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Read any good books lately?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Strong, Nov 3, 2003.

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  1. toenail

    toenail Hall Of Fame

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    That whole story, which is quite fascinating, is summarized at the following link. Both Pink Floyd and Loverboy are involved. http://slashdot.org/features/01/06/05/1034234.shtml
     
  2. Danny R

    Danny R Goblin the Pug DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I just started Pandora's Star by Peter Hamilton. I love all of Hamilton's works thus far. He knows how to write a great scifi epic story packed with details and ideas of what the future might bring.

    The first chapter of this book introducing one of the main characters is great. On the day of the first human mission to Mars, the astronauts step out of their landing craft and make a dramatic speech. They hear snickering in the background. Turning around, they see the California sun shining through a wormhole and a postdoctoral student in a home-made pressure suit offering them a quick ride home.

    The story then jumps forward to the timeline of the rest of the story, when wormholes have totally changed human exploration.

    ---

    As I mentioned in another thread, Donaldson will be releasing a new book in the Thomas Covenant chronicles this year as well.

    George R.R. Martin should hopefully get out the next book of his fantasy series too.
     
  3. Danny R

    Danny R Goblin the Pug DBSTalk Gold Club

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    As I mentioned in another thread, Donaldson will be releasing a new book in the Thomas Covenant chronicles this year as well.

    The Runes of Earth is a good continuation of the Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. This new trilogy features Linden Avery, the doctor caught up with Covenant in the second trilogy, again travelling to the Land. As before, an age has passed in the Land while only a few years pass in the "real" world, and the changes we discover caused by previous actions are both unexpected and a logical continuation. Covenant himself is mostly absent.

    Generally I like this trilogy better than the second so far, but not as much as the first. The ending of this first book brings an interesting twist which hopefully will make the next set of the trilogy all the more interesting.

    Another recommendation: Banewrecker by Jacqueline Carey. This is a high fantasy novel which has an interesting twist in that its a tragedy told from the point of view from the losing, usually considered "evil" side. 1st part is available now. Conclusion will be out this summer. This is one of those books I picked up, and found myself staying awake all night so I could finish it. While at first glance its predictable (it intentionally follows a typical high fantasy theme of war between the Gods), the depths of the characters are what drive this. I'd love to hear what others who read this have to say about it.

    Actually I highly recommend all of Carey's fantasy books. Her earlier work is the Kushiel trilogy (Kushiel's Dart, Kushiel's Chosen, Kushiel's Avatar). Her writing is extremely detailed and descriptive. Unlike her newest book, this isn't a "high fantasy" setting, but is much more of a alternative medieval history of Europe. Be warned however that this trilogy has very adult themes dealing with sadomasochism/prostitution/etc that would likely offend the most conservative readers. Despite the very non-traditional environment, the book is definately worth one's time.

    George R.R. Martin should hopefully get out the next book of his fantasy series too.
    Unfortunately not yet...
     
  4. HappyGoLucky

    HappyGoLucky Banned User

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    I've finally gotten around to reading some more. Currently working on the last two books of Stephen King's "The Dark Tower" series. I read Dan Brown's "The DaVinci Code" and enjoyed it a lot, so I have a couple of his other books to peruse later: "Angels & Demons", "Deception Point", and "Digital Fortress".

    I've managed to get a nice little collection of ebooks. Though I still enjoy old-fashioned hardcovers, when money is tight, these ebooks are a way to still enjoy the prose without breaking the budget. And with the ability to increase the size of the font, I can make them easy to read, as well.
     
  5. n8dagr8

    n8dagr8 Resident Rounder DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Small Stakes Hold'em by Miller, Sklansky, and Malmuth
     
  6. jonstad

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    I can higly recommend Richard Dawkin's "The Ancestor's Tale". 600+pages and not a light read in any sense, it is still a well written and interesting chronicle of the history of evolution as we currently understand it. A "must-read" for anyone who still clings to the belief there is no evidence for evolution or it is "just a theory".
     
  7. deraz

    deraz Daydreamer DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I am reading (for probably the fifth time) A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole.

    I consider it the best book ever written.
     
  8. Halfsek

    Halfsek Hall Of Fame

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    Great book! I can't wait for the next one to come out.
    As for Jordan, I just stopped readin his series until he finally finishes. He introduces so many character, then waits 3 years between books and I'm suppoed to remember everything? I think not.

