yours as half full.

    Personally I think everyone is using the wrong size glass. :)
     
  14. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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  15. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    The quote there from the coroner is suspect. It makes it sound, at least to me, like he did and his family didn't know.

    "The family of director Tony Scott, who died Sunday after jumping off a Los Angeles bridge, was not aware Scott had cancer, Los Angeles County Coroner Ed Winter told ABC News station KABC in Los Angeles."

    Poorly constructed statement, possibly, but you never know in L.A. He might not have told them.
     
  16. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Interesting observation but take that quote in context. It sounds like the coroner's statement is what caused ABC News to back off their original claim that Scott had brain cancer. ABC News certainly didn't read it the way you did. In fact, they read it the opposite way. As you pointed out, RunnerFL, I think poor sentence construction is the fault here.

    It's really a moot point. We'll find out in a few weeks one way or another.
     
  17. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone DBSTalk Club

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    People over the age of 65 have the highest suicide rate of any age demographic. Every 90 minutes, someone over the age of 65 commits suicide. Growing old's a bitch.
     
  18. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    No one can decide where his note was even. I've heard his office, his home and his car...
     
  19. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Tell me about it. At 73, it's the hardest thing I've ever had to do, and what with a stroke, diabetes, HBP and high cholestoral, it's not getting any easier. On the other hand, considering the alternative, growing old ain't so bad after all.
     
  20. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    Yeah, when my age 50+ kids occasionally complain about aches and pains, I tell them old age is great as it just gets worse. And add to that quintuple bypass surgery and a radical prostatectomy and aging is just grand. But it is still better than the alternative at this point.

    Now a diagnosis of inoperable brain cancer or Alzheimer's disease might alter one's view. But given Scott's family situation - younger wife and 12-year-old twin sons - it does cause one to wonder about his choice.
     

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