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Rain Fade

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Lanthom, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. Jhon69

    Jhon69 Hall Of Fame

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    Central San...
    If a realignment doesn't help you may be in an area that may needs a larger reflector(satellite dish).
     
  2. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    Except that is typically limited to locations on the fringes of the CONUS or spot beam, and areas that get significant rain. Knoxville doesn't fall in either category.
     
  3. wildbc

    wildbc Cool Member

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    What adjustment needs to be made to improve the signal strength for the 99 and 103 sats. I also have low numbers on these sats, nothing above 80. Called D*, but they won't even setup a tech visit without a phone call while losing the picture. I would try to "tweak" a little, one way or the other, but I don't know which way to move the dish. Any suggestions. Thanks.
     
  4. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Look up "Dixie Alley" and see if it may have some bearing.
     
  5. Lanthom

    Lanthom Legend

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    Talked my neighbor into coming over and realligning my dish. Saved me a $80 service call but couldn't convince him to take any compensation (I tried to tip him something for his 45 minutes).

    He said my strengths weren't bad but they weren't good. I'm now getting an extra 5-10% on all transponders. Everything is now 95+ except for 99c which for some reason we could barely get to 90. The 4 transponders on 101 that they check are all 100 and they were running 92 or so.

    Now I just need a bad storm to roll through here and see what happens. Only time will tell but I'll let everyone know how the next storm turns out.
     
  6. jdspencer

    jdspencer Hall Of Fame

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    Do these signals drop before the storm actually arrives? Or once it starts raining?

    Everyone is talking about cabling problems, but no one has mentioned the connections on the cable. It could be moisture in a connection. Especially at the ground block. Maybe moisture is getting into the LNB housing.
     
  7. BAHitman

    BAHitman Godfather

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    Austin Texas
    The best thing I ever did was to get my own signal meter and reallign my dish myself... I almost NEVER lose the signal anymore, and if I do, I usually find that all I need to do is reallign the dish... about once a year.

    A point on the cabling is needed as well... making sure that the installer (and any cabling in the house) uses the compression connectors and not the crimp-on kind is a plus. granted that cabling attenuation is miniscule compared to that caused by the weather, it stll attributes to it...
     
  8. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    I did. And it doesn't. According to sites referencing it, DA apparently refers to tornadoes. If you are getting good reception inside a tornado, you probably also have plenty of rain fade margin. But one would think there would be more to worry about than whether Are You Smarter than a Cheese Grater cuts out if you are also inside a tornado.
     
  9. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    Aug 31, 2002
    Moisture in the air is what causes the attenuation. Whether it is dropping towards the earth or not is not really important, so yes, you can have rain fade without actual rain. It is a function of how much moisture there is, and also what size the droplets are. The closer they are to the size of whatever wavelength the signal you are trying to receive is, the more each drop absorbs and traps the signal rather than simply refracting it (refraction has little effect).

    I think the category "cabling" automatically implies connectorization as well. A connector that has moisture in it or the possibility of getting moisture in it is a bad (or simply loose) connector that needs replacing (or at a minimum, tightening). Good connectors stay dry at all times (on the inside where it counts, at least).

    LNB housing? I think that implies a bad LNB, or at least one that will soon be bad. It would seem that not making that waterproof in the first place would be a fatal error on DBS's part.
     
  10. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    And what kind of weather often begats tornadic activity?

    Think thunderheads and supercells in the skies between the satellites and the dishes.

    While Nashville itself is not in the alley, it is just north of the alley.
     
  11. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 27, 2007
    Lake Norman, NC

    A couple of weeks ago, we had storms every day from the west / southwest and in general, I could tell we were going to get rain because the rain fade happened 5-10 minutes before the bottom would fall out. Usually the signal would return while it was raining cats and dogs here.

    Here in NC, the dish is looking SW - around 220 - and the cross-section of the cloud it's looking through had more effect than the rain coming down on us!
     
  12. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    Once the questions become consdescending and passive aggressive and devolve to grade-school level, I think we're done here, even if the question uses improper grade-school level grammar from circa 1838.

    There are a lot of "alleys". One could consider the entire middle third of the country tornado alley, and many do. I grew up in SD, which is considered by the locals as part of tornado alley. Oklahoma residents feel they are just as much in it as well. And, that is all totally beside any reasonable on-topic point made in this thread, so that should be the last word regarding it.

    What's more, all of these areas do not even have overcast skies much of the time, let alone enough rain on average to regularly squash reception, as they do in the pacific northwest or Alaska. Once again, those folks often procure larger dishes to maximize their rain fade margin. Sounds like a plan.

    After performing all of the other things mentioned here to maximize rain fade margin, I would politely suggest that either opening the wallet for a larger dish or moving are both choices that are much more constructive than either imagining that local rain issues are more significant than they actually are as compared to almost anywhere else in the country except the pacific NW or Alaska, or moaning about it on the forums.

    Other than the pacific NW and Alaska (Canada isn't licensed for DTV, is it?), the continental US has weather that allows DBS systems to work 99.99% of the time, which means 8 or 9 hours of rain fade or sun fade alignment issues, on average, per year. Many of us tolerate that without pouting all that much. Those who want to pout have options, and maybe they should exercise them a little bit more and pout a little bit less.

    IOW, it sounds to me like a personal problem, which I no longer give two $#!+s about. I'm out.
     
  13. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salem, OR
    What larger dish do you recommend that our friends that are suffering rain fade open their wallets for?
     

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