    Try Alastair Reynolds 'Revelation Space'. Very good book. And the followups were great as well.
     
  9. Danny R

    Danny R Goblin the Pug DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Try Alastair Reynolds 'Revelation Space'. Very good book. And the followups were great as well.

    Thanks for the recomendation. My library system doesn't have anything by him, so I put it on order for them to purchase or get via interlibrary loan. I'll thumb through it at the bookstore this weekend as well. Based on the reviews I looked up, it seems to be just up my alley.

    Speaking of new books, I also put in an order for The Wildling by C.S. Friedman. I'm a big fan of everything Friedman has done before (especially the Coldfire trilogy).
     
  10. Halfsek

    Halfsek Hall Of Fame

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    Oh yeah. Loved the Cold Fire Trilogy. I think I read one of the 'space Opera' books he (she?) wrote.

    Since you seem to like fantasy, I really enjoyed David Farland's series. I think 'Lair of Bones' was the first. One of the more original fantasy books that I've read recently.
     
  11. Danny R

    Danny R Goblin the Pug DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I've seen Farland's books, but haven't had the chance to read him yet either. Runelords is the series name. The Bones book is the 4th of the series, with a 5th one coming this year I believe.

    The Sum of All Men I believe was the first (retitled to Runelords: The Sum of All Men). They are apparently making a movie out of this book for release in 2006.

    I like both scifi and fantasy, as long as they are of good quality. Unfortunately there is a long list of authors that started strong but grew weaker as they progressed. Eddings, McCaffrey, Weiss/Hickman to name a few...
     
  12. Halfsek

    Halfsek Hall Of Fame

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    Yeah... Runelords. After reading the Eddings, Jordans and others, I really liked how Farland did the whole magic thing.

    I started reading the Wayferer series when I was on vacation. The first book was called 'Battleaxe'. It was pretty good. I slowly got into it and eagerly bough the 2nd and 3rd book. The author is female, so there is a definitely different style to the writing. A softer edge. But she did a good job. She's apparently the most successful Australian author.
    Anyway, nothing groundbreaking the series, but it's sort of fun.
     
  13. olgeezer

    olgeezer Guest

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    Recently finished "A Suitable Boy" by Seth. Finished "One Hundred Years Of Solitude" by Gabriel Garcia Marques, yesterday. Am starting on a book that i've put off for years, even though i've wanted to experience it; "Lyndon LaRouche And The New American Fascism"
     
  14. deraz

    deraz Daydreamer DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I just read Grisham's "The Broker" in one night. Not one of his best but then again not one of his worst.
     
  15. sikma

    sikma Godfather

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    Any book by JOHN SANFORD. Especially the 'Prey' series!
     
  16. Danny R

    Danny R Goblin the Pug DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Yeah... Runelords. After reading the Eddings, Jordans and others, I really liked how Farland did the whole magic thing.

    Many thanks for this recommendation. I just finished reading the four books of this series and enjoyed them thoroughly. You are right, the way Farland did his magic is rather unique.
     
  17. Halfsek

    Halfsek Hall Of Fame

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    Great. I'm glad you liked them. I'm still working on the Wayferer series. It's worth reading, but not on the level of the Runelords series.
     
  18. DonLandis

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    The Collections of all Human Knowledge
    by Google

    I read it every day but I doub't I'll ever finish this book.
     
  19. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    Not a "book", per se, but wikipedia can be a fascinating read. As some of you might suspect, I enjoy reading reference material and non-fiction, as well as fiction.

    One of the most interesting non-fiction books to me is Terrence Deacon's "The Symbolic Species- The co-evolution of language and the brain". It is a fascinating study on how symbolic thinking triggered co-evolutionary development between language and the brain over two million years of hominid evolution, and ultimately provided the means by which early man began to communicate thoughts and express ideas.

    For years I've been interested in how and why we humans attach labels to everything in order to share, inform, discuss, analyze and refer. Symbolism, it seems, is at the foundation of human communication.
     
  20. Capmeister

    Capmeister Large Hairless ApeCutting Edge: ECHELON '08

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    I'm reading "At Random" right now, which is the biography of Bennett Cerf.
     
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